(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual reports"

to* 



343rd ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 
TOWN OFFfCERS , 






n r 







.-• 




n 



1'1993 



pl&» 



/ 



H 



The cover photo is taken from the watercolor "Rocky 
Narrows" by Conrad M. Franke, graduate of Medfield High 
School, Class of 1974. 

Rocky Narrows Reservation is along the Charles River, 
separating Medfield and Sherborn below Route 27 Bridge. 
Location is behind the State Hospital property. 



343rd Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 



of the 



TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1993 




The 1993 Annual Report is dedicated to 

VINCENT M. CELLUCCI 

Civil Defense Director 
Deputy Chief, Civil Defense Auxiliary Police 

Vinnie has graciously volunteered his services since 1966 to 
Civil Defense and various associated committees including the 
Emergency Planning Commission and Hazmat Committee. On behalf 
of the Town of Medfield, we thank him and the members of the 
Civil Defense team for their dedication to this very 
important volunteer department. 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr., Chairman 
Ann B. Thompson, Clerk 
Tidal B. Henry 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1993medf 



In Memoriam 



BENJAMIN M. 6REELY 

Building Code Committee 1967-1969 



GEORGE HINKLEY, JR. 

Board of Health 1935-1945 



JAMES T. MOYNIHAN 

Friends of Seniors 1979-1993 



JAMES F. TUBRIDY 

Firefighter 1965-1992 
Memorial Day Committee 1974-1993 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1993 
Assessed Valuation 1993 
Tax Rate 



7/1/92 - 6/30/93 
7/1/93 - 6/30/94 



10,864 

$779,209,227.00 

$ 14.59 
$ 15.40 



Area 14.43 Square Miles 

Miles of highway 70.84 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above sea level 
Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 



9th District 

Representative to Congress 



2nd District 

Governor's Councillor 



1st Suffolk and Norfolk District 
Senator in General Court 



13th Norfolk District 

Representative in General Court 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
United State Senators 



John J. Moakley 

World Trade Center, Suite 220 

Boston, MA 02110 

Michael M. Murphy 
8 Flintlocke Lane 
Canton, MA 02021 

Marian Walsh 

Massachusetts Senate 

State House - Room 219 

Boston, MA 02133 

Lida Harkins 

House of Representatives 

State House - Room 257 

Boston, MA 02133 

Edward M. Kennedy 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 

Room 409 

Boston, MA 02203 

John Kerry 

Transportation Building 

10 Park Plaza - Suite 3220 

Boston, MA 02116 



Number of Registered Voters as of December 31, 1993: 

Democrats 1153 

Republicans 1195 

No Party or Designation 4314 

Others 6 



TOTAL 



6668 



1993 ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



MODERATOR 

Term Expires 

Ralph C. Copeland 1994 

TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Preston 1994 

SELECTMEN 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 1994 

Ann B. Thompson 1995 

Tidal B. Henry 1996 

ASSESSORS 

William D. Walsh 1994 

Clara E. Doub 1995 

Carole A. Rossi 1996 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



William F. Tosches 1994 

Richard M. Fitzpatrick, resigned 1995 

Mark F. Wilson 1995 

Clarence A. Purvis 1996 

Sharon K. Semeraro 1996 

F. Paul Quatromoni, appt. to fill resignation 1994 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Elizabeth J. Kozel 1994 

David B. Allan 1994 

James C. Baughman 1995 

Richard M. Fitzpatrick 1995 

Willis H. Pelligian 1996 

Maura Y. McNicholas 1996 

PLANNING BOARD 

Nargaret E. Bancroft 1994 

John K. Gagliani 1995 

Mark G. Cerel 1996 

Paul B. Rhuda 1997 

David B. Sharff 1998 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 

Geralyn N. Warren 1995 

David A. Armstrong 1995 

Nina French 1996 

William J. Heller, Resigned 1996 

Robert Miller 1996 

Eric O'Brien, Appointed to fill resignation 1994 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Valerie A. Mariani, State Appointed September 10, 1996 

Richard D. Jordan 1994 

L. Paul Galante, Jr., resigned 1995 

Diane E. Nightingale, resigned 1996 

James T. Regan 1997 

Janelle Schveighoffer, Appt. to fill resignation 1994 

Mary E. Rogers, Appt. to fill resignation 1994 

TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

Lisa Wood 1994 

Michael J. Sullivan 1995 

Georgia Colivas 1996 



APPOINTMENTS 

FIRE CHIEF 

William A. Kingsbury 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Richard D. Hurley 

SERGEANTS 

Ronald E. Kerr John L. Mayer 

Raymond T. Wheeler John W. Wilhelmi 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Richard D. Bishop Shawn P. Garvey 

Robert W. Brady Stephen H. Grover 

Raymond M. Burton Robert G. Hudson 

Patrick J. Caulfield Thomas P. McNiff 

John F. Carmichael Robert E. Naught on 

Dana P. Friend Kevin W. Robinson 

PERMANENT INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 

Lorna C. Fabbo Ruth E. Gaffey 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. Daniel J. Sicard 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 



(All appointments expire April 1994 unless otherwise stated.) 



TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

Michael J. Sullivan 

TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 

Robert 6. Stokes 
October 1, 1993 - September 30, 1996 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Georgia K. Colivas 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Peter M. Michelson 

BOARD OF HEALTH 



Neil D. MacKenzie 
Heidi F. Groff 
Joan A. Willgohs 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 
David F. McCue 
Eric W. O'Brien 

WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

Lei and D. Beverage 

John J. McKeever 

Peyton C. March 

Neil D. MacKenzie, Associate Member 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Edward M. Hinkley 

TREE WARDEN 
Edward M. Hinkley 

FIELD DRIVER AND FENCE VIEWER 

John P. O' Toole 



1994 
1995 
1996 



1994 
1995 
1996 



1994 
1995 
1996 
1994 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Jennifer A. Shaw 
Matthew Shaw, Assistant 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Jennifer A. Shaw 

POUND KEEPER 
Roy Owen 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

John P. O' Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Assistant Inspector of Buildings 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 
John A. Rose, Jr., Assistant Gas Inspector 

John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 
Tauno 0. Aalto, Assistant Wiring Inspector 
James J. Leonard, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
Joseph E. Ryan 

OFFICIAL HISTORIAN OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
Richard P.DeSorgher 

OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 

Austin C. Buchanan Edward M. Hinkley, Assistant 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Roberta A. Kolsti 1994 

William H. Dunlea, Jr. 1995 

Mary I. MairEtienne 1996 

VETERANS' DEPARTMENT 

Paul F. Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent 
G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 

COLLECTOR OF WATER AND SEWER USE CHARGES 

Robert G. Stokes September 30, 1996 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Patricia A. Rioux 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 
Patricia A. Rioux 

PUBLIC WEIGHER 
Patricia A. Rioux 



10 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP 



Richard D. Bishop 
Raymond M. Burton, Jr 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
John F. Carmichael 
Joseph G. Cavanaugh 
Lorna C. Fabbo 
Dana P. Friend 
Ruth A. Gaffey 
John T. Garvey 
Shawn P. Garvey 
John F. Gerlach 
Stephen H. Grover 
Robert G. Hudson 
Richard D. Hurley 



Ronald E. Kerr 

George W. Kingsbury 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 

William H. Mann 

John L. Mayer 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Robert E. Naughton 

Louise Papadoyiannis 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Kevin W. Robinson 

Daniel J. Sicard 

Thomas Tabarani 

Raymond J. Wheeler 

John W. Wilhelmi 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Lorna G. Fabbo 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Mary I. MairEtienne 
Elisabeth T. Mann 



Louise Papadoyiannis 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Jennifer A. Shaw 

Mary L. Solar i 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Maj. A. F. Abdallah 
Leo Acera 
Jerry W. Adams 
Albert Baima 
Edwin Bettencourt 
Herbert Burr 
Steven Burke 
William A. Carlson 
Jonathan M. Carroll 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Joseph Concannon 
Berton Cummings 
Robert E. Currie 
William J. Davis 
Thomas G. Degnim 
Joseph T. Destito 
Robert A. Dixon 
Michael J. Doran 
Kenneth Dunbar 
William J. Dwyer 
David Eberle 
David C. Egy 
Rob. V. Eklund, Jr. 
Leo R. Ethier, Jr. 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Susan A. Fornaciari 
Kevin Fortier 
John Gerlach 
Barry Glassman 
John J. Havkett, Jr, 



Glen R. Eykel 

Pamela B. Holmes 

David J. Holt 

William D. Jones 

Winslow Karlson III 

Joseph Lapre 

Thomas Leen, Jr. 

Joy Leonard 

Roderick A. MacLeod 

David R. McConnell 

Edward J. Meau 

Aaron J. Mick 

Paul J. Murphy 

Frank S. Newell 

Peter Opansetts 

Louise Papadoyiannis 

Jeffrey Peavey 

James P. Pignone 

Stephen K. Plympton 

Janet M. Poirier 

Thomas Quinn 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Gary C. Rowley 

Robert J. Shannon 

Carl Sheridan 

Paul Sicard 

Charles H. Stone, Jr. 

John F. Sullivan 

Thomas A. Tabarani 

J. Robert Tosi 



11 



Steven F. Hagan 
Thomas Hamano 
Patrick Harris 
Timothy P. Heinz 
John Holmes 



Thomas Walsh 

Alan F. Washkewits 

Colin T. Wise 

Donna M. Wo If rum 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Robert W. Brady 
Joseph Carvalho 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
George Kingsbury 
Elisabeth T. Mann 



William H. Mann 

Armando B. Palmieri 

Mary L. Solar i 

Jennifer A. Shaw 

Armando Viera, Jr. 



AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICER 
Irene L. 0' Toole 

AFFORDABLE HOUSING COMMITTEE 



Bonnie Wren-Burgess 
Sharon Loventhal 
Stephen M. Nolan 
Peter M. Michelson 
Diane Maxson 



Charles H. Peck 
Michael J. Sullivan 

Ann B. Thompson 
Mary Ellen Thompson 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Jean C. Brown 

Robert K. Williams 

John J. Lynch 

Carl J. Brewer 

Ben B. Korbly 

Madeleine I. Harding, Associate Member 

Annie M. Rogers, Associate Member 



April 1994 
April 1994 
April 1995 
April 1995 
April 1996 
April 1994 
April 1994 



AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT COMPLIANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE 



Jane Archer 
Kenneth Feeney 
Fred Rogers 



Austin Buchanan 

Chief Richard Hurley 

Michael J. Sullivan 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING - SUBDIVISION CONTROL 



Ralph C. Good, Jr., resigned 

Stephen M. Nolan, appt. to fill resignation 

Robert F. Sylvia 

Burgess P. Standley 

Sandra G. Munsey, Associate Member, resigned 

Osier M. Peterson, Assoc. Member, appt. to fill 

Charles H. Peck, Associate Member 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. , Associate Member 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1994 
1994 
1995 
1996 
1994 
1994 
1994 
1994 



12 



ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS COMMITTEE 

Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. Beverly Hallovell 

Bruno J. Palumbo Christie A. Shoop 
Michael J. Sullivan 

COUNCIL ON ARTS 

Wendy Clarridge Corkum April 1994 

Steven Guy April 1995 

Philip B. Barnard April 1995 

Steven H. Cook April 1996 

Lucinda Davis April 1996 

Connie Jones April 1996 

John Horgan April 1996 

Francis A. Iafolla April 1997 

William F. Pope April 1997 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 

Clara B. Doub Robert H. Gibbs 

CABLE FRANCHISE NEGOTIATING COMMITTEE 

Thomas Sweeney Clara B. Doub 

Robert Gibbs Robert Sawyer 

William Kean Dr. Marion Cat 1 in 

CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Margaret E. Bancroft Michael J. Sullivan 

Tidal B. Henry Patricia Whitney 

Nancy Temple Horan 

CEMETERY AGENT 
Lawrence G. Whitestone 

CHARLES RIVER NATURAL STORAGE AREA DESIGNEES 

Michael J. Sullivan Kenneth P. Feeney 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Director 

Thomas Hamano, Underwater Rescue and Recovery 

Patrick S. Harris, Chief Radio Operator 

Judith c. Harris, Radio Operator 

Harold Economos, Radio Operator 

Barry M. Glassman, Radio Operator 

William Johnson, Radio Operator 

Vernon Valero, Radio Operator 

Patricia A. Rioux, Shelter Manager 

CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Deputy Chief 

Bruce Berry, Sergeant 



13 



Paul B. Alberta 
Raymond M. Burton, Jr 
Harold Economos 
Robert S. Gallagher 
Barry M. Glassman 
Thomas Hamano 
Judith C. Harris 
Patrick S. Harris 
William Johnson 
Craig Jones 
Eric Jones 
Nicholas R. Matczak 



John L. Mayer 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Lorieanne D. Niles 

Thomas Ralph 

Tobey J. E. Reed 

Patricia A. Rioux 

James S. Ryan, Jr. 

Gordon Spencer 

Vernon Valero 

Jennifer Shaw 

Armando R. Viera, Jr. 

Wayne Sallale 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Richard D. Hurley 
Tidal B. Henry 



Peter M. Michelson 
Michael J. Sullivan 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



Aldo L. D'Angelo 
Leonard C. Haigh 
Edward Touhey 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Douglas S. Sparrow 

Caroline D. Standley 

Craig S. Harwood 

John Thompson 

Ralph Parmigiane 

Ann Lee Howell 

Robert J. Ingram 

Theresa A. Cos, Associate Member 

James G. White, Associate Member 

Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate Member 

Scott D. Pitz, Associate Member 



David Noonan 


Harvey D. Hoover j 


Edwin J. Kinter 


April 


1994 


April 


1994 


April 


1994' 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1996 


April 


1994 


April 


1994 


April 


1994 


April 


1994 



CONSTABLE FOR ELECTIONS 
Nancy J. Preston 

CONTRACT COMPLIANCE OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 
Paul E. H ink ley 
Ann B. Thompson 



April 1994 
April 1995 
April 1995 



NATIONAL ORGANIZATION ON DISABILITY 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 



14 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMITTEE 



Raymond M. Burton 
Robert E. Currie 
Richard D. Hurley 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr 



Joan M. Kiessling 

James D. Sullivan, M.D. 

Michael J. Sullivan 



EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Vincent M. Cellucci 
Kenneth F. Feeney 
Richard D. Hurley 



Robert A. Kinsman 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Ann B. Thompson 



EMPLOYEE INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



George J. Callahan 
Pauline Cooley 
Robert H. White 



Malcolm J.Gibson 

Virginia A. Murley 

Robert J. Santoro 



Georganne Iverson-Kelley 
ENFORCING OFFICER FOR ZONING 



John P. O' Toole 



Anthony Calo, Assistant 



ENTERPRISE FUND COMMITTEE 



Leland D. Beverage 
Tidal B. Henry 
John J. McKeever 
Georgia Colivas 



John F. Kendrick 
Diane Nightingale 
Ann Marie Murphy 



ETHICS COMMITTEE 



Kenneth P. Feeney 

Peyton C. March 

Neal R. Olsen 

Michael J. Sullivan 



Margaret Maider 
Nancy J. Preston 



FAIR HOUSING OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 

FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 
Robert G. Stokes Reverend Robert L. Wood 

STUDY COMMITTEE TO DEVELOP 458 MAIN STREET 



Jane B. Archer 
Francis A. Iafolla 



Margaret Bancroft 
Elizabeth Moore 



MEDFIELD REPRESENTATIVE TO REGIONAL HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 

Francis H. Tosches 



HAZMAT COMMITTEE 



Vincent M. Cellucci 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

Richard D. Hurley 

William A. Kingsbury 



Robert A. Kinsman 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Ann B. Thompson 

Joan A. Willgohs 



15 



OFFICIAL TOWN HISTORIAN 
Richard P. DeSorgher 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Paul E. Nyren, Jr 

Donald J. MacDonald 

Priscllla Batting 

Deborah Kelsey 

Richard L. Reinemann 

David F. Temple 

Burgess P. Standley 

Eleanor Anes, Associate Member 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 

David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSI 



Richard DeSorgher 
Donald J. MacDonald 



April 


1994 


April 


1994 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1996 


April 


1996 


April 


1994 


April 


1994 


April 


1994 


Stephen M. Nolan 


ul E. Nyren! 


Jr. 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



W. Grant Chambers 



Joseph B. McWilliams 



KINGSBURY POND COMMITTEE 



Joseph Comeau 

Michael Cronin 

Barbara Leighton 

Donald J. MacDonald 

Thomas S. Lingel, Associate Member 



Paul E. Nyren, Jr. 

Richard Ostrander 

Paul Simpson 

Michael J. Sullivan 



LOCAL AUCTION PERMIT AGENT 
Irene L. 0' Toole 

LOCAL WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OFFICIAL 
Kenneth P. Feeney 

LOCAL ELECTION DISTRICT REVIEW COMMITTEE 

Nancy J. Preston Robert G. Stokes 

MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 
Michael J. Sullivan 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD 



Harold F. Pritoni, Jr 
Tidal B. Henry 
Barbara Cincotta 
Paul Bardelli 
Joan Kiessling 



Ann B. 
Robert 
Leo J, 
Darrah 



Thompson 

T. Mintz 

Surette 

O'Connor 



John Sullivan 



16 



MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL REUSE COMMITTEE 

Paul Rhuda Paul Bardelli 

Marion Caitlin Richard Guilmette 

Timothy Hall Laura Cat 1 in 

Mark Cerel Ann B. Thompson 

Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 

METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

Martha L. Smick August 1994 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Paul F. Curran Albert J. Manganello, Jr. 

Clifford G. Doucette June Doucette 

Tidal B. Henry Frank C. Mayer 

Richard D. Hurley Irene L. 0' Toole 

William A. Kingsbury Dorcas B. Owen 

Gerald P. Kazan jian Ernest C. Roy 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 

Paul F. Curran Richard F. DeSorgher 

Robert A. Kinsman David F. Temple 

Patricia A. Walsh 

MILLIS CONSORTIUM FOR RECYCLING 
Kenneth P. Feeney 

MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISE OFFICER 
Irene L. O' Toole 

MUNICIPAL CENSUS SUPERVISOR 
Nancy J. Preston 

NEPONSET WATER SUPPLY PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 
Leland D. Beverage 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 
Tidal B. Henry 

OPEN SPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Jonathan Bennett Martha L. Smick 

Christine M. Ha j jar Caroline D. Standley 
Jane Ann Hayes James W. Sullivan 

Eric W. O'Brien 

PARKING CLERK AND HEARING OFFICER 

Nancy J. Preston Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Asst. 



PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS COMMITTEE 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. Michael J. Sullivan 

Kenneth P. Feeney 



17 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



Andrew Costello 
Cheryl Dunlea 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Sandra Frigon 
Cynthia Greene 



David Stephenson 

James O'Shaunessey 

Daniel O'Toole 

Erin Pastuszenski 

Annette Wells 



JOINT REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 

RIGHT-TO-KNOW COORDINATOR 
William A. Kingsbury 

SAFETY COMMITTEE 



Jane B. Archer 
Kenneth P. Feeney 



Marguerite M. Eppich 
Irene L. O'Toole 



STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE 



R. Edward Beard 
Robert Sawyer 
Donald Harding 



Lida Harkins 

Randie Martin 

Richard DeSorgher 



THREE RIVERS INTERLOCAL COUNCIL (MAPC) 



Martha Smick 



Michael J. Sullivan 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEDFIELD CENTER TRAFFIC 



Richard D. Hurley, Chief 
Kenneth M. Chi Ids, Jr. 
Richard Hangen 



Mark G. Cerel 
David Temple 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Marc R. Mercandante 
Eric B. Palson 
Mark W. Carrigan 
Peter C. Dunn 
Andrew M. Kepple 
Jill A. Steinkeler 
Noah W. Weinstein 
Thomas R. Guilmette 
Sheila M. McCabe 
Lauren M. Young 
Katherine L. Kearney 
Tracie L. Slack 
L. Paul Galante III 
Jennifer A. Karnakis 
Brendan D. McNulty 
Elizabeth Newton 
Regina O'Connor 
Kimberly A.E. O'Connor 



Sara E. Mastronardi 

Nicholas J. Scobbo III 

Matthew P. DeSorgher 

Jacquelyn M. Frazier 

Drew C. Marticke 

Kelly E. Thomson 

Daniel V. Arnold 

Jillian D. Mariani 

Elizabeth L. McKeever 

Allison M. Foley 

Jennifer L. LaFrance 

Anna-Mari Spognardi 

Ellen L. Gray 

Melissa P. Kelcourse 

Ray M. Burton, Jr. 

Mary V. Gillis 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 



18 



APPOINTED BY ASSESSORS 

Stanley E. Bergeron, Assistant Assessor 
Irene M. Hartling, Assistant Assessor 
Marjorie M. Temple, Assistant Assessor 

APPOINTED BY TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
June Doucette, Assistant 

APPOINTED BY TOWN CLERK 

Dorcas B. Oven, Assistant 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Assistant Hearing Officer 

APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF THE SELECTMEN 
CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
AND THE MODERATOR 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVE 

Karl D. Lord June 30, 1995 



APPOINTED BY FIRE CHIEF 

Charles G. Seavey, Deputy Fire Chief 
Thomas Seeley, Captain 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lieutenant 
Richard M. Rogers, Lieutenant 
David C. O' Toole, Lieutenant 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



William R. Domey, P.E., Engineer/Agent 
John J. Keefe, R.S., Milk Inspector/Agent 
Mae L. Otting, Administrative Assistant 



April 1994 
April 1994 
April 1994 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

DEPUTY MODERATOR 
Andrew F. Thompson, Jr. 

WARRANT COMMITTEE 



Thompson S. Lingel 
Neal R. Olsen 
Martin Rosen 
John F. Kendrick 
Stephen Buckley, 
James F. O'Neil, 
Pat Whitney 
Mary W. Harney 
John F. Kendrick 
George P. Niles, 



a 


April 1994 




April 1994 




April 1994 




April 1995 


Jr. resigned 


April 1995 


Appt. to fill resignation 


April 1995 




April 1995 




April 1996 




April 1996 


Jr. 


April 1996 



19 



PERMANENT SCHOOL BUILDING AND PLANNING COMMITTEE 



Mark H. Kaizerman 

F. Paul Quatromoni 

David R. Iverson 

Harry C. Merrow 

Elmer O. Portmann 

Thomas M. Reis, Ex Officio 



April 1994 
April 1995 
April 1995 
April 1996 
April 1996 



APPOINTED BY THE COMMITTEE CONSISTING OF TH E MODERATOR. 
THE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN AND CHAIRMAN 
OF THE WARRANT CQUMITTffE 

PERSONNEL BOARD 



James F. Lynn 
Marcel Joseph, resigned 
Kathleen M. Curran, appt 
Jane T. Coury 



to fill resig 



November 30, 1995 

November 30, 1994 

November 30, 1994 

November 30, 1996 



APPOINTED 3Y THE PWWINQ BQAyp 



ASSOCIATE PLANNING BOARD MEMBER FOR SITE PLAN REVIEWS 



Joseph R. Parker, Jr 



April 1994 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 
formerly, THE MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



Gregory A. Beedy 
Margaret H. Gryska 
Timothy P. Sullivan 
Andrea C. Costello 
Burgess P. Standley 
David G. Strimaitis 
Geralyn M. Warren 
Denise Yurkof sky 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



Philip P. Bonanno 
Paul J. Alfano 
Ann J. Grady 
Jane Kimball 



June 28, 
June 28, 
June 28, 
June 28, 
June 28, 
June 28, 
June 28, 
June 28, 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER /COLLECTOR 



1994 
1994 
1994 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 



April 1994 
April 1995 
April 1996 
April 1996 



Marguerite M. Eppich, Assistant Treasurer September 30, 1994 
Nancy Griffin, Assistant Collector September 30, 1994 



20 



BOARD, COMMITTEE AND COMMISSION MEETINGS 



NAME 

Annual 

Town Election 

Annual 

Town Meeting 

Appeals Board 



Arts Council 
Assessors 
Civil Defense 

Conservation 

Health 

Historical Comm, 

Housing 
Authority 



DAY 

Last Monday 
in March 

Last Monday 
in April 

Wednesdays 
as needed 

Biannually 

1st Thursday/Mo. 

1st Tuesday /Mo. 

1st & 3rd 
Thursday/Month 

1st and 3rd 
Wednesday/Month 

3rd Wednesday /Mo 

3rd Monday /Month 



Library Trustees 2nd Tuesday/Month 



Park and 
Recreation 

Planning 

Recycling 

School Comm. 

Selectmen 
Warrant Comm. 
Water & Sewer 



2nd & 4th 
Tuesday/Month 

Monday every Week 

1st & 3rd 
Tuesday/Month 



TIME 

6 A.M. to 
8 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 
7:00 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 

6:30 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 



1st & 3rd 7:30 P.M. 

Monday/ Sept . -June 

(once a mo. July-August) 

Tuesday (every other 7:00 P.M. 
Tuesday & as needed) 



Tuesday-Fall to 
Town Meeting 



8:30 P.M 



1st & 3rd Tuesday 7:30 P.M. 



PLACE 

Memorial 
School 

High School 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Police 
Station 

Town Hall 
Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Tilden 
Village 

Library 

Pfaff Ctre 

Town Hall 
Town Hall 

Dale St. 

Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 



21 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1993 



23 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the residents of Medfield: 

The Board reorganized for the ensuing year in March. Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. was elected 
Chairman, Ann B. Thompson was elected Clerk and newly elected third member Tidal B. 
Henry was welcomed. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES: 

The Strategic Planning Committee, under the direction of Chairman R. Edward 
Beard, presented a comprehensive report based upon its meetings with Town boards, 
committees and departments. The recommendations suggested ways in which the town 
could improve its operations through consolidation of functions such as buildings and 
grounds maintenance and library services, through regionalization of municipal services, 
through increasing revenue sources to pay for Town services and through containing or 
avoiding major cost increases such as a full-time fire department. The Committee 
recommended that all long term planning efforts be coordinated by a single committee 
made up of the chairmen of the Board of Selectmen, the Warrant Committee and the 
Planning Board; the Superintendent of Schools and the Town Administrator. 

In response to these recommendations the Selectmen joined the Selectmen of the 
Towns of Millis and Norfolk in a study, funded by the Massachusetts Executive Office of 
Community Development, to explore the feasibility of consolidating the police 
departments of the three towns. The study concluded that a complete consolidation of 
police departments was not advisable but the Towns agreed to continue to work together 
to see if it would be possible to consolidate, contract for or jointly undertake limited 
police department functions, such as traffic enforcement, ambulance service or purchasing. 

Medfield took part in another regional effort to consolidate services as a 
participant in the bidding process for a regional recycling facility put together by the Millis 
consortium. At the end of the year town officials were reviewing information on the 
selected bidder to decide if it would make sense for Medfield to sign up as a member of 
the consortium or to continue with recycling from the present transfer station off Route 
27. 

In July the Selectmen appointed an Ethics Committee and charged them with 
reviewing the various state laws, the Town charter and Town bylaws to make a 
determination as to whether sufficient controls were in place to guide the conduct of 
public officials in the carrying out of their duties. The committee reported back to the 
Selectmen in November with a recommendation to establish a new by-law governing the 
appointment of Town officials and their relatives to Town positions. An article will be 
placed on the 1994 Annual Town Meeting warrant proposing the adoption of such a 
bylaw. 

In June, ten residents were appointed to the Medfield State Hospital Community 
Advisory Board. This Board established by the State Hospital administration was set up to 
keep Medfield and neighboring communities informed about developments at the hospital. 



24 



ELECTIONS TO FILL VACANCIES 

During the course of the year the following individuals were elected to fill 
vacancies on Town elected boards at special elections held jointly by the Board of 
Selectmen and the Board with the vacancy: 

BOARD OFFICER RESIGNING ELECTED REPLACEMENT 

Housing Authority Diane E. Nightingale Janelle R. Schveighoffer 

Housing Authority L. Paul Galante, Jr. Mary E. Rogers 

School Committee Richard M. Fitzpatrick F. Paul Quatromoni 

Park & Recreation William J. Heller Eric W. O'Brien 

In August John F. Carmichael was appointed a permanent full-time police officer. 
In September Robert G. Stokes was reappointed Treasurer Collector for a three 
year term ending September 30, 1996. 

Recognitions: 

Sandra G. Munsey was presented with a certificate of appreciation for her many 
years of service to the Town. From 1969 until 1993, Ms. Munsey served as a member of 
numerous Town boards and commissions including the Charter Commission, the Planning 
Board, the Town Government Study Committee, the Board of Selectmen, the Financial 
Management Study Committee and the Zoning Board of Appeals. She was the First 
woman elected to the Board of Selectmen and the first female Chairman. 

Senior Police Dispatcher Patrica Rioux was honored for developing a planning 
guide for the E911 emergency police dispatch system, which was scheduled to go on line 
in the early part of 1994. Thanks to her efforts Medfield will be one of the first 
communities in the Commonwealth to activate the new E91 1 system. 

Jonathan Mahon, a third grade student, who was also honored by the Governor; 
Police Officer Ray M. Burton, Jr. and Emergency Medical Technician Sally C. Wood were 
commended for their efforts to inform the public of the importance of and need to wear 
seat belts whenever riding in a motor vehicle. 

Civil Defense Auxiliary Police Officers Judith C. and Patrick S. Harris were cited 
for their work above and beyond the call of duty; manning the Civil Defense Emergency 
Center during the December 1993 snowstorm at a great personal cost to themselves and 
without regard to their own safety. 

Peter and Jennifer Kennedy were recognized for their efforts to preserve and 
restore their home at 42 Green St., which had once served as St. Edward's parish rectory, 
as a tailor shop and as a shoe shop prior to being moved from its Main St. location. 

TRAFFIC AND SAFETY ISSUES: 

After being closed for several years the Curve St. bridge was finally being rebuilt 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Removal of the old structure began in 
December. A new pre-engineered bridge with a sidewalk on the Northerly side was 
scheduled to be in operation by the spring of 1994. Residents of Curve St. were 
particularly concerned with pedestrian safety and increased traffic as a result of the 



25 



reopening of the bridge. The Board agreed to conduct a traffic study of the area when the 
bridge is completed. 

The purchase of a large tract of land along the southwesterly side of Causeway St. 
near Orchard St. and it subsequent development as a residential housing development led 
to the installation of water mains and the paving of a considerable portion of the unpaved 
section of Causeway St. Numerous meetings were held with residents of the area to 
address their concerns about traffic safety and the changing character of the area. 

The development of another large parcel of land off South St. extension created 
many problems for residents of the area as installation of utilities disrupted traffic and left 
the road nearly impassable for much of the fall and winter months. In addition, the site 
was denuded, as trees were cut down and topsoil removed in order to conduct massive 
regrading operations at the site. Subsequent heavy rainstorms created washouts and 
flooding conditions on South St. extension on many occasions. 

Similar disruptions were commonplace during the year as developers anxiously 
proceeded with subdivisions off Pine St. , Route 109 and at various locations throughout 
the Town. 

After several traffic accidents at the intersection of Oak and Pleasant Sts. the Chief 
of Police recommended and the Selectmen agreed to install the Town's first set of four 
way stop signs at this location. 

The Town Meeting appropriated funds for a study of the traffic signals along 
Route 109. Upon completion of the study the Town expects to apply for federal funds to 
cover the cost of replacing these traffic signals. Most of Route 109, with the exception of 
the downtown area, was resurfaced during the summer months. 

OPEN SPACE AND PROTECTION OF NATURAL RESOURCES: 

With the rapid acceleration of development activity during the year, as the real 
estate recession subsided, residents became increasingly concerned with the changing 
character of the Town. In the fall a forum was held at the High School to consider the 
effect this development was having on the Town. The Charles River Land Trust , a private 
group attempting to preserve open space along the Charles River Valley, agreed to admit 
Medfield as a member. The Open Space Committee worked with local residents to 
develop a trail, which would link the Stephen Hinkley Swim Pond with Rocky Woods 
Reservation. In December the Ritchie family donated Ritchie Pond and adjacent land 
along route 27 for access to the Town. This very generous gift will assure that future 
generations of Medfield residents will be able to use and enjoy this beautiful natural 
resource. 

The pressure of development created strong tensions in Medfield as residents and 
town officials struggled to develop a consensus on how best to preserve and protect the 
small town charm which had attracted many residents to the Town. Even the water supply 
became an issue, as a water ban caused by a severe drought in the Northeast led the Water 
& Sewerage Board to redouble their efforts to put well #6, along the Charles River near 
the Medfield State Hospital, on line in order to meet the demands of water users. 
Concerns were also raised about the construction of septic systems near Town well fields. 
At the same time the Commonwealth of Massachusetts was proposing stringent new 
regulations, which would have made cesspools illegal and imposed new regulations on the 

26 



I construction and maintenance of septic systems. At year end revised regulations were 
ij being proposed as a result of a statewide concern with the cost of implementing the first 
I set of new regulations. 

The Community Gardens Committee, under the direction of Edwin Kinter, 
i surveyed the Town to find a new site for the community gardens which had previously 
li been located at the site of the Allandale affordable housing development off Dale St. The 
I new garden, which was opened in the spring, was located on North St. on a parcel of land 
i which the School Committee agreed to make available for this use. The Public Works 
Department assisted with grading and the installation of water pipes. 

i TOWN COMMON: 

The gazebo on the Town Common continues to be the focus of activity and an 

■ attractive destination in the center. The first wedding was performed there this year and 

i many brides use this setting for wedding photographs. During the summer the Park and 

i Recreation Commission sponsored several evening concerts on the green. The gazebo and 

j Town Common were formally dedicated in September, as part of the Medfield Day 

ceremonies, with many of the individual and business benefactors who made this project 

| possible in attendance. In December tree lighting and caroling prepared youngsters for a 

special visit from Santa Claus. The Town Common, ten years in the making, has been 

worth the wait. It is a place of quiet relief from the noise and congestion of the downtown 

and a gathering spot for residents of all ages. To all of those who made this a reality, 

thank you. 

CONCLUSION 

After a few years of slow development, 1993 came back with a boom; a building 
boom. Many residents were unhappy with the changes they saw as fields and woods were 
converted to subdivisions and houses sprung up everywhere. The new housing stock 
placed increased demands on Town services, as Town officials struggled to deal with 
water shortages, increased school enrollment and traffic congestion. By year end, 
however, progress had been made on several fronts in developing a response to the 
accelerated growth. As in the past, Medfield reached out to welcome its new residents, 
while at the same time it strove to preserve what brought them here. Hopefully, growth 
and change can coexist with conservation, tradition and a respect for the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold F Pritoni, Jr., Chairman 
Ann B. Thompson, Clerk 
Tidal B. Henry 

Board of Selectmen 



27 




Dedication ceremonies at the Town Common, 



28 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my 12th Annual Report for the Public 
Works Department. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

Resurfacing: The following streets were resurfaced: 

Slurry Seal - Hearthstone Drive, Crest Circle, Ledgetree 
Road, Hillcrest Road, Wildwood Drive, Belknap Road, Rolling 
Lane, Bow Street and Fairview Road. 

Stone Seal - Cross Street, Philip Street, Nebo Street, 
Foundry Street, Adams Street, Dale Street, Bridge Street, 
Grove Street and Peter Kristof Way. 

Causeway Street : This street was surfaced for a distance of 
3207 feet from the flood plan to Noonhill Road. The project 
was funded by the State at a cost of $57,493. 

Main Street: Main Street was resurfaced from the Dover line 
to Brook Street and from the intersection of Route 27 to the 
Millis line. This project was also funded with State Highway 
funds at a cost of $213,072. 

Sidewalks: Main Street sidewalk was repaired and resurfaced 
for a distance of 200 feet. 

Baker 's Pond Cleanup: This project was delayed one year 
by environmental concerns and an additional funding of $5,000 
is necessary to address these concerns. 

Noonhill Road: The State Department of Environmental 
Protection required additional information from the Town 
addressing wetland concerns. This additional information cost 
the Town $6,000 which was appropriated at the Annual Town 
Meeting in April. Hopefully this project will be completed in 
1994. 

Community Gardens: The Medfield Highway Department, working 
with the Garden Committee, built new gardens off North 
Street. The new Community Gardens consist of 33 lots. 

Snow: The total snow fall for 1993 was 81 1/2 inches. The 
normal snow fall for Medfield is approximately 60 inches. 



29 



TRANSFER STATION 
Recycled: Glass 

Cans 

Newsprint 

#2 Plastics 

White Goods Metal 

Grass and Leaves 1500 cubic yards 

Revenue received from Deposit Cans and Bottles $2,564.75 



104.14 


tons 


21.98 


tons 


713.77 


tons 


14.77 


tons 


304 


tons 



The Medfield Highway Department trucked 5527.65 
rubbish to the Millbury incinerator. 



tons of 



WATER 



The Medfield Water Department replaced, 
inspected the following: 



installed or 



New Water Mains 



94 new services 
74 new meters 
37 stopped meters 
10 repairs 



2400' 

2600' 

1400' 

1300' 

800' 

2500' 

600' 

960' 



Causeway Street 
Wampatuck Estates 
Flintlocke Lane Extension 
Kettle Pond Estates 
Haven Road 

South Street Extension 
Grist Mill Road 
Hawthorne Drive 



The total 
gallons. 



amount of water pumped in 1993 was 397,869,000 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 1993 the Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant treated 
339,210,960 gallons of sewage at 95% or more removal of 
impurities with no violations of its discharge permit. We 
also treated 592,550 gallons of septage and trucked 754,000 
gallons of 4% sludge to the Rhode Island incinerator. 

Numerous State and Federal inspections of the Wastewater 
Treatment Plant found everything to be in order. 

In September, Weston and Sampson Engineers completed the 
Infiltration Inflow Study and found the street sewers to be 
in good working order. 



30 



In conclusion, appreciation is expressed to secretaries 
Edith Fernald of the Highway Department and to Evelyn Clarke 
of the Water and Sewer Department, Robert Kennedy, Street 
Department Foreman, Charles Evans, Water and Sewer Foreman 
and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator of the Wastewater Treatment 
Plant, as well as, all the men of the various departments who 
are to be commended for their continuous conscientious public 
service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth P. Feeney, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 




Winter scene on North Street 
(Courtesy of Suburban Press) 



31 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1993. 

This year we had one retirement from the department. In 
March, after 32 years of service, Charles Grover retired. The 
members of the department and myself thank him for his years 
of dedicated service. We also recruited some new members. In 
July, William Callow and Joseph Visser came aboard and in 
October we welcomed Paul Loiacono and Jeffrey Maloney. We are 
looking forward to their contribution to the department. 

The apparatus for the most part is in good condition. We 
have been experiencing more breakdowns with our Ladder Truck. 
This unit, a 1963 Pirsh was purchased used and parts are very 
difficult to obtain as they are no longer being made. It will 
have to be given serious consideration for replacement in the 
near future. Our capital improvements this year included the 
purchasing of 1200' of 4" large diameter supply line with the 
necessary hardware and valves and also a new 4 -wheel drive 
command vehicle. Both of these items will greatly enhance the 
overall operation of the department. 

Training was conducted throughout the year. Medfield was 
the host community for two classes, Fire Arson and Detection 
and Large Diameter Hose, that were conducted by the 
Massachusetts Fire Academy and attended by firefighters from 
area towns. In the fall we were also host to a Mutual Aid 
drill that involved over seventy- five firefighters and fifteen 
pieces of fire apparatus from the towns of Millis, Sherborn, 
Dover and Medfield. It was a tremendous learning experience 
for everyone involved. 

Fire prevention inspections and drills were conducted at 
the schools, hospital buildings, nursing home, and other 
public buildings as well as new home and resale inspections 
throughout the year. 

I wish to thank all the members for their continued 
support and dedication to the department. I would also like to 
thank our volunteer dispatcher Fred Rogers, Town Officials, 
and Town Hall personnel for their help and cooperation 
throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury, Fire Chief 
MEDFIELD FIRE DEPARTMENT 



32 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1993 

ALARMS 

Accidental 70 

Box 162 

False 2 

Still 134 

Home 20 

SERVICES 

Ambulance Assist 1 

Appliances 9 

Bomb Scares 6 

Brush and Grass 37 

Burners oil: 6 

Gas: 1 

Chimneys 1 

Details 7 

Dumpsters 7 

Electrical 9 

Fuel Spills 5 

Investigations 69 

Motor Vehicles 2 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 2 

Mutual Aid - Rendered: 7 

- Received: 3 

Rescues 1 

Reports to Fire Marshal 4 

Responses to Medfield State Hospital 22 

Station Duty 2 

Structures 6 

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE 

Lock Outs 2 

Pumping Cellars 4 

Water Problems 10 

Searches 2 

Other 3 

INSPECTIONS 

Blasting 131 

Fire Prevention 40 

Fuel Storage 17 

New Residential 77 

New Commercial 1 

Smoke Detectors - New 77 

- Resale 199 

Oil Burners 20 

Wood stoves 8 



33 



PERMITS ISSUED 
Blasting 
Bonfire 
Burning 
Fuel Storage 

Fire Alarm Installation/Alt 
Propane Storage 
Powder Storage 

Sprinkler System Installation/Alt 
Understorage Tank Removals 



26 

1 

1260 

17 

1 
10 

3 

8 
14 




Medfield Firefighters marching in Memorial Day Parade 
(Photo courtesy of Medfield Suburban Press.) 



34 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Board 
of Selectmen and residents who have assisted the Department 
throughout the year. The Tri-Town Police Department study 
seems to have come to an end and doesn't appear to be anything 
that will happen in the near future, however, a regionalized 
or privatized ambulance service appears to be a possibility 
and is being actively explored. 

Again this year the department has seen a rise in Family 
Problems with almost a seventy percent increase in calls over 
last year. This still statistically is the most dangerous call 
a police officer can respond to. Larcenies, disturbances and 
motor vehicle accidents all showed a significant increase. 
Violence once again found its way to the borders of Medfield 
with a triple shooting at the Medf ield/Millis Town line which 
left one man dead and two wounded. Through the efforts of 
local and State police the assailant was apprehended and 
awaits trial. 

All Officers have continued training in the areas of 
Domestic Violence, Constitutional Law, Motor Vehicle Law, CPR 
and First Responder. All Officers this year were given 
sensitivity training in the area of sexual harassment. The 
Court System as of January 1, 1994 goes to a one trial system 
to streamline the court system to help ease the backlog, all 
officers attended training on the new court reform. Officer 
Ray Burton completed the DARE officers school and will bring 
his program to the schools in January of 1994. 

Officer John Carmichael joined the full time ranks in 
August and started his academy training in October and should 
be on the beat in early February 1994. Officer Lorna Fabbo 
was hired as a dispatcher in April to replace Officer 
Carmichael who has served well in that position. The 
department was split into two areas, the administrative branch 
headed by Sergeant John Wilhelmi and the patrol branch headed 
by Sergeant Ronald Kerr. This hopefully will give a better 
flow to the chain of command. Jennifer Shaw was hired in July 
to the Animal Control Officer position, a position which had 
been handled part-time by the Safety Officer. The addition of 
Officer Carmichael brings the department staffing level back 
up to where it was five years ago. The need for additional 
officers is very much there with increased crime and 
complexity of new laws. 

From August through November we had the pleasure of 
having an intern from the Netherlands Jolanda Trijselaar 
working with us. Jolanda was working on her Masters and did 
extensive work on the Tri-Town Police study. Much thanks to 
her, we will miss having her working with us. 



35 



The upcoming year, 1994, looks like it will be busy, 
especially for the dispatchers. The new enhanced 911 system is 
here, thanks to Dispatcher Patricia Rioux whose 100% accuracy 
on the database file she compiled gave Medfield the honor of 
being the only municipality in the state with 100% accuracy 
and giving us the edge and honor to be in the first group of 
ten (10) towns to go on line with the enhanced 911. 
Congratulations and thank you Pat! The department will 
finally be computerized, and the system should be on line and 
running by mid February 1994, however, the problem with new 
equipment is lack of space. 

Special thanks to the men and women of the department, and 

all the Officers who put their lives on the line every day. 

By working together we can make this year even better then 
last year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley, Chief 
MEDFIELD POLICE DEPARTMENT 




The new front entrance to the Police Station 




New permanent Police Officer John Carmichael 
in front of new entrance to police station. 



36 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Statistics for 1993 are as follows: 

Accidents 230 

Accosting 1 

Ambulance Trips 365 

Animal Control Calls 234 

Armed Robbery 1 

Arrests 50 

Assaults 7 

Assists 644 

Bomb Scares 4 

Breaking and Entering 20 

Burglar Alarms 646 

Child Neglect 1 

Children Lost 1 

Children Found 1 

Civil and Family Problems 148 

Deer killed by cars 30 

Disturbance Calls 208 

Doors and Windows 36 

Fire Alarms 115 

Fires 63 

Funeral Traffic 41 

Hazard Calls 246 

Hunters 4 

Larceny 105 

Malicious Damage 17 

Messages Delivered 8 

Mischief 114 

Missing Patients-MSH 48 

Missing Patients-MSH-Returned 42 

Missing Persons 26 

Missing Persons-located 22 

Obscene Calls 1 

Protective Custody 5 

Prowlers 1 

Stolen Cars 3 

Stolen Cars recovered 3 

Sudden Deaths 5 

Summons served 114 

Suspicious Cars 77 

Suspicious Persons 70 

Suspicious Phone Calls 70 

Threats 2 

Water Complaints 5 



37 



AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Medfield Emergency Medical Technicians responded to 424 
calls in 1993. This was an increase of 23 calls over 1992. 

We would like to thank the citizens of Medfield for their 
support throughout the year as well as their contributions to 
the Ambulance Gift Fund. 

1993 was ushered in with a new ambulance, a Class I 
McCoy-Miller walk-through which allows for greater ease in 
patient care as well as a smoother ride for all. At the same 
time we updated much of our equipment including the stair 
chair, portable cot, traction splints, fracture pack, padded 
boards, long and short boards and main cot. 

In May paramedics from "LifeFlight" of Boston presented a 
class to local EMTs focusing on the role of the helicopter as 
part of the Emergency Medical Services team. The class 
included a landing of the LifeFlight helicopter at the 
Transfer Station to the delight of many of the area children 
who were on hand for the occasion. 

We would like to thank the many dedicated men and women 
who so graciously gave of their time and talents volunteering 
as EMTs to serve the Town. We also wish to express our thanks 
to the paramedics from Norwood Hospital and MetroWest Medical 
Center-Leonard Morse Campus for their assistance throughout 
the year. 

Destination of trips as follows: 

MetroWest Medical Center-Leonard Morse Campus 215 

Norwood Hospital 93 

Glover Memorial Hospital, Needham 18 

MetroWest Medical Center-Framingham Union Campus 11 

Newton-Wellesley Hospital 10 

Southwood Community Hospital 2 

LifeFlight 1 

Mutual Aid 31 

Cancelled 41 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley 
CHIEF OF POLICE 



38 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER/INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report reflects my duties as Animal Control Officer 
and Animal Inspector since the start of my position on July 1, 
1993, through the year ending December 31, 1993. 

Total Animal Control-related incidents 654 

Licensed dogs returned to their owners 118 

Number of citations issued 107 

Number of animals killed on our roadways 55 

Cats 18 

Dogs 4 

Wildlife 33 

Number of sick or injured wildlife destroyed by ACO 23 
Number of animals tested for rabies 13 

Positive results 2 

Number of dogs adopted 8 

Number of cats adopted 1 

All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the 
requirements of the Town of Medfield and the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. All of the animals and barns are in the best 
of condition. 

The following animals were counted in Medfield in 1993: 

Beef cows 10 

Donkeys 2 

Goats 2 

Horses 64 

Ponies 4 

Poultry 100+ 

Sheep 29 

Swine 1 

During 1993 Medfield had five dog bites, each one 
requiring a minimum ten-day quarantine of the animal. We also 
had two dogs and fifteen cats in quarantine or close 
observation due to receiving bites from unknown source. 

The first six months of this newly formed position have 
been very busy and I appreciate the continuing support and 
cooperation of the Town and the residents of Medfield, the 
Medfield Police Department, the Humane Society of Medfield, 
and Heritage Hill Veterinary Clinic. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer A. Shaw 
ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 
ANIMAL INSPECTOR 

39 



AFFORDABLE HOUSING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

We are excited to report that in 1993, Allendale, an 
affordable housing subdivision of 17 single-family homes, was 
completed ! 

The Medfield Community Development Corporation (MCDC) , a 
nonprofit corporation formed by Affordable Housing Committee 
members and other citizens interested in affordable housing in 
Medfield, served as the developer of Allendale. 

The last few houses were completed and sold to eligible 
families in January, 1993. In the spring, the roads, driveways 
and sidewalks received their final paving. In addition, the 
last few lawns were completed and some planting that did not 
survive the snowy winter were replaced. 

On May 22nd, exactly 9 months after the ground breaking 
ceremony, the Committee and Medfield Community Development 
Corporation held a ribbon cutting ceremony attended by Town 
and State officials, the Allendale families, their guests and 
many townspeople. The Allendale families cut the ribbon 
together and then presented Project Director Margaret "Bay" 
Bancroft with an appreciation plaque. The families also 
planted a tree in her honor. 

Following is a listing of the development team for the 
Allendale project: 

MCPC OFFICER? flnfl DIRECTORS 

President - Bonnie Wren-Burgess 
Vice President - Mary Ellen Thompson 
Treasurer - Charles Peck 
Director - Sharon Lowenthal 

MCDC MEMBERS 

Margaret Bancroft, Frank Murray, Stephen Nolan, William 
Priante, Sr., Fayre Stephenson, Michael Sullivan, Ann Thompson 

PROJECT DIRECTOR 
Margaret Bancroft 
HOUSING CONTRACTOR 

Bi It-Rite Construction, Dorchester, with Huntington Homes, 
East Montpelier, Vermont 



40 



SITE WORK CONTRACTOR 

Metro Equipment Corporation, Roxbury 

CLERK of the WORKS 

Thomas Cop it home, Medfield 

tXSQBMEl 

Stephen Nolan, Hill & Barlow, a Professional Corporation, 
Boston 

ffiSIHEEB 

Kalkunte Engineering Corporation, Stoughton 

CONSTRUCTION FINANCTW-f 

Dedham Institution for Savings 

SITE WQRK FINANCING 

Massachusetts Small Cities Program 

The Committee wishes to express its gratitude to every 
member of the development team for making the Allendale 
project an unqualified success. 

On other matters, the Committee received one informal 
inquiry regarding a possible comprehensive permit application, 
but received no formal requests for review of any 
comprehensive permit applications during the last year* 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stephen Nolan, chairperson 

Sharon Lowe n thai 

Charles Peck 

Michael Sullivan 

Ann Thompson 

Mary Ellen Thompson 

Bonnie Wren-Burgess 



41 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Council on Aging provides services to Medfield 
residents who have reached the age of 60. There are two part- 
time salaried employees: the director, and the driver of the 
mini van. Many services are provided by our valued volunteers. 

The Director's office is located at the Pfaff Center, 
which makes it conveniently available to the Seniors who have 
lunch in their dedicated room five days a week. There is a 
ramp for easy accessibility to the building. Most of the 
senior activities are held at the Pfaff Center, except for our 
field trips and the bus scheduled visits. 

In addition to the lunch program, we deliver meals on 
wheels, provide a monthly blood pressure and health 
information program administered by the Walpole VNA, a 
podiatry clinic, painting classes, crafts, and the free flu 
vaccine clinic serving all seniors over 65, and any other 
Medfield residents who have respiratory ailments. We deliver 
free Government surplus foods quarterly to all Medfield 
residents who qualify financially. We dropped the aerobic 
class due to lack of participation, but are presently planning 
a new exercise program that includes more rhythm and less 
impact . 

Many senior women enjoyed working on a project that 
provided 21 lovely Afghans to a shelter in Framingham for 
women and children. This project will continue. 

We provide free income tax services to low and medium 
income seniors through the AARP program. We recently added the 
SHINE program (Serving Health Information Needs of Elders) . We 
are fortunate to have Doug Jenkins, recently retired, and a 
Medfield resident as our SHINE advisor. He will use the 
Director's office at the Pfaff Center on Wednesday from 1:00 
until 3:00 PM, to provide services to our seniors in need of 
health insurance guidance. Doug has been trained extensively 
through the Executive Office of Elder Affairs to provide this 
service through HESSCO. 

Our director, Barbara Connors, was recently appointed to 
the HESSCO AREA AGENCY /ADVISORY COUNCIL which represents the 
directors of all the towns in the district on different issues 
or problems that might occur. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Barbara J. Connors, Director 
Ben B. Korbly, Chairman 



42 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1993 the Board of Appeals acted on the following 
applications: 

GRANTED: Special Permit for a sign at Flatley Plaza 

Three Special Permits to allow Family Apartments 
Two Special Permits for doctors' offices 
Variance from the rear yard setback requirement 
Variance from the parking requirement for the High 

School 
Modification of a previous decision regarding 

drainage 
Special permit for a water pumping station 
Variance from the corner lot setback requirement 
Two requests to withdraw applications 
Three findings that changes would not increase the 

nonconformity of a lot/use 

DENIED: Special Permit for an addition to a home in the 
Watershed Protection District 
Two variances from the rear yard setback 

requirements 
Variance from the minimum lot size requirement 

The Appeals Board would like to give its sincere thanks 
for all the support and consideration it has received this 
past year from the Town Boards and the residents of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted , 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Burgess P. Standley, Secretary 
Stephen M. Nolan, Member 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr., Associate 
Osier L. Peterson, Associate 



43 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Fiscal 1994 brought about a more active market in sales 
and in purchase prices than we experienced during the previous 
three-year period. We now enter our fiscal 1995 three-year 
reevaluation program with hopes for continued increase in the 
real estate market. Our commercial tax base was not 
encouraging; in 1993-94 we were forced to reduce the values of 
many commercial condominiums, other commercial property anfl 
personal property, always in constant flux. Fortunately this 
property class comprises less than 10% of our tax base. 

During the year we strived to maintain that base when 
threatened by Shaws Supermarkets regarding its personal 
property tax obligation. Shaws contended that its leased 
equipment was not taxable. All documentation from the 
Department of Revenue indicated the equipment was leased from 
a company also owned by Shaws for the purpose of leasing to 
its stores and therefore taxable. Town Counsel reviewed the 
information when Shaws filed with the Appellate Tax Board, 
challenging the board's denial of its application. The company 
withdrew after Peter Michelson sent interrogatories requesting 
detailed information regarding the leasing operation. The 
Board owes its gratitude to Mr. Michelson for the time and 
effort he expended to protect our decision. 

Our consulting appraiser reviewed other applications for 
abatement and appropriate adjustments were made. Although the 
board manages to keep its overlay within approved amounts, it 
also has an obligation to revise assessments where judgment or 
clerical errors have occurred. In most instances the board 
approves recommendations by appraiser Stan Bergeron whose 
expertise is based on 15 years of experience in the valuation 
of Medfield' s real property. During that time we have found 
him fair and thorough while admitting neither he nor we are 
perfect. We thank him for outstanding work that has kept 
applications and abatements to a minimum. 

The quarterly billing program continues to be effective 
in obtaining steady revenue and avoiding borrowing. 

In addition to the increased sales, increased 
construction starts have occurred on numerous, approved 
subdivisions. In 1990 the Board voted not to recommend the 
adoption of the portion of Chapter 59 permitting new 
construction on July 1 to become part of the tax base, 
continuing to use January 1 as the date of valuation as well 
as ownership. Due to slow construction, an additional burden 
on our appraiser during our 1991 reevaluation did not seem 
necessary. This year we think it would be worthwhile and we 
plan to submit an article for your approval of this local 
option section because we believe it will increase our tax 



44 



base substantially. 

We are pleased to report that the action taken by Town 
Meeting two years ago, increasing allowable limits to qualify 
for tax deferral, made no appreciable difference in the 
numbers applying and qualifying, as many feared. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C.B. Doub, Chairman 
Carol A. Rossi, Clerk 
William D. Walsh 



ARCHITECTUAL BARRIERS 
COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield; 

No formal meetings were held this past year. The 
architect for the library renovations did meet with members of 
the Committee concerning handicapped accessibility. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Christie A. Shoop 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 
Bruno J. Palumbo 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Beverly Hallowell 



45 



CABLE TELEVISION COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Cable Television Committee was very busy during 1993. 
Several important matters required our attention: 

1. The Federal Cable Act of 1992 substantially changed the 
laws that regulate cable television. Most notable to 
subscribers were the changes in how services are billed, 
which, for many people last fall, meant an increase in the 
cost of cable television. So much for the "benefits" of 
reregulation predicted by proponents of the new law. 

2. The Town of Medfield had to choose between regulating, or 
not regulating cable television rates to subscribers on its 
behalf. In view of the high level of expertise required and 
the high administrative costs that the Town would have to bear 
to do its own regulation, we recommended, and the Selectmen 
appointed, the State's Cable Television Regulatory Commission 
to regulate cable rates in Medfield, in conformity with most 
other towns in the Commonwealth. 

3. The Town's cable television license with Cablevision 
Industries ("CVI") expires in 1995. Procedures governing 
renewal of cable licenses are highly regulated by federal and 
state law. In late 1992, we started the process to prepare for 
renewal negotiations. In early 1993, Bill Kean drafted a 
survey of subscribers seeking their perspective on the quality 
and value of their cable television service. A good sampling 
was obtained. When results were tabulated, they suggested that 
people were, in general, satisfied with cable television, 
although areas of improvement could be addressed. There was, 
however, general unhappiness with the cost of service. 

In March, 1993, a public forum was held in the 
Selectmen's room and telecast live on cable channel 6. Mr. 
Steve Grossman, General Manager of CVI in Foxboro, was our 
guest. We reviewed with him the results of the survey and 
received his comments. He also answered questions from the 
live and television audience. We feel the process was 
successful, in that both the committee and CVI better 
understood Medfield' s needs and we all received CVI's 
perspective on problems raised. Thank you Bill Kean, for all 
your hard work on the survey. 

Since the forum, we have been meeting regularly to 
prepare for negotiations with CVI. We met with a law firm who 
wants to represent Medfield in the negotiations. Although we 
felt the cost was too high, we have left the door open for a I 
lesser, consulting arrangement. Thanks to a grant from Cable 
8, we have acquired a legal subscription service, "The Cable 
Reregulation Handbook" , to assist us in trying to keep abreast 
of regulatory developments in Washington. Thank you, Cable 8! 

46 



Because of all of the upheaval associated with the Cable 
Act of 1992, we have adopted a "wait and see" approach to the 
law and its potential effect on renewal. Thus we foresee the 
bulk of negotiation occurring in the latter half of 1994. We 
believe we are in position to obtain the best possible terms 
for renewal, available under the law. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert Sawyer, Chairman 
C . B . Doub 
Robert Gibbs 
William Kean 
Thomas Sweeney 

CABLE TV COMMITTEE 




Holiday tree lighting on the town common. 
(Photo courtesy of Medfield Suburban Press.) 



47 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Civil Defense 
Director for the year ending December 31, 1993. 

The Civil Defense Director's responsibilities are to act 
as a liaison between the Selectmen and the Town Departments in 
the event of a declared emergency. As of 1988 , the Civil 
Defense Director has actively participated in the HAZMAT 
Emergency Planning Committee in and outside of the town. 

The Civil Defense Director is also in charge of the 
Auxiliary Police Organization under the Chief of Police. 

In addition to our compulsory drills on July 4th and 
Halloween, the Auxiliary Police and Radio operators were 
requested to assist in the following events during 1993: 

- Memorial Day Parade 

- Annual Road Race 

- Medfield Day (MEMO) 

- Christmas Parade 

In addition to the above, the department was called upon 
to provide assistance during the March 12th snowstorm. A 
shelter was manned at the Middle School; a radio 
communications link with the Massachusetts Emergency 
Management Agency (MEMA) was established and maintained; and 
assistance was provided to the police department. Manpower 
and emergency vehicles were used in the patrol of the town, 
damage assessment, and traffic control. 

I wish to remind the people of Medfield that in an 
emergency it is possible to arrange for shelter and showers at 
one of the schools. 

Town residents interested in making use of our Civil 
Defense services or in membership should contact the Civil 
Defense Director at 359-4519. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the Auxiliary 
Police for their cooperation throughout the year. Also, I 
wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, Michael Sullivan and his 
staff, and Police Chief Hurley. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Vincent M. Cellucci 
CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 



48 



■i* A? 







Civil Defense Auxiliary Police Officers getting 
ready to go on duty. 




Civil Defense Officers Patrick and Judith Harris were 
recognized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Board 
of Selectmen for their efforts during a winter storm. 



49 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

We are pleased to advise that the expansion of the 
cemetery towards Bridge Street is continuing and we expect 
some major improvements in 1994. 

In 1993, we continued to replace the old and diseased 
trees, as well as trees damaged during the storms, with new 
trees. We were also able to resurface four roadways in August 
of 1993. 



1993 



There were 48 burials, 7 cremations, and 52 lots sold in 



Respectfully submitted, 



Eric W. O'Brien, Chairman 
David McCue 
Walter Reynolds 




Participants in the Memorial Day Exercises at the Cemetery Pond 
casting flowers on water in honor of those lost at sea. 



50 



CULTURAL COUNCIL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Cultural Council (formerly Council on Arts) 
continued to play an active role in the Town in 1993. 

In 1993 the Council awarded six grants in the total sum 
of $2,343. The grant monies awarded by the state are now on a 
yearly cycle because of cutbacks in the program at the state 
level. In 1993 the grants included funding for a Family 
Concert held in the summer. Partial funding also went to the 
Very Special Arts Adult Festival and the Neponset Choral 
Society. The Zullo Gallery and the Council Theater group both 
received grants. 

Although the Zullo Gallery on Main Street is closed 
temporarily, the Council continues to keep the space available 
for community needs. In 1993 the gallery held a multi-artist 
show which included both 2-D and 3-D works. This was funded 
partially by a Cultural Council Grant. The theater group has 
utilized the space for rehearsals and has plans for a series 
of one-act plays to be performed at the gallery. We hope to 
see the Zullo Gallery reopening soon as an art gallery. 

In September 1993 the Council Theater Group produced "The 
Dining Room" by A.R. Gurney. It was well received at both 
Medfield High School and at The Walpole Footlighter's 
playhouse. 

The Cultural Council continues to seek input from any 
interested members of the community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lucinda Davis, Chairperson 

MEDFIELD CULTURAL COUNCIL 



51 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission administers the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 
131, sec. 40, and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw. Among other 
things, these laws seek to protect public surface and 
groundwater supplies and prevent damage from flooding by 
preserving land that floods and nature 1 s great filters and 
sponges, our wetlands — swamps and bogs, streams and other 
water bodies, and certain types of land adjoining them. 
Anyone proposing to alter in any way a wetland or land 
subject to flooding, or to perform work within 100 feet of 
either, must file with the Commission a Request for a 
Determination of Applicability or a Notice of Intent and 
before starting the work must receive a Determination that 
the Act does not apply, a Determination that the Act 
applies and may be performed under conditions the 
Commission imposes, a Determination that the Act applies 
and may be performed without any conditions, or an Order of 
Conditions (a detailed permit) . The Order of Conditions 
must be recorded and imposes a lien on the property. When 
the work has been completed satisfactorily under the Order 
of Conditions, the Commission may vote to issue a release 
of the lien, called a Certificate of Compliance. 

Under the Bylaw, an applicant who will not complete 
work within one year from the date the Order of Conditions 
was issued must request an extension of the Order, or else 
the Order will lapse and the work must halt. 

By issuing an Enforcement Order, the Commission may 
compel anyone violating the Act or the Bylaw to stop the 
violating activity and to perform whatever work is 
necessary to bring the site into compliance with the Act or 
Bylaw. Violators are subject to imprisonment for up to two 
years and a penalty of up to $25,000 for each violation. 

In 1993, the Commission issued 24 Orders of 
Conditions, 7 Determinations of Applicability, 23 
Certificates of Compliance, and 3 Enforcement Orders. 

In May 1993 we hired Leslee A. Willitts as the town's 
first Conservation Officer. Leslee works part-time and 
holds office hours in the Town House (phone: 359-8505) on 
Mondays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. She 
conducts site inspections, fields questions from residents 
and applicants, gives guidance about procedures applicants 
should follow, provides procedural and technical advice to 
the Commission, and helps prepare many of the documents we 
issue. Her expertise, dedication, enthusiasm, and pluck 
are invaluable to us. 



52 



Leslee's wages are paid from a fee regulation we 
enacted in September 1992 under the Wetlands Bylaw. Anyone 
filing an application or request under the Bylaw must pay 
a fee as set forth in the regulation. 

Both the fee regulation and the hiring of Leslee are 
largely the work of Denise Yurkofsky, a member of the 
Commission until June 1993. We thank Denise for the energy 
and resourcefulness she lent the Commission, and are happy 
that she continues to donate her considerable talents to 
the town as a member of other town boards. 

This past year has seen pitched concern about 
development in town, and rightly so. Development gobbles 
up our open space, fills our roads with more vehicles, and 
burdens our municipal services. It also puts stress on our 
water resources: the more roads and houses, the more run- 
off; the less open space, the greater the load on wetlands 
and the less their ability to neutralize contaminants; the 
more faucets, toilets, and tubs, the greater the chance 
water is being drawn from our aquifers faster than they are 
being replenished. We saw how many hours the Selectmen, 
the Water and Sewerage Board, and other town officials had 
to spend in 1993 in the planning and approval of the new 
town well on the Charles River near the Route 27 bridge 
into Sherborn. What will happen if degradation of our 
groundwater forces us to shut down existing wells or one of 
the two existing well fields? How long will Medfield be 
able to tap its aquifers for its water supply rather than 
having to tie into the expensive MWRA system? 

No one is more painfully aware of the alarming loss of 
open land in the past five years than the Commission. Our 
not always happy duty is to walk many of the remaining open 
parcels in town after they have been acquired by developers 
and the developers have submitted plans to us as part of 
their applications. 

Our jurisdiction is limited, however. We cannot deny 
an application under the Act or Bylaw simply because we 
would rather see a parcel left undeveloped. Denial of 
applications for reasons other than those set forth in the 
Wetlands Protection Act, the detailed Department of 
Environmental Protection regulations issued under the Act, 
or the Wetlands Bylaw could constitute a "taking" under the 
federal and state Constitutions, which require that a 
governmental body pay a landowner if it wishes to 
appropriate his land for its own purposes. Under its 
"police power," the government may prevent an activity or 
a use of land that poses a risk to the public health, 
safety, or welfare — this is the legal basis of the Act and 
Bylaw — but it must be prepared to acquire land through the 
exercise of its eminent domain power if what it really 
seeks to do is not to prevent a public harm, such as damage 
to wetlands, but to create a public benefit, such as 
preventing development or preserving open space. 



53 



The best way to preserve land is to buy it and 
dedicate it to conservation purposes. We fully support 
efforts to request residents at Town Meeting to appropriate 
money so that the town can acquire undeveloped parcels. 
But there are other options available that would not 
require the town to make large expenditures. If you own a 
parcel of land in town, consider following others who have 
generously donated land to the town for conservation. 
You'll reap tax benefits and endow the town with a lasting 
legacy. If you're selling a large parcel, consider 
imposing a deed restriction on it, one, for example, that 
will prevent the buyer from chopping up the parcel into so 
many house lots. Or give a conservation restriction to the 
town. You retain the land but agree to accept certain 
restrictions on its use, most typically, keeping it in its 
natural state. You benefit by reducing various taxes 
significantly. Call to set up a meeting with us if you are 
interested in using any of these preservation devices. 

But even if we could roll back recent development 
projects or freeze open land from development, we would 
still need to safeguard our water resources by protecting 
our wetlands. One way is to uphold the Wetlands Protection 
Act and Wetlands Bylaw. Seemingly small measures required 
by these laws add up. For example, in 1993 the Highway 
Department rebuilt a drain line from a catch basin near 
Mill Brook, sending the overflow of the catch basin onto a 
bed of broken stone rather than directly into the brook. 
The new system will prevent erosion of the banks and 
siltation of the brook and adjacent wetlands, which are 
part of the watershed containing town wells 3, 4, and 5. 
And the Park and Recreation Commission retained an 
engineering firm to prepare sound and detailed plans for 
cleaning Hinckley and Baker's Ponds in a way that will 
reduce the danger that silt and other contaminants will 
enter Vine Brook, which flows into the Charles River a 
short way upstream from town wells 1 and 2. 

Other issues need to be addressed, especially the 
problem of septic fields and cesspools. Cesspools work by 
draining untreated effluent towards our water table, which 
is very high in many places. Septic fields often fail. 
Pass through parts of town and you'll smell sewage — break- 
out from cesspools or septic fields, effluent spreading 
horizontally from them into brooks, swamps, and ponds. 
Even if you are not experiencing problems with your 
cesspool or septic field, it may still be harming our water 
supply. 

The January 4, 1994 Selectmen's meeting on this issue, 
at which the Selectmen established a joint committee of 
members of various town boards, is a much-needed step 
towards resolving this problem. We have hundreds of septic 
fields and cesspools in town, many of them in neighborhoods 
serviced by sewer lines. If your house has a septic field 
or cesspool and a sewer line passes by the lot, we exhort 
you to connect to it. You'll be adding to the value of 

54 



your house and eliminating a distinct threat to our water 
supply and public health. The Wetlands Protection Act and 
Wetlands Bylaw seek to protect groundwater but exempt 
sewers and cesspools from our jurisdiction. Sadly, all the 
measures the Commission is required to take to protect 
water resources — preventing the filling of wetlands, 
limiting work in the 100-foot buffer zone from wetlands, 
controlling run-off to prevent siltation of water bodies, 
etc. — are wasted if our groundwater and surface water 
continue to be contaminated with sewage and household 
chemicals. We urge the Selectmen to require houses along 
sewer lines to connect to them by a specified, not too 
distant deadline, one that reflects the fact that these 
sewer lines have been in place for years. And we support 
extending sewer lines, especially into neighborhoods 
currently experiencing problems and those in critical 
watersheds . 

The town also needs to tighten various bylaws. The 
developer of the Southern Acres subdivision on South Street 
clear-cut nearly the entire site. In doing so without 
providing adequate erosion controls, it violated federal 
regulations as well as the Wetlands Protection Act and 
Wetlands Bylaw. (Only a small portion of the site came 
under our jurisdiction until after the siltation of the 
wetlands had occurred.) After a heavy rainstorm in early 
December 1993, mocha-colored streams of silt-laden runoff 
flowed into the Stop River, the unnamed brook running 
parallel to Granite Street and ending at Danielson Pond, 
and the wetlands associated with both streams. We issued 
an Enforcement Order requiring stabilization of the site 
and a clean-up of the wetlands. Inspections of the site by 
the Conservation Officer and by Commission members, follow- 
up hearings, and updating the Enforcement Order and related 
documents have taken up a disproportionate amount of our 
time since December 1993. Our subdivision and wetlands 
bylaws and regulations should require that a certain amount 
of natural vegetation be left intact, especially on slopes, 
and that development be performed in manageable phases. 

We hope to re-write the Wetlands Bylaw and pass new 
regulations to address these and other issues. For 
example, recent studies have demonstrated that if upland 
within 50 feet of wetlands is disturbed, the wetlands will 
be degraded by bacteria and viruses in run-off. The 
Department of Environmental Protection has not amended its 
wetlands regulations and is urging towns to impose a 
discretionary 50-foot no-build zone through their wetlands 
bylaws. A strong bylaw is vital to protecting our 
wetlands. It will take a great deal of effort to write an 
effective, sound one, including careful review of legal 
issues and studies by wetlands scientists. We trust we 
will have strong support when we present a new version to 
other town boards and to Town Meeting. 



55 



We welcome anyone interested in helping to preserve 
wetlands, our water supply, and open space. We can add as 
many associate members as wish to help out. We especially 
need persons interested in educating landowners about land 
preservation techniques and coordinating with other Town 
boards about this and other pressing issues. We meet in 
the Town House the first and third Thursdays of each month 
at 7:30 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Craig S. Harwood, 
Chairman 

John A. Thompson, 

Vice Chairman 
Ann Lee Howell 
Robert J. Ingram 
Ralph A. Parmigiane 
Douglas S. Sparrow 
Caroline D. Standley 
Theresa A. Cos, 

Associate Member 
Betty A. Kaerwer, 

Associate Member 
Scott D. Pitz, 

Associate Member 
James 6. White, Jr., 
Associate Member 
and Treasurer 



56 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



;To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

jThe calendar year of 1993 again showed continuing growth in 

I the workload for the Board of Health agents, staff members 

I and our contracting agencies. Complicated repairs of septic 

i systems constructed prior to Title 5 and the possibility of 

i new requirements of Title 5 found our consulting 

j agent/engineer spending more time supplying information and 

[ on consulting services. Our Sanitary Inspector likewise 

supplied many hours of consulting services to prospective 

business developers of food service establishments and to 

the School Building and Planning Committee for renovations 

proposed for the High School. 

SANITATION: John J. Keefe R.S. has served as Board of 
Health agent for nineteen years. As agent for the board, he 
continued to make inspections of food service establishments 
and retail food stores, to give consultation and advice when 
requested and to investigate food related complaints. Public 
health issues dealing with school, highway, town 
administrative, police, fire and State Hospital personnel 
throughout the year received consultation time with Mr. 
Keefe. 

Under the provision of Chapter II of the State Sanitary Code 
covering minimum standards for human habitation, Mr. Keefe 
made inspections of dwelling units during the year which 
resulted from complaints and random inspections of rental 
housing. Where violations of the State Sanitary Code were 
found, the owner or occupant was ordered to take corrective 
action and follow-up inspections were made to insure 
compliance. Mr. Keefe also made miscellaneous inspections 
which included the public bathing beach, semi public pools, 
laundromats, gas stations, shopping centers, and the 
transfer station. Regular inspections of school cafeterias 
and nursery schools were carried out throughout the year. 

The Board of Health, recognizing their responsibility to 
protect and improve the health of the residents of the town, 
adopted Regulations in 1992 dealing with smoking in public 
places and work places and with the sale and distribution of 
tobacco products. These regulations called for all 
restaurants to be smoke-free by January 1, 1994. The end of 
1993 already found compliance by 10 of the 13 Food Service 
permit holders. 

The Board of Health, joined with Boards of Health from the 
towns of Needham, Dover and Westwood to apply for a grant 
made available from the new tax on cigarettes. The 
consortium was awarded an $85,000 grant for examination of 
tobacco usage in the four towns. The purpose of this 
examination will be to develop and implement a plan that 

57 



will reduce both the frequency of initiation and th 
incidence of smoking among the residents. A 12 member 
Tobacco Advisory Committee was established witfc 
representatives from the Boards of Health and twc 
individuals appointed by each town's Board of Health, 
full time Program Director has been hired and office spac 
has been provided by the Town of Needham. 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED: 

Food Service Permit (includes restaurants , 
counter bars, cafeteria food service 

and vending machines) 20 

Food stores and markets 8 

Temporary food service permits 7 

Bakeries 1 

Laundromats 1 

Funeral Director 1 

Tanning Facilities 1 

Limited food service (party room) 1 

Mobile Food Server 1 

Frozen dessert 2 

Ice cream truck 1 

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING: 

As the town continues to experience growth and the number of 
residences increases, the load on our environment increases 
Recognizing this, the Board of Health has continued to bei 
active in cooperation with other boards and committees, 
stressing the need for proper management of the town's 
natural resources, particularly, the protection of our water 
resources. 

Our agent and consulting professional engineer, William R. 
Domey, has provided engineering assistance to town 
residents, reviewed plans for future development and met 
with other town boards and commissions. With storm water 
management regulations in effect, reviews of subdivision 
plans, for septic system designs for new construction, 
proposals for repairs of existing systems and drainage 
details for site plan review afford a greater protection of 
the environment. Such reviews constitute some of the many 
services rendered by the board engineer. In order to 
determine if sewage disposal systems are adequate for 
proposed alterations or additions to existing dwellings, the 
board adopted guidelines to obtain building permits and for 
inspections of existing septic systems to determine if they 
are in a state of failure. 

The following is a list of number of reviews and inspections 
and related permits issued: 

On-site soil tests 57 

New plans submitted 67 

Disposal Works Construction Permits issued 54 

Construction inspections 148 

Repair permits issued 7 

58 



Installers' permits issued 28 

Subdivision plan reviews 3 plans 

(Preliminary & Definitive) 

Well permits issued 4 

Septage Handler & Carters' permits issued 23 

Swimming pool reviews (private pools) 12 
Review of plans for additions & renovations 67 

Review of septic system repair plans 51 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

The 1993 Annual Town Meeting voted to reinstate the position 
of Animal Control Officer as a combined position with that 
of Animal Inspector. Jennifer Shaw, who has served as the 
town's Animal Inspector continues her dedicated service in 
the new combined position. Her report is contained 
[separately in this Town Report. 

The threat of a Rabies epidemic has become a reality in 
Medfield with the identification of positive rabies cases in 
raccoons. The board continued their program to educate the 
citizens of the town to the disease, to the importance of 
staying away from wild animals and of having their domestic 
pets, especially cats, vaccinated. They also arranged for 
pre-exposure inoculations of all town personnel who might be 
exposed to possible rabid animals. The board cosponsored two 
clinics with the Medfield Humane Society, for the 
vaccination of cats and dogs. 

CONTRACTS WITH HUMAN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

The South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens 
is a nonprofit membership-based organization of more than 
350 members, governed by family members of those served, 
including community residents on the Board of Directors. 
SNCARC has been serving the community of Medfield since 1954 
and has been financially supported with a donation from 
Medfield since 1972. Eight types of programs serve Medfield 
residents as follows: 

1. Vocational Training through Lifeworks Employment 
Services in Norwood; 

2. Lifeworks Day Habilitation and NCE Pre-vocational 
program in Norwood; 

3. Community Residential Facilities serving Medfield 
residents; 

4. Family Support/Advocacy to all Medfield families 
who request; 

5. Social Recreational and Special Olympic for 9 
residents with disabilities; 

6. Respite care in Medfield families' homes in their 
homes, plus afterschool, weekends, and summer 
camp programs for Medfield children; 

7. Elder Services to Medfield citizens who are 
elderly and disabled; 

8. Clinical Services through Harbor counselling. 



59 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association serves the Board 
of Health in the capacity of public health nursing services 
for the residents of Medfield. This agency has had a slowing 
of the tremendous visit growth of the last four years, with 
the only increase in visits in 1993 being in the area of 
home health aides. WVNA continues to have excellent 
availability of staff and has been able to recruit therapy 
staff to meet patient needs at a time when many hospitals 
and other VNAs are forced to establish waiting lists for 
patients requiring therapy. Also, there is no waiting list 
for home health aide services. In addition to established 
services, WVNA increased its offerings of childbirth 
education classes, breast-feeding classes, prenatal and 
postnatal exercise classes, and cholesterol screenings. The 
Infant/Toddler Safety Class and CPR certification has been 
very popular, especially with new parents. A new 
Breast-feeding Hotline was established in late fall. Office 
hours are held daily at the Walpole, 55 West Street, office. 
The new Mental Health Program started in 1991, offering 
psychiatric nursing care to clients with mental health 
problems who are having difficulty coping and are unable to 
access existing services continues to expand. WVNA continues 
to provide programs in Health Promotion in addition to 
traditional home health services. The four major components 
of the Health Promotion Program are: Health Maintenance for 
the Elderly; Maternal/Child Health; Communicable Disease and 
Public Health. 

The Town of Medfield Public Health Statistics for 1993 are 
as follows: 

SERVICE 



Home Visits/Health Maintenance 

Maternal/Child Health Visits 

Office Visits 

Communicable Disease Follow-Up 

Senior Citizen Clinics 

Flu Clinic 

OUTREACH PROGRAM 

The Medfield Youth Outreach program, administered by the 
Board of Health and advised by the Outreach Advisory 
Committee, continues to be a program supported by the town. 
The focus of the Outreach position has traditionally been 
and remains crisis intervention and prevention, short and 
some long term counseling, information and referrals, 
community and client liaison, advocacy, and the Peer 
Counseling/Leadership program. The confidential services 
are offered free of charge to Medfield youth and their 
families. Elizabeth Newton completed her third year as 
director of the program in October. 

1993 was an exciting year for the Outreach Program. The 

60 



VISITS 


VISITS 


1993 


1992 


134 


128 


5 


18 


38 


58 


10 


1 


219 


283 


257 


305 



first annual All Night Graduation Party was held for MHS's 
graduating class of '93. It was a enormous success, with 96 
out of 105 graduates attending. The Outreach Worker acted 
as a catalyst to organize the committee and continued to 
work with the committee throughout the year. Other 
activities included the Outreach Worker co-facilitating the 
parent training program "It Takes a Village to Raise a 
Child" for the second year. The office also served as a 
site for eligible Medfield residents to apply for the South 
Middlesex Opportunity Council and Good Neighbor fuel 
assistance programs. The Outreach Worker reinitiated and 
co-facilitated the Medfield Alcohol and Other Drug Advisory 
Council (MAODAC) which also serves the schools in the 
capacity of the Health Advisory Council. The Board of 
Health utilized the Outreach Worker to help with the 
application of the tobacco tax health grant, which was 
approved by the Department of Public Health. A new role for 
the Outreach Worker in 1993 developed when the schools asked 
her to serve as one of the sexual harassment designees in 
the new sexual harassment policy. For the second year, the 
Medfield Women's Association generously donated funds to 
help the outreach office update resources and referral 
materials. 

In 1993 clients were referred to the Outreach office by the 
schools (28%), police (8%), family members (14%), self 
(38%), and other sources (12%) including clergy, local 
professionals, and state agencies. In most cases concerning 
minor children, parents or other family members became 
involved in meetings. Consultation with school personnel, 
police, other service providers, and community agencies also 
occurred. Major issues dealt with throughout the calendar 
year included: 



anxiety/ stress 
parenting issues 
eating disorder 
financial difficulties 
aggression/violence 
self esteem issues 
suicidal ideation 
abandonment 
legal issues 



separation/divorce 

eviction 

substance abuse 

depression 

parental alcoholism 

unemployment 

child/parent conflicts 

abuse 



The Peer Counseling program continues to be a success. 
Students are trained to provide assistance, support and 
improved listening skills for peers in town. After 
training, Peer Counselors are available to help orientate 
all new students to the high school, including the freshmen 
class and to work with younger students on a "Big Buddy" 
capacity. The Outreach Worker is responsible for recruiting 
and selecting all Peer Counselors, developing and 
administering all training and meetings and has overall 
supervision of the program consulting with individual Peer 
Counselors as they work with their peers. The Outreach 
Worker also shares equal responsibility in leading the Peer 



61 



Leadership program which involves the Peer Counselors and 
Peer Educators (a drug and alcohol program in the high 
school) . 

The Outreach Worker participates in a number of 
organizations on a regular basis including: Association of 
Municipal Administrators of Youth and Family Services 
(AMAYFS) , Youth Advisory Committee, the Medf ield Hom< 
Committee, the All Night Graduation Party Committee, and has 
been elected onto the Board of Directors of the- 
Massachusetts Peer Helpers Association. Clinical 
supervision is provided by-monthly by Dimension House 
counselor, Thomas Hughart. 

The Outreach office is located on the upper second floor of 
the Town Hall. The telephone number is 359-7121 and 
messages may be left 24 hours a day. Informational 
brochures on a variety of issues are available at the 
office. 

The Board of Health holds its meetings on the first and 
third Wednesday evenings at 6:30 P.M. on the second floor of 
Town Hall. These meetings are open to the public and 
citizens are invited to attend and participate. 

• 
Respectfully submitted, 



Neil D. MacKenzie, Chairman 
Heidi Groff, Clerk 
Joan F. Willgohs 



62 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Let us begin this 1993 report by clarifying a point of 
widespread confusion: the Medfield Historical Commission and 
the Medfield Historical Society are not the same thing; they 
are two different but complementary organizations. 

The Historical Commission is appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen, has an annual budget of $600, and has certain 
statutory authority. Its monthly meetings in the Town Hall, 
usually on the second or third Wednesday of each month, are 
open to the public. 

The Historical Society is a private, not-for-profit 
organization; its membership includes Medfield history buffs 
across the country. The society holds monthly meeting/programs 
in the vestry of the Unitarian church (which is in the 
National Register of Historic Places) . The Historical Society 
building behind the library on Pleasant Street is open for 
historical research and good fellowship most Saturday 
mornings . 

The Massachusetts Historical Commission was established 
by the state legislature in 1963 to identify, evaluate, and 
protect important historical and archaeological assets in the 
commonwealth. The local historical commission is the municipal 
agency responsible for ensuring that preservation concerns are 
considered in community planning and development decisions. 
The Medfield Historical Commission was established in 1973; 
Donald MacDonald is a charter member. 

Demolition Delay Bvlaw 

Although we regard Medfield as a beautiful town, we felt 
that, like most other communities, the wrecking ball and the 
Sherman tank have claimed buildings which should have been 
preserved. Accordingly, we proposed a demolition delay bylaw, 
similar to those in many other Massachusetts cities and towns. 
It was passed by the voters at the 1993 Annual Town Meeting. 
The new bylaw prescribes hearings and other procedures to 
assure no historically significant structure is torn down 
before serious efforts have been made to rehabilitate or 
restore it. 

As this report is written, three buildings have come up 
for consideration as a result of this bylaw. The commission 
found no historical value to two of the structures, so the 
building inspector issued demolition permits without delay. 
However, the commission felt that the old Pine Tree Farm barn 
on Route 27 opposite Plain Street was preferably preserved and 
invoked the demolition delay bylaw after a hearing in 
November, 1993. The Selectmen upheld the demolition delay when 

63 



the owner appealed. 

At the 1994 Annual Town Meeting, we plan to offer an 
amendment to the demolition delay bylaw that will afford some 
protection for archaeological sensitive sites. We are seeking 
residents who would like to serve on our new archaeological 
subcommittee . 

Medfield State Hospital 

In 1994 the Historical Commission and the Historical 
District Commission are proposing that Medfield State 
Hospital's 228-acre campus be designated an Historic District. 
If approved by voters at the 1994 Town Meeting, the action 
would give the town some control over the future of the 
buildings and land. 

Historic Preservation Award 

Last summer, with our Annual Historic Preservation award, 
the commission honored the excellent work of Peter and 
Jennifer Kennedy in performing adaptive restoration of the 
former St. Edward's parsonage, which had been moved from Main 
Street to Green Street. 

Medfield Town Archives 

One of the Historical Commission's very-long-term goals 
is to establish a town archives. In 1993 the commission's 
archives subcommittee (Deborah Kelsey, Richard Reinemann, and 
David Wilmarth) began cataloging the contents of the Town Hall 
safe. Records (including many duplicates go all the way back 
to 1651, although there appears to be a gap between 1840 and 
1865. 

We Want Your Participation 

We sometimes have turnover in the commission as members' 
personal circumstances change. We always try first to fill 
vacancies from the ranks of the Associate Members. There is no 
limit to the number of associate members we can have. Let us 
know if you would like to be appointed. The only requirements 
are an interest in local history, and Medfield residency. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Burgess P. Standley, Chairman 

Paul E. Nyren, Treasurer 

Priscilla Batting, Secretary 

Deborah Kelsey 

Donald J. MacDonald 

Richard L. Reinemann 

David F. Temple 

Eleanor Anes, Associate Member 

Richard DeSorgher, Associate Member 

John Hooper, Associate Member 

David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 



64 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its 
Annual Report for 1994. 

The Authority is authorized by and operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 12 IB of the Massachusetts General Laws. 
It is entirely funded through the Executive Office of 
Communities and Development and is responsible to EOCD for the 
management of elder /disabled housing. 

There were many changes in the Medfield Housing Authority 
during the year 1993. Diane Nightingale resigned from the 
Board and Marie Roberts, Executive Director, took an early 
retirement. Additionally, L. Paul Galante, Jr. resigned from 
the Board when his wife, Louise R. Galante was appointed to 
the position of Executive Director. 

New Board members and their terms are as follows: 

Member Term Expiration 

Richard D. Jordan 1999 

James T. Regan 1998 

Janelle Schveighoffer 1996 

Mary E. Rogers 1995 

Valerie Mariani (State Appointee) 9/10/96 

The Medfield Housing Authority meets regularly on the 
second Wednesday of each month at 7:30 P.M. in the office of 
the Executive Director at Tilden Village. The general public 
is welcome to attend these meetings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Jordan, Chairman 
James T. Regan, Treasurer 
Janelle Schveighoffer, Secretary 
Mary E. Rogers, Commissioner 
Valerie Mariani, Commissioners 



65 



INCOME 


EXPENSES 


1992 1993 


1992 1993 


50,499 79,939 


23,743 




28,973 


9,315 12,892 


4,656 




5,077 


3,803 5,569 


2,627 




3,016 


16,055 20,458 


11,085 




13,024 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1993: 

DEPARTMENT PERMITS INSPECTIONS 
1992 1993 1992 1993 

BUILDING 284 299 908 1256 

PLUMBING 169 207 241 281 

GAS 116 179 146 167 

WIRING 272 330 613 712 



Total inspection revenue from the issuance of permits 
and fees for for the calendar year 1993 was $118,858.00 as 
compared to $79,672.00 in 1992. Expenses for 1993 were 
$50,090.00 as compared to $42,111.00 in 1992 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 79 

Multi Family (Condos) 8 

Complete partially finished single dwellings 1 

Additions to private dwellings 54 

Renovations to private dwellings 68 
Additions & renovations to business and 

industrial buildings 15 

A New industrial/business buildings 

Family apartments 1 

Two-Family apartments 

Reshingling roof & installation of sidewalls 17 

Private swimming pools 12 

Accessory buildings 16 

Residential garages 2 

Demolitions 3 

Tents (temporary) & construction trailers 2 

Signs 8 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/ chimneys) 12 

Carnival 1 

TOTAL 299 



66 



Occupancy certificates were issued for 39 new residences 
in 1993 as compared to 32 in 1992. 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, 
multi-family dwellings, nursing homes and nursery schools 
amounted to 9 inspections for 1993. 

Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 

1992 1993 

New dwellings 8,283,000 14,714,530 

Renovatons & additions, pools, 

shingling, sidewalls, etc. on 

residential buildings 3,004,184 2,207,819 

New construction business 

and industry 10,000 -0- 

Renovations & additions business 

and industry 321,500 1,346,085 

Multi-family buildings 725,000 1,080,000 

Two-family dwellings 200,000 -0- 

Family apartments -0- 19,000 

Enforcement of the State Building Code continues to be the 
responsibility of the local building inspectors. Legislation 
effective 7/1/92 requiring contractors to be registered with 
the Commonwealth became the responsibility of the Inspection 
Department staff to institute procedural changes for 
compliance. The office of the Inspection Department also 
keeps an accurate registration of builders holding State 
Construction Supervisor's licenses in order to assure 
compliance with Section 109.1.1 of the State Building Code. 
The building inspectors continue the enforcement of the code 
by making inspections of schools, churches and rest homes 
as well as other places of assembly on periodic basis. 

The Inspector of Buildings also serves the town in the 
capacity of Enforcing Officer for Zoning and as such made 38 
inspections to investigate complaints and inquiries brought 
to his attention both by residents as well as other town 
board and departments. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury 
during inspections was greatly appreciated. The Fire Chief 
and the Inspectors continue to inspect smoke detectors in 
new construction and in additions and renovations as well as 
inspecting the installation of solid fuel burning 
applicances. Residents are reminded of the importance of 
having their wood stove installations inspected and 
certified in accordance with requirements of the 
Massachusetts State Building Code. 



67 



PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas: 
Inspector is to administer, investigate and enforce the 
Uniform State Plumbing Code and State Fuel Gas Code. Unlike 
other trades, homeowners cannot be issued plumbing or gas 
permits. They can only be issued to a licensed Journeyman 
or a Master Plumber. Plumbing or gas cannot be installed, 
altered, removed, replaced, or repaired until a permit has 
been issued by the Inspector of Plumbing or Gas. The 
inspection department will be glad to help you make the 
determination concerning the need for plumbing and gas 
permits. When a citizen of the town requests the plumber or 
gas fitter to apply for a permit, he is getting the 
assurance that the installation will not only be installed 
correctly and safely, but also that the work will be 
installed by a professional and not exploited by 
non-professionals. It is definitely in the homeowners 
interest to insist on inspections by qualified town 
inspectors knowledgeable in their trade. It is money well 
spent in times where every penny counts. All inspectors are 
issued Medfield Photo Identification Cards, remember to ask 
them for their I.D. before allowing them to enter your home. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and ; 
upgraded to try to give the consumer and the plumber a 
direction that will assure a safe installation. Of great 
concern lately is the installation of backflow prevention 
devices where necessary to insure the continuance of the 
good clean potable water of which we are very proud in? 
Medfield. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the 
Massachusetts Electric Code as well as the National Electric 
Code in his inspections of electric installations for which 
permits are issued. Residents are reminded that the 
permitting process is in effect to assure safe and correct 
installations. The inspectors spend many hours giving 
answers to questions and advice to homeowners relative to 
electrical work. The assistance of Tauno Aalto and James 
Leonard during the periodic absences of the Wiring Inspector 
was greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 
John P. O' Toole, Inspecto of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Local Insp. of Buildings 
Joseph F. Erskine, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 



68 



KINGSBURY POND COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The first meeting of the 1993 season was held on January 
21. Among the items discussed was the question as to the 
proper speed and operating direction of the turbine and 
millstone. In this regard, and in an effort to gain more 
knowledge of the operation of a grist mill in general, two 
field trips were arranged. In February two sites in Rhode 
Island were visited: one a large, new, privately owned mill 
with a huge iron waterwheel; the other a small, originally 
water-powered, commercial Kenyon Mill. Although we gained much 
technical information, neither mill was up and running. Of 
greater interest was the April visit to the 1640 Stockbridge 
Mill in Scituate, MA. This mill, although earlier than the 
Kingsbury Mill, is similar in size, shape and construction. It 
is, and always has been, powered by a water-driven iron 
tubwheel. A considerable amount of time was spent in going 
over all aspects of this facility but, again, unfortunately it 
was not actually grinding. We were met by Mrs. Laidlaw, 
President of the Scituate Historical Society (owner of the 
mill) , who gave generously of her time and knowledge, not only 
on the mill but other properties owned by their society, 
including the site of the original "Old Oaken Bucket". 

In February, after proper licensing by the Conservation 
Commission, some work was done on brush clearing along Spring 
Street to make the pond more visible. In the Spring the new 
headrace east wall about 15 feet high, almost finished last 
Fall, was completed. Four upright poles were installed as 
corner supports for the water impoundment box. The two outer 
poles also brace the new bulkhead. The oft-mentioned leak 
continues to run into the headrace. Excavation was continued 
in the headrace down to a layer of old wood braces and iron 
bolts (most likely the remains of an earlier water impoundment 
box) . This appears to be the level of the floor of the last 
wood box. Another section of metal corrugated pipe was cut 
off, and concrete poured around the end of the pipe. Four 
sections of telephone pole were laid crosswise on the bottom 
of the headrace as a base for the box. Finally, the orange 
fence came down, the hole was back-filled by hand, a large 
stone slab bench set in place, and a temporary deck built over 
the headrace. 

The pile of gravel which had been frozen under the mill 
all winter was shoveled out to the area of the loading dock. 
An 8-inch iron pipe was installed to support the large beam, 
replacing the unstable stone pier removed in 1992. The second 
turbine base timber in the original location was uprooted in 
preparation for reinstallation of the to-be-rebuilt turbine. 

The leak from the rear of the dam was directed into an 
8-inch underground pipe emptying into the tailrace. This dried 

69 



out the area which had been turned into a mudhole by the 
constant leak. The pipe was installed below grade and has been 
covered. While digging along the east tailrace wall a snapping 
turtle nest was discovered. It was left in place and the eggs 
later hatched. In regard to wildlife, somehow a kingfisher had 
gotten inside the mill and was discovered almost exhausted 
from banging windows trying to escape. It was captured and 
taken to the edge of the pond, where it immediately floundered 
into the water and floated off. 

The area behind the mill was cleaned up - old pipe 
sections were moved to the bottom of the ramp for easier final 
removal, the large pile of sand and gravel originally 
hand-shoveled from under the mill was rough graded over the 
to-be-park area, and four large capstones were placed on the 
west tailrace wall. Four more will go on the east wall. The 
heavy work was contributed by Mr. Armand Janjigian with his 
backhoe, assisted by three committee members. 

There is a possibility that the new brook culvert on 
Spring Street may create problems in running the turbine. The 
height of the new culvert (six inches higher than the old) was 
based on the level of the new sewer line. It appears that 
water is being backed up into the tailrace. Later it was 
found that most of the backup was caused by remaining hay 
bales, which will be removed. 

On September 28 an inspection of the dam and pond was 
conducted by a representative of the Office of Dam Safety, 
Department of Environmental Management, Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. He made several helpful comments during the 
visit, two of which may be of interest. First, there should be 
a 2 -foot drawdown of the water level during the winter to kill 
off weeds and, second, continuing maintenance of the dam is 
imperative. If it goes, so goes the pond and surrounding 
wetlands, and possibly even the mill. 

In November Mr. John Thompson of the Conservation 
Commission generously donated his time and expertise to the 
problem of that annoying leak. A small hole dug by backhoe 
soon uncovered the inflow of water, about 4 feet down near the 
face of the dam by the headrace. Bentonite was quickly dumped 
in and mixed, and to date the repair seems to be holding. 

FINDS; 

The long iron rod with half a pinion gear which had been 
buried under the front wall was extricated, and discovered in 
the tailrace was another section of the previously found 
"ship's" wheel used to turn this rod. Most important, from 
the tailrace came the complete iron gate which was perhaps in 
the old penstock, and operated by this rod and gear. A piece 
of wood which may be part of a "lantern" gear, and a small 
wood pulley also came from the tailrace. 



70 



CONSTRUCTION: 

A lot of heavy two or three-inch oak plank will be needed 
for various projects; box, penstock, turbine floor, etc. The 
cost of such lumber is considerable and some thought was given 
to the do-it-yourself solution. In that regard, a sawmill was 
located in Sherborn, some logs were purchased, hauled there, 
sawed into planks and brought back to the mill. However, for 
this solution to work, free oak logs are needed. Some were 
promised and have since been delivered to Town property by 
Carruth Capital from the development on South Street. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS: 

As requested, the mill was opened specifically for the 
public on Trolley Day in June and Medfield Day in September 
with rather disappointing attendance. 

BUDGET: 

It should be noted that no cash is provided by the Town 
for this project, and none is requested. The operating budget 
is based on private donations and a share in the returnable 
cans and bottles from the transfer station. Fiscal 1993 began 
with $1,256.00 carry-over, adding $1,006.71 from cans, for a 
total of $2,262.71, less expenses of $1,250.00, providing 
$1,012.71 to start fiscal 1994 (July). 

In appreciation, the Committee would like to thank Mr. 
and Mrs. Dennis Murphy for their donation of the large 
capstones and posts, Mr. John Thompson, Mr. Armand Janjigian, 
Mr. Kenneth Feeney and the Medfield Public Works Department 
for their continued assistance, as well as all residents of 
the Town who continue to support our efforts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael Cronin, Chairman 

Michael Sullivan, Treasurer 

Barbara Leighton, Secretary 

Joseph Comeau 

Donald MacDonald 

Paul Nyren 

Richard Ostrander 

Paul Simpson 

Thomas Lingel, Associate Member 



71 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Long Range Planning Committee is a nine-member group 
appointed by the Planning Board. It studies and makes 
recommendations on long-range issues driven by changes in land 
use and population growth. The group makes projections based 
on existing zoning and other regulations and considers how 
changing those regulations might affect the future of the 
town. 

The Long Range Planning Committee used Medfield Day, 
1993, as an opportunity to solicit comments from Medfield 
residents concerning Medfield' s character and land use issues 
in Medfield. Many of the comments related to preserving the 
Town's character in the face of increasing development 
pressures and the perception that key municipal services, such 
as water and schools, are under considerable strain. The 
Committee presented the responses to the Planning Board and 
recommended six goals for the short-term, and methods of 
achieving those goals through changes to the zoning bylaws, or 
subdivision regulations. 

The Committee plans to organize a forum this spring at 
which Town boards could discuss long-term planning issues and 
ways of developing better communication between the boards. 

As part of its effort to update the Master Plan, the 
Committee also plans to distribute a survey to all Town 
residents covering issues of general concern. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gregory A. Beedy 
Margaret H. Gryska 
Timothy P. Sullivan 
Andrea C. Costello 
Burgess P. Standley 
David G. Strimaitis 
Geralyn M. Warren 
Denise Yurkofsky 



72 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Throughout the year, Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
has been representing the interests of communities in the 
region on a number of critical planning issues. In August 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council initiated a public 
information process for review and comment on the Regional 
Transportation Plan, a long-range planning document that lays 
out future transportation investments in the region. Working 
within the Metropolitan Planning Organization structure, along 
with 5 other agencies, MAPC participated in the development of 
the Plan, mandated by the Intermodal Surface Transportation 
Efficiency Act federal legislation. MAPC's involvement in the 
Regional Transportation Plan led to a final draft that was 
more reflective of local needs. 

Other transportation planning initiatives that 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council participated in on behalf 
of its communities include coordinating local review of 
amendments to the Transportation Improvement Program; the 
State Implementation Plan for Air Quality; and the Program for 
Mass Transportation. 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council also participated in 
the federally required reclassification of local roads, hosted 
an informational forum on the State Implementation Plan; 
coordinated and solicited Transportation Demand Management and 
transportation enhancement project development and funding; 
and participated in an electric vehicle pilot program to 
demonstrate the viability of alternative fuel vehicles in 
Massachusetts . 

As the lead agency for the development of the Overall 
Economic Development Program for the region, Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council brought together local officials and the 
region's business community to develop the Overall Economic 
Development Program priorities. In January, the Economic 
Development Administration approved Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council's Overall Economic Development Program qualifying the 
projects contained in it for public works grants from the 
Economic Development Administration. During the year, Overall 
Economic Development Program project funding by the Economic 
Development Administration totaled $1.8 million. 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council's data center 
continued to develop and disseminate information on the 
communities in the region. Last year the center developed a 
1990 census profile of sample data for each community in the 
region; surveyed and compiled an inventory of vacant 
industrial and commercial sites for each community in the 
region; and developed from the 1990 census, journey to work 
data and population and age group forecasts for each 



73 



community. 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council's administrative 
support to the eight subregions continued to provide an 
important coordinating link between the towns and the region. 
In 1993, Metropolitan Area Planning Council made several 
presentations to Medfield and the other towns in the Three 
Rivers Interlocal Council subregion on the Regional 
Transportation Plan. Metropolitan Area Planning Council also 
continued to update Three Rivers Interlocal Council 
communities on the status of the Route 1 South Corridor 
Planning Study which was developed to examine traffic 
congestion along Route 1. Low-cost mitigation measures such as 
signalization to improve traffic flow are expected to result 
from the study. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David C. Soule 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 




The "Blue Goose", 
Civil Defense Rescue Vehicle. 




j 'WHmmm 

Highway Department working on Causeway Street 
during flooding. 



74 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Public Library continues to grow in both 
services offered and patron usage. Circulation reached a 
record high this year with over 116,000 items borrowed. 1993 
was also a year in which the library took a giant leap 
forward in the technology area. The Medfield Public Library 
now has a permanent connection to the Internet, a worldwide 
network of networks, which offers the capability of accessing 
thousands of databases and informational resources as well as 
the ability to communicate with people all over the world 
through e-mail and bulletin boards systems. This new service 
is available thanks to our membership in the Minuteman 
Library Network which heretofore had concentrated on offering 
automated circulation and cataloging services plus an 
electronic public catalog containing the collections of the 
24 member libraries. Our connection to the Internet makes it 
possible to search other library catalogs within the state 
such as the Boston Public Library and also out of state 
catalogs including the New York Public Library and even the 
Library of Congress from a terminal in our library. The 
Internet also makes it possible to follow pending federal 
legislation and to obtain information on-line from 
Cancer-net, a database sponsored by the National Cancer 
Institute, to name just a few of the services available on 
the Internet. The era of the stand-alone library which 
limited Medfield residents to information and materials in 
our library has ended. 

To meet the more common, recurring needs of our residents, it 
still remains necessary to maintain a strong collection 
locally that is readily available on a walk-in basis. To 
this end, we are pleased to report that total funding from 
public and private sources to purchase materials increased in 
1993 by 12% over the previous year. Moreover, a $5,000 
federal grant for collection development was submitted and 
approved this year, with funds to become available in 1994. 

A long range plan for the library, developed by the Library 
Trustees, staff, and interested citizens was formally adopted 
by the Board of Trustees early in the year. The following 
goals for improved library services were established, with 
progress toward achieving these goals briefly described. 

Goal 1: To provide an adequate. up-to-date on-site 
collection of informational resources and to provide 
electronic access to resources beyond the local library . 
Steps to achieve this goal have been highlighted earlier in 
this report. 

Goal 2: To provide an adequate collection of materials in 
the children's department to meet our young user's needs . The 



75 



Friends of the Library provided supplemental funds during 
the year to enhance the children's collection, and a $5,000 
memorial contribution to the library's endowment fund was 
received for the purchase of children's and young adult 
materials. 

Goal 3: To make changes in policies governing the 
circulation of materials which are more attuned to the 
complexity of patron's lives in today's world . To this end, 
the loan period for all books, except the very newest, was 
extended to 3 weeks, and patrons may now telephone in their 
requests to renew, reserve, and order inter-library loan 
materials. 

Goal 4: To provide adequate staffing levels in all 
departments in order to meet our patrons' needs for service . 
The most critically understaffed areas due to budget 
constraints are the children's room and the reference 
department. We are pleased that town meeting approved the 
library budget for 1993, which provided funds to increase 
hours for our children's librarian to 3/4ths of a full-time 
position. In order to serve the burgeoning children's 
population in Medfield additional funding will be sought in 
next year's budget to make this position full-time. Adequate 
funding for staffing the reference department will be 
requested the following year. 

Goal 5: To have the library open an optimum number of hours 
each week in order to provide convenient and timely access to 
the library . Our primary objective is to open the library 
on Sunday afternoons which is a time when many families 
would like to use the facility. 

We had a marvelously busy children's room throughout the 
year. Our new children's librarian, Gate Shier, has 
transformed the room into a fascinating array of special 
interest centers along with a much expanded collection of 
books, videos, books on tape, and educational games and toys. 
Over 180 programs were held during the year, serving a vast 
number of the children in Medfield. Special thanks is given 
to the Friends of the Library for their extensive support of 
children's services and programs. 

During the final months of the year, a great deal of time was 
devoted to working with the architectural firm, Preservation 
Partnership, to develop plans and specifications for the 
installation of an elevator and other building modifications 
necessary to meet the Americans with Disabilities Act. 
Funding will be sought at the 1994 spring town meeting for 
this building project. 

Library patrons, Trustees, and staff extended their good 
wishes to senior library assistant, Marilyn Erickson, upon 
her retirement in July after 20 years of excellent service to 
the community. We welcomed reference librarian, Emilie 
Dacunto, to the staff in August. 

A high degree of community support for the library was 
evidenced throughout the year. Citizens responded in record 
numbers to a town-wide mailing to join the Friends of the 

76 



Library. Businesses continued to offer their support to the 
library with monetary contributions for books and other 
materials, as did many town organizations. The Friends of 
the Library, under the strong leadership of President Kathy 
Simon, provided funding and volunteered their time and effort 
to enhance the library in so many ways. To all of you we say 
a simple but heartfelt thank you. 

Finally, I would like to extend my sincere appreciation to 
the members of the Board of Library Trustees, who have worked 
long and diligently throughout the year on behalf of the 
citizens of Medfield to improve library services to the 
community. Their dedication is of the highest degree. Both 
Michael West and Elizabeth Kozel who served as chairmen 
during 1993 are to be commended for the vision and commitment 
they so ably provided. It has been a pleasure to work with 
such a fine Board of Trustees. 



1993 LIBRARY STATISTICS 

Circulation 116,624 New Acquisitions 5,003 

New Patron Registrations 829 Total Items Owned 38,798 



Respectfully submitted, 

Jane B. Archer 
Library Director 



77 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Trustees of the Memorial Public Library are pleased 
to present their annual report for the year 1993. The 
Trustees wish to acknowledge the excellent performance of the 
library director, Jane Archer, and her staff. The 
professional and friendly manner in which they assist each 
patron of the library is appreciated by all. The Trustees 
extend special gratitude and recognition to Marilyn Erickson 
who retired this year after 20 years of service to the 
Medfield library. 

Many citizens have expressed appreciation this year for 
the increase in the hours of the Children's Librarian 
position. The additional day each week has permitted an 
increase in the number of imaginative children's programs 
that the library may offer. Now, no child is turned away 
because of overenrollment, and there are programs for school 
age children as well as preschoolers. The summer program was 
enriched with the library offering daily children's programs 
on the theme, "Sail on a Sea of Books." Through added 
staffing, the library was able also to provide assistance to 
patrons on the lower level of the library after school hours. 

The Trustees would like to thank The Friends of the 
Library for their continued hearty support. Ongoing services 
to the community from the Friends include: sponsoring and 
funding Toddler Time and adult programs; adding to the video, 
compact disk and book collections; and purchasing museum 
passes for use by patrons. In addition, this year they 
furnished the funds to convert a storage room into a charming 
children's program room. The Trustees would like to express 
special appreciation to the Board of the Friends for 
dedicating their time and talents to enhance the Medfield 
library. The town of Medfield is indeed fortunate to have 
such a supportive Friends organization. 

The Trustees are grateful for a bequest of $5,000 this 
year to the library's endowment fund, "The Library Trust Fund 
of Medfield," from Caroline Lucy Newell, a longtime Medfield 
resident. This bequest, along with other funds, will be used 
to enhance the library's collection, benefiting all of our 
citizens. 

The Minuteman system continued to broaden the 
availability of information available in Medfield in 1993, 
including access to over 1,100 periodicals. In addition, the 
Minuteman Network now provides a book collection of over 
750,000 separate titles that may be borrowed by any Medfield 
cardholder. Our Minuteman affiliation also provides access 
directly from the Medfield library to databases and other 
library networks within Massachusetts through the Internet. 



78 



A study to formulate a long range plan for the library 
was completed in 1993. A statistically significant survey of 
300 randomly selected households was made to determine what 
are the community's views, needs and expectations for the 
library. Ninety-four percent of those who were surveyed who 
are regular users of the library and ninety-seven percent of 
the respondents who seldom or never use the library expressed 
their feelings that a strong public library is important for 
a community. Goals, objectives and action plans for the 
library in a world of expanding information were developed 
and will be used as a guide by the Trustees. 

Much of the attention of the Trustees in 1993 was 
directed toward the challenge of developing plans to bring 
the library into compliance with the "Americans With 
Disabilities Act." To meet the requirements of the Act, an 
elevator must be added and other changes made to the library. 
The Trustees have worked diligently with the architect to 
insure that the design alterations are both cost effective 
and aesthetically pleasing. 

Although intended to meet the needs of the physically 
challenged, the alterations planned for the library building 
will benefit all patrons through a safer and a more efficient 
arrangement of the building's interior. 

Michael West chose not to run for reelection in 1993; 
his dedication and many contributions to the library as a 
Trustee were much appreciated. Willis Peligian was elected 
Trustee in the spring elections. His hard work and expertise 
have made a notable contribution to the Board's 
effectiveness . 

Finally, the Trustees would like to thank the Medfield 
community and its elected and appointed officials for 
supporting their public library. As we move into the 
Information Age, the goal of the Library Trustees is to keep 
the services provided by the library abreast with the needs 
of the community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elizabeth Kozel, Chairman 
James Baughman, Vice Chairman 
David Allan, Bill Signer 
Maura McNicholas, Secretary 
Richard Fitzpatrick 
Willis Peligian 



79 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 



May 31, 1993 

Given by Colonel Jeanne Hamilton 

Pentagon 

Washington, D.C. 

Ladies and Gentlemen it is a great pleasure to speak to 
you this Memorial Day in Medfield, the town where I grew up. 
As a member of the Armed Forces, I feel a special significance 
in sharing my thoughts with you as we pause to remember those 
brave Americans who gave their lives in Service to their 
country. Our freedom has been secured by their supreme 
sacrifice. I can assure you that the men and women in uniform 
today understand the special role they have in protecting the 
liberties those who died fought to preserve. Today's soldiers 
stand in the first line of America's defense in promoting the 
peace and stability necessary to allow that freedom to endure, 
or to perhaps die in protecting it. 

There is no question that the world has changed. The 
Berlin Wall has fallen and the Cold War is past. The 
international conditions of conflict that existed during World 
War I, World War II, Korea, and Vietnam already seem a distant 
memory. America could be lulled into believing that its 
soldiers will not die on distant battlefields as before. But 
nothing could be farther from the truth. The global situation 
is one of new, ill-defined threats and environmental 
realities. The secretary of Defense recently cited four 
dangers which could lead to military confrontation: A 
continued weak U.S. economy, the failures of some democratic 
reform programs, continued nuclear proliferation, and growth 
in radicalism. 

The military is changing to meet those challenges by 
reshaping and downsizing to a strategic force capable of power 
projection worldwide. The Army Chief of Staff, General Gordon 
Sullivan, recently testified before the House Armed Services 
Committee that the challenge is to transform the military 
while keeping it trained and ready to defend the American 
people. He stated that one of his prime objectives is to "Save 
the Lives of American Soldiers in Future Operations". 

As we remember those who left this world in battle, let 
us also remember those whose fates remain unknown. Over 8,000 
service members are unaccounted for in Korea, and over 2200 in 
Vietnam. There is now evidence that during past wars American 
prisoners may have been taken to the territory of the former 
Soviet Union. Whether they could have survived is a matter of 
question. Their families carry the additional heartache of not 
knowing what happened to their loved ones. 



80 



So as we think today about those whose memories are 
forever inscribed on our Plaques, Memorials, and Monuments, 
and in our hearts and minds, let us always remember the trust 
they put in this country and pray that the greatest lesson 
those lost in war may teach us, is the need to preserve the 
peace. 




Memorial Day guest speakers Colonel Jeanne Hamilton 
and student Lily Wang. 



81 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit 
its fifth Annual Report. The Committee proposed and saw the 
passage of Article 29 at the Annual Town Meeting which voted 
to name the intersection of West Mill Street and Harding 
Street as "Richard C. Werner Square". The square is named in 
honor and memory of Richard C. Werner, who gave his life while 
serving his country during World War II and who remains 
missing in action after his plane was shot down off the coast 
of Italy during a bombing mission. The square is located 
across the street from his boyhood home and the committee is 
working with the Highway Department to improve the 
intersection so that it will be a fitting memorial to Richard 
Werner. A Memorial Day-1994 dedication is being planned. 

The Committee proposed naming the two new streets 
planned off Hawthorne Lane (off Pine Street) and the street 
proposed in the former Williams property off High Street after 
selected Medfield veterans who were killed while serving their 
country during World War I. Our suggestions were rejected by 
the Planning Board who went along with names proposed by the 
developer. The Committee met with the Planning Board to voice 
concern over the street naming process. Our Committee 
received assurance of support from the Planning Board and a 
pledge to keep our committee notified of any and all future 
street development. 

We wish to thank the Medfield Highway Department for 
their continued support as well as Michael Sullivan, the 
Selectmen, the Planning Board, and the many residents and Town 
Boards and Commissions who helped our committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard P. DeSorgher 
Paul F. Curran 
Robert A. Kinsman 
David F. Temple 
Patricia I. Walsh 



82 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Operational Project Program integrates all proven 
technologies into a system of mosquito control that is 
rational, safe, effective, and economically feasible. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch to sustain larval 
growth . 

SOURCE REDUCTION WORK: 

Our primary efforts are concentrated on the drainage of 
shallow, standing, stagnant water, and the maintenance of 
existing flow systems which contribute to mosquito breeding 
sources . 

Drainage Ditches Cleaned 1,950 feet 

LARVICIDING: 

Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development 
is the next most effective control effort. 

Larvicide by backpack\briquets\mistblowers 32 acres 

ADULTICIDING: 

The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes 
necessary when they are numerous, annoying, or threatening to 
residents. 

Adult icide U.L.V. from trucks 1,370 acres 

Surveys, inspections , and monitoring in support of our 
program include locating and mapping breeding areas, larval 
and adult collections, and field work evaluations leading to 
better drainage. 

The Project received 85 calls from residents for 
information and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John J. Smith, Superintendent 



83 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Park and Recreation Commission is a fiv 
member, elected board of volunteers. The Commission is charged 
with the oversight and administration of six Town properties. 
The properties are Baker's (Meeting House) Pond, Baxter Park, 
Hinkley Swim Pond, Metacomet Park, Pfaff Community Center, and 
the 56 Acres property located on Hospital Road. Th 
Commission meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of each 
month at the Pfaff Center. The administration and oversight 
responsibilities of the Commission include, but are not 
limited to, setting policies and fees, initiation and 
administration of programs, park and field facility 
maintenance, building maintenance, short term planning, long; 
term planning, and staffing. 

The Park and Recreation Commission continues to work 
towards it goal to create a park department that is capable of 
administrating the Commission's policies and programs on a day 
to day basis. It is the goal of the Commission to create a 
permanent management system that is attentive to the 
Commission's policy decisions, as well as responsive and 
accessible to the community. We began to realize our goal ini 
1992 by hiring our first part-time administrator, Wayne 
Currie. Wayne resigned his position in June of 1993. His 
position was filled by our current administrator, Sandi Keys. 
In 1993, the administrator's hours were increased from 19 to 
25 hours. The administrator's responsibilities include, but 
are not limited to, carrying out the commission's 
administrative duties, oversight of staff, developing 
programs, running special events, as well as compilation of 
activity class program brochures. 

The activity class program is coordinated by Elsie 
Pocock. The program has expanded from three class sessions per 
year, to four class sessions per year, with the addition of] 
our summer program. The class coordinator's responsibilities 
include, but are not limited to, coordination of classes, 
class development and evaluation, and compilation of classes 
for our brochures. The activity class program is in its eighth 
year and continues to be well attended. 

The Baker's Pond facility, which includes the pond and 
the park adjacent to the pond, continues to need repair. As of 
this writing, the dredging of the pond is yet to be completed. 
The plans to dredge the pond in 1993 were suspended when it 
was discovered that money budgeted for the project would be 
insufficient to cover the cost of both a consultant plan for 
environmental quality, and the actual dredging of the pond. 
The Commission plans to have the operation completed this 
summer. In addition to the pond, the Commission is also 
working to improve the park facility and grounds on the 
property . 

84 



The flagpole at Baxter Park, located at the corner of 
Main and Spring Streets, received a new coat of paint last 
year. The Commission has investigated the installation of a 
brick walkway, installation of benches, and general long term 
improvements to the landscaping of the facility. At this time 
the Commission does not have sufficient funds in the budget to 
dedicate to the park's needs. 

Hinkley Swim Pond, located on Green Street, continues to 
provide summertime recreation for the residents of Medfield. 
The swim pond enjoyed another summer of excellent water 
quality. In addition, the Medfield Swim Team completed another 
successful season. The Commission is exploring ways to improve 
the facility so it may become a more diverse family recreation 
area. The pond was administered in 1993 by Delabarre Sullivan. 
As of this writing an administrator for the 1994 season has 
not yet been contracted. 

Metacomet Park, located on Pleasant Street, consists of 
the Little League field, the soccer field, the playground, and 
the tennis courts. The Commission has made and continues to 
make improvements to the facility. The tennis courts received 
a new surface last spring. The tennis programs and a new badge 
policy have kept the courts busy from early spring until late 
fall. The playground was improved in 1993 with the 
installation of three additional pieces of equipment. The 
soccer field has been undergoing repairs to the underground 
watering systems. However, more improvements to the system and 
the turf are necessary. The Little League field is undergoing 
improvements to its watering system that should be in place 
this year. The Commission has worked with both Little League 
and Medfield Soccer to fund and maintain their respective 
fields. 

The Pfaff Community Center, located on the corner of 
North and Dale Streets, had major repairs completed to its 
roof last year. In addition, new exterior doors were installed 
this past January. The Commission installed a new fee policy 
for users of the building in September of 1993 to help offset 
the costs incurred due to the increased usage of the building. 
The Commission will continue to work to improve the facility, 
as well as work to make the Pfaff Center a more vital 
community meeting place. 

The 56 Acres facility is currently home to two softball 
fields. The Commission continues to work to improve the 
facility with the goal of restoring access to water in order 
to retain and maintain the infield clay through the dry summer 
months. The Commission is currently working with local sports 
organizations to plan development strategy for the facility. 

Creative Camp is the Summer program that offers a variety 
of fun, educational, and developmental activities for small 
children. The 1993 season was a great success, thanks to the 
direction of Jody Bowers and Jean Kingsbury, who plan to 
return for the 1994 season. 



85 



The Commission had one resignation in 1993. W. Jack 
Heller resigned for medical reasons. The seat was filled b\ 
Eric O'Brien until Town elections in March 1994, when the seat 
is up for election. 



It is our Commission's belief that Park and Recreatio 
Commission is a vital resource for Medfield. Our efforts tc 
install a permanent management system is in answer to the 
reality of the times we live in. We cannot function 
effectively as a Commission with volunteers alone. To this 
end, we continue to work toward a full-time Park and. 
Recreation Administrator position. In closing, we would like! 



to thank all our volunteers for their tireless 
thank you for your continued support. 



efforts and 



Respectfully submitted, 

Geralyn Warren, Chairman 
Nina French, Treasurer 
David Armstrong, Secretary 
Robert Miller, Commissioner 
Eric O'Brien, Commissioner 




Babysitting at the Pfaff Center 



86 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1993 the Planning Board approved three definitive 
subdivision plans. The Bridlemere Subdivision is a six-lot 
subdivision that extends Haven Road. Kettle Pond Estates is a 
twelve-lot subdivision off Plain Street with two new streets. 
The third is a twenty-nine lot Open Space Residential 
Subdivision (cluster) , Hawthorne Village, off Pine Street 
which shows three new streets and includes a gift of 40 acres 
of open land to the Town. 

A total of thirty seven lots were released for building 
from the Bridlemere Subdivision, Kettle Pond Estates 
Subdivision and two previously approved subdivisions, 
Woodcliff Estates Phase II and Grist Mill Pond Estates 
Subdivisions. 

The Board endorsed eight "approval-not-required" plans, 
creating 25 new lots along existing streets. 

No site plans were submitted to the Board. 

TOWN MEETING ACTIONS 

The Board placed eight (8) articles on the Town Meeting 
Warrant. It withdrew one article and the other seven were 
passed at Town Meeting and approved by the Attorney General: 

— requiring the % NonWetlands/ Flood Plain land to be 

contiguous 
— clarifying that the Open Space Residential Zoning and 

Aquifer Protection Zoning Districts are subject to the 

requirements of their respective sections of the Zoning 

Bylaw 
— requiring a copy of the plans, as well as the Environmental 

Impact Statement, for Open Space Residential Zoning be 

also filed with the Superintendent of Public Works 
— specifying frontage and perfect square requirements for the 

Open Space Residential Zoning District 
— changing "two acre" requirements of the Aquifer Protection 

District to "80,000 square feet" 
— setting a standard of design for Exit and Entrance signs as 

set out in the "US Department of Transportation Manual 

on Uniform Traffic Control Devices" 
— setting a fine of $300 for each offense of the Scenic Roads 

Act (Article IV, Section 33 of the Town Bylaw) 

The Town Meeting voted to accept Village Way, Thomas 
Clewes Road, John Crowder Road and Joseph Pace Road. 



87 



PLANNING BOARD APPOINTMENTS 

The Board made the following appointments to the Lon 
Range Planning Committee: 

Gregory A. Beedy, Margaret H. Gryska, Timothy P. Sullivan 

terms to expire June 28, 1994 
Andrea C. Costello, Burgess P. Standley, David G. Strimaitiet 

terms to expire June 28, 1995 
Reappointed were Geralyn M. Warren and Denise Yurkofsky, term 

to expire June 28, 1996 

LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

The Board continued to provide consulting assistance t 
the Long Range Planning Committee in their mission to carr 
out a new planning process focusing on the long range use o 
underdeveloped land in the Town, 

We thank the Long Range Planning Committee for theit 
dedication and hard work and encourage them to continue 
their pursuit of good planning guidelines for the Town. 

SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

During 1992 the Sign Advisory Board continued to revie. 
applications for sign permits, to advise and assist sig 
applicants, and to recommend modifications of the Sign Bylaw, 

OTHER BUSINESS 

The Board continues to review the Subdivision Rules an< 
Regulations, with an eye toward improving development 
requirements in the Town. 

Board members served on the Medf ield State Hospital Reus< 
Committee, Open Space Planning Committee, and Capital Budgel 
Committee . 

The Board continued to use the engineering services oi 
Whitman & Howard for subdivision review and street' 
construction inspections. 

The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the 
cooperation and assistance of the Town Boards and Departments, 
with special thanks to Town Counsel Peter Michelson, 
Superintendent of Public Works Kenneth P. Feeney, and Trees 
Warden, Edward Hinkley. 



88 



Planning Board meetings are held weekly on Mondays at 
!8:00 PM at the Town House and are open to the public. 
[Appointments with the Board must be made by the Thursday noon 
prior to the meeting. Request for information or appointments 
should be directed to the Planning Board Administrator, Norma 
Matczak, at the Town House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John K. Gagliani, Chairman 
Mark G. Cerel, Vice-chairman 
Paul B. Rhuda, Secretary 
Margaret E. Bancroft 
David E. Sharff 



89 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Recycling Committee is appointed by the< 
Board of Selectmen to implement recycling in Medfield. During 
1993, the committee members and volunteers worked at thei 
Transfer Station educating residents, worked with the town 
Department of Public Works and the schools and participated in 
all aspects of recycling including the Millis Consortium. 

Cost Avoidance 

Based on information provided by the Department of Public 
Works, Medfield residents recycled 1,165.19 tons of 
recyclables in 1993, a 13 percent increase over the 1992 
collection. 





Percent 


(Cost) or 




Tons 


Change 


Revenue 




Commodity Recycled 


From 1992 


Generated* 


Cost Saved* 


Newspaper 713.77 


+14 


(5348.00) 


53,532.75 


Glass 104.14 


-6 


961.60 


7,810.50 


White Metal 310.0 


+19 


1550.00 


-0- 


Cans 21.9 


+12 


-0- 


-0- 


#2 Plastics 14.7 


+46 


(450.00) 


1,102.50 


Deposit 








Containers 0.52 


-28 


1459.25 


-0- 


Total 1,165.19 


+13 


(1,827.75) 


62,445.75 



* Costs represent trucking to market. Revenues are the 
net amount of what was paid for the commodity minus the 
trucking costs. 

** Cost saved is the amount it would have cost to truck 
and tip these commodities at the Millbury incinerator at an 
approximate truck and tip fee of $75 per ton. 

Public Education 

1. Medfield Recycling Guide . The guide was sent to all 
Medfield households and copies were given to the Medfield 
Welcome Wagon. The guide explains what to recycle and gives 
helpful hints to make recycling easier. The total cost of this 
mailing was $750. 

2. Outreach to the Schools . Cafeterias - The committee 
surveyed all of the schools to determine what their recycling 
practices were for their cafeteria and paper wastes. 
Additionally, the Committee investigated the use of washable 
and reusable Lexan plastic milk containers to replace paper 
milk containers, but it was determined that the collection 



90 



infrastructure is not in place and that the conversion costs 

SS* Schoo? h - 9 Ninth grade students from the environmental 
studies, community service work program assisted Committee 
Members with recycling at the transfer station as well as with 

Preschool -"^recycling curriculum is being implemented by the 

teachers at the Integrated Preschool program. 

Wheelock Schools - A California schools curriculum has been 

given to a teacher at the school and it is being reviewed for 

inclusion in the Grades 1-3 curriculum. 

Dale Street and Middle Schools - The Committee has been 

working with these schools to expand their recycling programs. 

3. Press Releases - Press releases on plastics, 9iass, 
volunteers, the paint swap, and the recycling bulletin board 
were written by the Committee and published in the Medfield 
Suburban Press, and the Middlesex News. 

4 Medfield Day - The Recycling Committee sponsored a 
booth 'at Medfield Day. The booth featured Do and Don'ts for 
plastics recycling, the amount that Medfield saves because of 
recycling, the Medfield Recycling Guide, a listing of places 
to take reusable items and items that Medfield does not 
recycle, and a raffle for recycling bins, recycled paper 
stationary and reusable lunch sacks. 

Paint Swap 

The paint swap was held on June 5, 1993, the same day as 
the three-town household hazardous waste day. Twenty-one 
people delivered 146 cans of paint and all but 40 cans were 
picked up by residents who used them to paint outdoor 
furniture, sheds, models, interior walls, etc., or given to 
nonprofit organizations including the High School Drama Club, 
the Odyssey House and the Massachusetts Audubon Stony Brook 
facility. The remaining 40 cans were returned to the residents 
who dropped them off. 

Battery Reeve ling 

The Recycling Committee continues to recycle button cell 
batteries (the kinds found in small appliances such as cameras 
and hearing aids) at CVS, RiteAid, Lord's and the Library. 

New at the Transfer Station 

1 Other Recyclables Bulletin Board - An enclosed 
bulletin board has been built and affixed to the cement 
retaining wall in the recycling area at the transfer station. 
The Recycling Committee uses this board to list where 
commodities that are not recycled at the Medfield transfer 
station can be recycled or reused. 

2. Covers for the Plastics Bins - In 1993 the transfer 
station was littered with #2 plastic bottles as they were 
blowing out of the collection bins. Mesh covers have been 
purchased to cover the bins when they are not in use to reduce 

91 



the number of bottles that blow away. 

3 . Meeting Notes to the Volunteers - The Medf iel 
Recycling Committee now sends all of its volunteers copies o 
the meeting minutes to keep them up-to-date with the man 
changes in recycling at the transfer station. 

Regional Recycling 

The town continued to participate in the twenty-tow^ 
Millis Consortium and participated in the procurement 
committee that reviewed nine responses to the Consortium' ( 
request for proposals (RFP) to provide recycling services t 
the twenty towns. The consortium chose Prins Recycling o 
Charlestown as the recycling vendor. Medfield has determined* 11 
based on cost of transportation to the Charlestown site, tha 1* 
it will not participate in the Consortium marketing with Prin ° 
at this time. E 

f 

Plans for the Future 



1. Swap Area - The Committee will be setting up a swajl^ 
area where small furniture items, electronics, garde)! 
equipment, etc. that are still in usable condition, but an; 
being discarded by the present owner, can be dropped off. 

2. Telephone Books - The Committee is working with NYNE 
to determine if we can recycle telephone books at the time th<j 
new books are distributed in March. 

3. Household Battery Recycling - The Committee ii 
investigating the possibility of collecting household alkaline 
and nickel-cadmium batteries for recycling. 

4. Paper - The Committee will continue to investigati 
whether other types of paper including paperboard (cerea! 
boxes) , cardboard, and book bindings can be recycled ii 
Medfield. 

5. Middle Street School - The Recycling Committee plans 
to make a presentation on recycling at the Middle Streel 
School in March. 

State Approval 

This year the Medfield recycling and composting programs 
were approved by the State Massachusetts Department oi 
Environmental Protection. 

The Recycling Committee would like to thank all of the 
residents for their participation in and support of recyclinc 
in Medfield. We are pleased to report the growth in recyclinc 
in Medfield and welcome input and inquiries. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cynthia Greene, Chairperson 

Kenneth P. Feeney, Town Representative 

Andrea Costello 

Cheryl Dunlea 

Sandy Frigon 

Tim Holt 

92 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 
TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In July 1993 the School Committee reorganized and elected 
the following officers: Janice Young (Walpole) Chairman, 
Victor Knustgraichen (Wrentham) Vice-chairman, and Karl Lord 
(Medfield) Secretary. 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled 
(meetings on the third Wednesday of each month at 7:30 P.M. in 
Uthe Committee Meeting Room at the school. From the beginning 
|jof November until the end of January, the Budget Sub-Committee 
Ueets as necessary for the purpose of developing the budget 
if or the following year. Other subcommittee meetings are 
scheduled as needed. 

j GRADUATION 

On June 4, 1993, 168 students were graduated in an 
I impressive afternoon ceremony. William Vellante, Chairman of 
the Tri-County School Committee, delivered the welcoming 
[address to more than one thousand guests. Music was provided 
I by the Mi 11 is High School Band. 

Mary Fleming, Director of Pupil Personnel Services, 
presented scholarships and awards totaling more than $95,000 
to deserving seniors. Medfield students receiving awards were 
Brian White and Christopher Jones. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

In September 1993, Tri-County welcomed approximately 750 
students to the new school year. Of that number, 23 were 
Medfield residents. 

Because of the Cooperative Employment Program at 
Tri-County, thirty-two students started early employment in 
industry. At graduation, 50% of the students were working in 
their technical areas. Approximately 34% of the class planned 
to attend 2 or 4 year postgraduate schools. Eleven percent of 
the class planned to enter the military. Among the colleges, 
graduates have enrolled in are: Emmanuel College, Bryant 
College, University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, 
Massachusetts College of Art, Wentworth Institute, Johnson & 
Wales University, and Northeastern University. 

In October, Tri-County administered the PSAT's for the 
College Board. Additional testing and career inventories were 
administered for all Grade 9 students by the Guidance 
Department. Tri-County counselors, parents, and students 
joined other area towns for a Higher Education Night in 
Medfield. 



93 



The Pupil Personnel Department developed evening programs) 
for 92-93 centered around the theme of "Adjusting to School" . 
The Guidance Department continued its Peer Helpers program to 
assist with school adjustment and to introduce the TECHNICAL 
SCHOOL to junior high students in the community. The 
department continued its programs on preparing for college 
with the assistance of Dean Junior College Financial Aidjl 
Administrators and Admissions Counselors. Tri-County hosted! 
two Career Days for Grade 8 students and held evening Oper 
Houses for parents. 

Tri-County joined with five other area high schools 
(Framingham, Newton, Assabet, Minuteman, Keefe Tech) tci 
establish METRO WEST TECH PREP. This concept has been referred 
to by National Business and Educational Leaders as one of the 
most exciting initiatives in education. The primary function 
of the Tech Prep program will be the combined secondary /post 
secondary program that is being offered to Tri-County students 
with Massachusetts Bay Community College, Wentworth Institute 
of Technology, Northeastern University, Dean Junior College,; 
Johnson & Wales and additional institutions. Students involved; 
in the Tech Prep Program must complete an established level oft 
academic and technical competencies. Students upon completion 1 
of their high school work will be awarded credits according to 
the articulated agreement. 

Currently, nine students are involved in a pre-engineeredi 
program. They attend college classes on Saturdays; classes arei 
taught by college professors from Wentworth, Northeastern, and' 
Mass Bay Community College. Student enrolled in this Tech 
Prep pre-engineered program will complete four college level 
courses with college credit given by any of the above 
institutions. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

During the 1992-93 school year there were several changes 
made in the academic offerings at Tri-County. All Grade 11 and: 
12 students now have two periods of math during their academic 
cycle. The school recognizes that its graduates are going to; 
work in an increasingly technological workplace and mastery of 
basic skills is a minimum requirement for success on the job, 
Advancements and promotions will be earned by those who can 
use and apply more advanced reasoning, communication, and 1 
computation abilities. 

A new course was implemented this year for all Grade 9s 
students. Fundamentals of Technology teaches aspects of 
personal and shop safety as well as trade specific information 
regarding the use of hand and power tools, fasteners, and 
other pertinent information. 

There has been an increased emphasis placed upon the: 
academic program at Tri-County as it has become clear that the- 
academic requirements of an increasingly technological 
workplace demand it. 



94 



: :areer/technical programs 

Wherever possible the career and technical programs have 
ifcnade every effort to simulate real work experience by 
icfproviding service to district town agencies, civic 
firganizations and residents. 

The Auto Body and Auto Repair Programs have upgraded 
their curricular and equipment in an effort to stay abreast of 
technological advances in the automotive industry. The 
automotive department has acquired a new information access 
ystem consisting of a 486 computer with super VGA graphics 
and a CD/ROM system. All technical information will be on 
compact discs and can be accessed by students in 20 seconds. 
The new CD system will replace the bulky and awkward paper 
manuals presently in use. This method is now in use in many 
automotive dealerships. The auto repair program will renew its 
ASE Master Certification from the National Automotive 
Technician Education Foundation, Inc. (NATEF) for '93-94 
school year. This certification is nationally recognized and 
considered to be the highest achievement known in the 
automotive industry. 

CAD/ CAM, Computer-Aided Drafting/Machining, has been 
added to the Machine Shop curriculum. With this new equipment 
students have the opportunity to learn CNC machinery 
programming and automated machining. A classroom has been 
setup with individual computers and "Master CAM" software 
connected to a CNC Automated Milling Machine. The students use 
this system to write programs that control Automated 
Machining. 

The Child Care Laboratory Nursery School continues to 
attract large numbers of toddlers and preschoolers from our 
district towns. The Franklin Fire Department has helped the 
children in the program observe National Fire Prevention Week 
in October. The teachers and students are looking forward to 
community involvement as the school year proceeds. All members 
of the Tri-County District are encouraged to drop by to view 
the High School Training Program in action. 

The Commercial Art Program has expanded its Desktop 
Publishing facilities with the purchase of additional 
hardware/ software. There are now 16 Macintosh work stations 
with the latest software for Graphic Design and Computer 
Graphics. This program is now also offered to students from 
the Graphic Arts Program. 

The Cosmetology Program is in its second year of 
expansion. The new salon built last year provides for an 
additional 25 students to enter the program. The program 
provides students with 1000 hours of instruction to prepare 
them for the state license in hairdressing. Facial and 
manicures along with hair care continue to make this a popular 
program for area residents. The clinic is open to members of 
the community during the school year. 



95 



Culinary Arts has added a state of the art rack rotar 
oven that will allow students to produce a large volume o 
bake goods. The oven uses a steam injection process tha 
creates a hard crust on special breads. Gerry's Place has 
new coat of paint and new chairs are on order. Gerry's Place 
the student operated restaurant and bake shop, is open to th 
public during the school year. 

Electronic Technology has added consumer product servici 
to their curriculum which will provide additional jobs fo:J 
students in the electronic field. New electronics trainees ar « 
now assisting in the instruction of DC, AC, Semiconductor an« t 
Microprocessor Technology. 

Graphic Arts has provided their printing service to Towr 
Halls, Police and Fire Departments, as well as many nonprofit 
organizations throughout the Tri-County District. 

Students receive realistic career training in banking bji 
working at the Dean Cooperative Bank located at Tri -County, lj! 
The branch bank is open to the public during the school yeai 
for all banking services. Along with marketing and bankinc 
instruction, students in this program are mastering skills ir 
computerized accounting, work processing and Lotus 1-2-3. 

Medical Careers continues to attract many students ir 
this State Certified Nursing Assistant program. The course? 
provides students with skills to work in a variety of medical 
settings. The course combines both classroom instruction and 
on-site clinical experience in many of our district area 
nursing homes. 

The Welding curriculum now includes training in stainlessi 
steel and aluminum welding of pipe. Students with this, 
knowledge according to the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers (ASME) Code will be able to find employment in the 
Nuclear Power industry. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Continuing Education Program has enrolled 725' 
students for the 1992-93 school year. Gourmet Cooking, Low Fat' 
Cooking, Electronics II, Introduction to Computers, 
Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting (CAD - Release 12) and* 
Introduction to Computer Aided Machining (CAM) are new 
offerings this year which compliment the other twenty 
vocational/ technical programs that are offered in the evening! 
to area residents. 

The Continuing Education Division has expanded the 
Cosmetology Program by offering the opportunity for residents 
to attend during the school day. The program which has a 
separate salon is entering its second successful year. 

ATHLETICS 

The 1992-93 athletic teams produced the most successful 
programs in the history of the school. Three championship 

96 



Ibanners were added to the gymnasium wall as participation 
(continued to grow. 

The Fall saw the first banner produced by the Girls 
Ivolleyball Team with an impressive 9 and 1 interdivisional 
[(record. Cross Country and Football both finished with a 500 
^record. A young soccer team finished with its largest group of 
(underclassmen participating. 

The Winter season produced two more banners in Girls 
Basketball and Wrestling. The Wrestling team won the newly 
formed Mayflower Wrestling League Championship while the Girls 
(Basketball team produced its first-ever banner. The Boys 
Basketball team finished with an impressive 16 and 4 record. 
The Cheerleaders team continued to show their spirit for the 
IWinter team. 

The Spring teams continued with high athletic 
(participation. Both the Baseball and Track Field teams had 
very competitive seasons with many underclassmen returning. 
The Girls Softball team finished with a 12 and 8 record and a 
istrong showing in the State Tournament against Westport. 

j SUMMARY 

As we move into 1994 and continue to provide for the 
ieducational needs of our students, we wish to thank the 
(District residents for their support and cooperation. We 
(intend to maintain in the future the high educational 
standards that have earned Tri-County that support in the 
past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Janice Young, Chairperson 
Karl D. Lord, Medfield 



97 



WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Our second year of operations under the Enterprise Fund 
system has gone well, with no need for increases in revenues 
at the present time. Our Sewer System Enterprise Fund will, 
however, most likely require increased revenues in the near 
future. It has, therefore, been a successful year for the 
combined system operations. 

The recent turnaround in the economy has brought on a 
spate of residential construction that has created a situation 
where roads have been temporarily closed or severely 
restricted in traffic flow due to water and sewer 
construction. Construction activities in the areas of Route 
109 East, (Main Street) , South Street, and Pine Street (beyond 
Tamarack Drive) are the most notable examples. Fortunately, 
the worst of it is now over. Coincident with these 
construction projects involving street excavation such as "The 
Meadows", "Wampatuck Estates" (renamed Dela Park Acres), 
"Woodcliff II", "Hawthorne Drive", "Brook Run" and "Southern 
Acres", has been a developing policy with respect to 
non-conventional ways of connecting to the gravity sewer 
system. The State Department of Environmental Protection has 
vacillated between requiring residents in these developments 
to operate their own sewage pumping stations and/or requiring 
the towns to take them over and operate them. Heretofore it 
has been our policy to take a "hands off" attitude toward 
them, requiring that the homeowners in the development provide 
for their operation. It has been necessary in some instances 
to depart from this policy in order to accommodate neighboring 
homeowners and/or developments. In those situations where 
needs other than those of the development itself are supplied 
through the sewage pumping station, the station will be owned 
and operated by the Town. It is to be noted that our Master 
Plan of 1970 included several sewage pumping stations. 

One of these planned pumping stations (at the foot of 
Juniper Lane) has been the focus of an effort by those that 
would be served by this station to activate a plan whereby 
they could be connected to the Town Gravity Sewer System. The 
non-availability of Federal and/or State Grant monies has 
placed a severe financial condition on the feasibility of such 
a project, and because of this, has precipitated the 
appointment by the Selectmen of a Special Committee to examine 
the problem and work toward the best solution possible. It is 
foreseen that situations similar in nature will develop as 
time goes on. 

We are happy to report that we have received the Easement 
from the landowner in Sherborn whose property fell within the 
required 400-ft. radius of our future Well #6. We are now 
pursuing the acquisition of required easements from the 



98 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Environmental 
Management for the remaining involved property. We have felt 
sufficiently comfortable with these negotiations so that we 
have decided to proceed with the Design Phase of this project, 
which was approved unanimously at the Special Town Meeting of 
October 4, 1993 (Article 4). It is anticipated the total 
project cost will be in the neighborhood of $1.6 million 
dollars in all, including the extension of 12" main line along 
North Meadows Road (Route 27) from the Transfer Station to the 
wellhead site near the Charles River. 

Our future water needs beyond activation of Well #6, with 
an activation date scheduled for summer of 1995, will include 
consideration of water treatment needs, since our next most 
likely prospect for expansion would be the reactivation of 
Well #5. As you know, this system cannot be activated without 
a treatment system, due to the presence of water 
discoloration. There are added needs for treatment due to the 
appearance of manganese in the Mine Brook aquifer, chiefly 
from Well #4. 

We must remind the Town again, unfortunately, that until 
Well #6 comes on line, (hopefully to meet the summer peak 
needs of 1995) , we must be diligent in practice of water 
economy and to continue our "odd-even" plan during times of 
water system stress. We would anticipate continued water ban 
restrictions this summer, and possibly in the summer of 1995. 
As a means of putting "teeth" into our water ban restrictions 
we will introduce for Town Meeting action a Bylaw change 
authorizing the Town to levy fines against water ban 
violators. 

During the year we have also begun planning for the 
future of the Water & Sewerage Board membership, bringing on 
board Mr. Neil MacKenzie as an Associate Member, in order to 
provide for orderly change in the composition of the Board. 
Mr. MacKenzie currently wears two hats, maintaining his 
current membership on the Board of Health as well. His 
presence on the Board is most welcome considering the order of 
business currently at hand. 

Lastly, on behalf of the other members of the Board, I 
would like to thank the employees of the Department for their 
continued good efforts to provide water and sewer services to 
the residents of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Leland D. Beverage, Chairman 

John McKeever 

Peyton March 

Neil MacKenzie, Associate 



99 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my Annual Report for the fiscal year of 
1993. 

The following Scales, Weights, Liquid Measuring meters 
and Linear Measures were sealed: 

Balances and Scales 33 

Weights 73 

Liquid Measuring Meters 54 

Linear Measures 8 

Total 168 

A total of 267 inspections were made for 15 
establishments and 163 Devices were sealed for 1993. Revenue 
for the Department was $2,558.40. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patricia A. Rioux 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Veterans' services include helping the veteran with 
benefits when needed, hospitalization, pension assistance, 
information on education, social security and burial 
allowances. 

Services and assistance rendered Medfield Veterans and 
their dependents are authorized by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. The Commonwealth reimburses the Town 
seventy-five percent of the benefits extended. 

This assistance includes fuel, food, clothing, housing 
and medical expenses for Veterans and their families. 

I wish to thank Town officials for their assistance 
during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul Cur ran 
VETERANS' AGENT 

100 



TREE AND INSECT PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 
1993. 

The Town of Medfield purchased a stump remover 
incorporated with nine local towns. 

The gypsy moth are still present in the Northeast and 
West sections of town. Due to the damage from the gypsy moth, 
we need to remove some dead trees. 

The tree department uses a 1976 Ford truck which will 
need to be replaced within the next few years. 

Contract services were provided this year by Tripp Tree. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish 
spraying to be done on their property, prior notice must be 
given to the Town Clerk by registered mail no later than 
March 1. This notice must be given each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. H ink ley 

TREE WARDEN 

DIRECTOR OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 



101 



MEDFIELD YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The 1993-1994 Youth Advisory Commission voted to put 
all their attention on fun-raisers for scholarships, and a 
"Volley Ball Tournament." We received a Drug Free Grant of 
$300 from the state with the help of Karen Costa, Health 
Content Specialist of Medfield Public Schools. They voted to 
put a hold on other projects, such as, The Nursing Home, 
Recycling, and the Marathon House. 

Some of the Y.A.C. students assisted with the activities 
at the Halloween Party sponsored by the Park and Recreation 
Commission on October 30, 1993. 

On March 11, 12, 13, 1993-94, a Drug Free Weekend was 
held with great success. A group of Youth Advisory Commission 
students helped by organizing and running a "Kiddie Corner" 
while parents were participating in the Fitness Expo. The 
children did crafts, watched cartoons, and decorated 
cupcakes. The students of the Youth Advisory Commission did a 
great job. 

The "Volleyball Tournament" will take place, Saturday, 
April 30, 1994 at the Hinkley Swim Pond at 11 A.M. 

The Youth Advisory Commission will run a car wash at the 
Medfield Bay Bank on Saturday, April 9, from 1-4 P.M. 

The Youth Advisory Commission, both past and present, is 
doing a super job and should be commended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary V. Gillis 

ADULT YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION ADVISOR 



1993-94 EXECUTIVE BOARD - GRADE 12 

Marc Mercadante - Chairman 
Sara Mastronardi - Vice Chairman 
Eric Palson - Secretary 
Nicholas Scobbo III - Treasurer 

ADVISORY COMMISSION 
Grade 9 

Mark Carrigan Drew Marticke 

Matthew DeSorgher Jill Steinkeler 

Peter Dunn Kelly Thomson 

Jacquelyn Frazier Noah Weinstein 
Andrew Kepple 



102 



i t: 



Grade 10 

Daniel Arnold 
Thomas Guilmett< 
Jillian Mariani 

Grade 11 



Allison Foley 
Katherine Kearney 
Jennifer LaFrance 

Grade 12 

L. Paul Galante III 
Ellen Gray 
Jennifer Karnakis 

ADULT ADVISORS 

Thomas McNif f 
Ray Burton, Jr. 
Mary V. Gillis 
Elizabeth Newton 
Kimberly O'Connor 
Regina O'Connor 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr, 
Sharon Semeraro 



Sheila McCabe 
Elizabeth McKeever 
Lauren Young 



Tracie Slack 
Anna-Mari Spognardi 



Melissa Kelcourse 
Brendan McNulty 
(Reporter) 



Police Department 

Alternate Officer 

Adult Advisor 

Youth Outreach Worker 

Y.A.C. Member 

St. Edwards Youth Ministry 

Board of Selectmen 

School Committee 



103 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1993 



105 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the Citizens of Medfield: 

I can best describe calendar year 1993 as a year of 
achievement as well as a year of frustration. The 
achievement was probably best manifested when the town, on 
two separate occasions, voted to support an 
addition/renovation project at Medfield High School. This 
vote showed a committed attempt to maintain a central focus 
on the educational needs of the students. 

It was a year of frustration because of the economy and state 
action that continually results in towns like Medfield having 
to raise taxes at a time when it hardly seems appropriate. 
We have experienced educational difficulties and frustration 
and if this trend continues, the quality of education which 
our students deserve and need will be severely impacted. It 
is important to note that our students continue to receive 
the best possible education for the money. This has been 
made possible by the outstanding attitude which the 
administration, staff and faculty have maintained, in spite 
of the potential effect that our budget status could have 
had. I cannot say enough about how fortunate we are in 
Medfield to have the personnel that we do. They are truly 
interested in making the difference for each child. They 
remain undaunted during these difficult times and I remain 
thankful for their contributions. Ultimately, you the 
citizens of Medfield, make it possible for us to do what we 
really do well and we are indebted for that opportunity. 

As we review the past year we note the following areas: 

ENROLLMENT ; The five-year projection is for an overall 
increase of approximately 5% . This increase coincides with 
both state and national trends. It will appear first at the 
elementary school level and subsequently at the secondary 
school level. 

FACILITIES : A two year reorganization study of our 
elementary facilities was made and the School Committee has 
adopted a Prekindergarten to Grade 3 reorganization. This 
reorganization will move Grade 1 from the Ralph Wheelock 
School to the Memorial School starting in September 1994. 

A committee was formed comprised of parents, administrators 
and staff, representing each of the three buildings. Their 
task was to look at the three elementary schools and 
investigate all of the possible options for grade 
configurations to determine what would be the most 
educationally sound and economically feasible recommendation. 



106 



The Reorganization Committee was composed of the following 
members : 

Laury Hunt Wheelock Parent 

Andy Costello Memorial Parent 

Chris Taft Dale St. Parent 

Gail Guilmette Memorial Teacher 

Vivian Westwater Memorial Teacher 

Katherine Belmont Dale St. Teacher 

Holly Nilson Pupil Services Teacher 

Cheryl Dunlea Wheelock Teacher 

Beth Asher Wheelock Parent 

Dr. Bill Tosches School Committee 

Susan Whitten Wheelock Administrator 

Frank Hoffman Dale/Memorial Administrator 

The school population increase and the space problem at the 
Wheelock School necessitated a change for the 1994-95 school 
year. After meeting monthly and discussing many possible 
options, the committee sent a questionnaire to all parents. 
A public forum was also held. The recommendation, therefore, 
was Plan A which is PreK, K and 1 at the Memorial School, 
grades 2 and 3 at Wheelock and grades 4 and 5 at Dale Street. 
This plan will continue for at least the next three years. 
The committee will continue to meet to review enrollment 
figures and determine future alternatives for the elementary 
schools. It should be noted that the Dale Street School will 
soon be feeling the squeeze as the number of sections for 
grades four and five continue to increase. 

The Committee also investigated accommodations for MAP 
(Medf ield After School Program) and Accept Collaborative and 
will be addressed in the move. 

The Reorganization Committee will remain active and continue 
to monitor enrollments and space needs. 

CONTRACT NEGOTIATIONS : Negotiations have been completed with 
administration (those eligible to negotiate) and the 
cafeteria workers. Negotiations with teachers, custodians 
and clerical personnel continue. 

CURRICULUM : This year the School Committee adopted major 
revisions to our health, technology, foreign language and 
applied arts programs. 

This year has been a very active year in our professional 
development activities. 

Our participation in MCET, the satellite television network 
was expanded to include a satellite dish at the high school. 
Despite budget constraints, it is important that we keep pace 
in technology for the benefit of our students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas M. Reis 
Superintendent of Schools 



107 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The period of January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993 was a 
year of transition and challenge in meeting the curriculum 
and instructional needs of our students. 

Congratulations to Mr. John A. Moretti, who moved into the 
position of Superintendent of Schools in North Smithfield, 
Rhode Island. Mr. Moretti provided ten years of service to 
the school department as an assistant high school principal 
and assistant superintendent of schools. During his tenure, 
Mr. Moretti experienced the tightening to the eventual 
expansion of programs meeting increased enrollment and 
student needs. His contributions to the school system are 
appreciated. 

Congratulations to Mr. Austin "Buck" Buchanan, who retired as 
Director of Plant Management for the Medfield School 
Department. Mr. Buchanan had served the school department 
for three years. His tenure as director experienced the 
renewed growth of the school system as it effected the 
utilization of the facilities. His knowledge of plant 
management will be missed as we move forward in dealing with 
the reorganization of facilities. 

Mr. Robert Fitzgerald replaced Mr. Buchanan as Director of 
Plant Management in August 1993. 

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

A major initiative, started in 1992, was the documentation of 
the academic curriculum which included a needs assessment, a 
planning and development component, an implementation stage, 
and a program and student evaluation phase. The project 
managers are commended for the effort in maintaining this 
initiative. 

In addition, the professional staff has investigated the 
instructional implications as they relate to the assessment 
of student performance, inclusion, development ally 
appropriate teaching methods, integration of technology and 
conflict-resolution among young people. The In-Service 
Committee, working with the Curriculum Council, team leaders, 
and grade leaders are commended for their efforts in 
formulating the staff development programs supporting these 
areas . 

Research and development funds and staff development have 
advanced our progress. The curriculum has been strengthened 
in reading, advanced placement mathematics and foreign 
language, writing and the peer editing programs, 
literature-based instruction, integration of career 



108 



directions and thematic approaches to reading, expansion of 
foreign language in the middle level grades, and updating 
health education in grades Prekindergarten, Kindergarten, 
Grade 4 and Grade 6 through Grade 8. Technology is more 
widespread throughout our schools. 

Through a cooperative venture teachers are introducing 

interdisciplinary approaches, team teaching models and 

exploring the humanities approach as a means of teaching 
future courses. 

Curriculum in the Medfield Schools is active and current; 
instruction is changing to meet the needs of all students. 

FINANCIAL SUPPORT 

As a result of initiatives in technology, music, the 
inclusionary model, foreign language exploration in the 
middle level grades and increased enrollment, our major 
budget increase has been in the area of new personnel. 

With the support of the Warrant Committee, the School 
Committee was able to achieve a five percent increase in the 
Fiscal year '94 budget for personnel and operations. Through 
the efforts of a number of professional staff, grants were 
written for various programs supported by state and federal 
funding. A total of $216,194 was received through these 
funding sources. The new educational reform appropriation 
enhanced the educational programs of our schools with the 
receipt of approximately $278,000. 

In July of 1993, the Medfield School Committee established a 
Task Force on Pupil Transportation. This committee was 
charged with looking at the manner in which this service is 
provided and financed. The Task Force recommended that a 
separate and distinct organizational structure be 
established, funded outside of the educational budget. The 
School Committee and other municipal leaders approved the 
concept, and the school administration is working 
cooperatively with the Police Chief in the implementation of 
the concept for the fall of 1994. 

Collectively, the various funding sources have supported the 
initiatives and enabled the system to continue to strengthen. 

A stronger link among levels of our schools is being 
developed. In doing so, the expected high level of 
performance will be consistently maintained. The 
administrators and staff, in leadership positions, are 
working to this end. The school improvement plans, which 
will evolve from the site councils, will direct the movement 
of programs among the grade levels as well as within the 
grade level. The school system continues to move as a whole 
as we strengthen our curriculum and instruction. 



109 



SUMMARY 

As our school system moves into the future, the collaborative 
efforts must continue and expand. Through these efforts, the 
quality of our schools will remain at a high level of 
performance . 

The children are the future. What happens now will influence 
their lives in years to come. 

In my first year as your assistant superintendent of schools, 
I am proud to be a part of a school system which is committed 
to the education of its children. I thank the community of 
Medfield for its continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert J. Berardi, Ed.D. 
Assistant Superintendent 
of Schools 




Blake Middle School students participating 
in Odyssey of the Mind. 



110 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK 
KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully submit 
our Annual Report for the school year ending December 31, 
1993. 

The official enrollment of the high school for the 1992-93 
school year was 457. There were 106 students who graduated 
in the class of 1993. Of those, 95% have gone on to post 
secondary education. 

This year was marked by outstanding achievement on the part 
of many students. Among its graduates, 14% were members of 
the National Honor Society. Elizabeth Sherwood and 
Leighanne Jenkins were Valedictorian and Salutatorian 
respectively. A number of students were honored for academic 
excellence by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. 
Daniel Mccormick was named as a Semif inalist. The Commended 
Students, based on their 1992 PSAT scores, were Valerie 
Dolan, Ellen Gray, Lisa Halliday, Jennifer Karnakis, Jessica 
Riceberg, Steven Schveighoffer and Melissa Woo. 

Over 96% of our graduating seniors took the College Board 
Examinations. Our SAT and Achievement scores were well above 
the state and local averages. We are pleased to announce 
that our verbal mean score was 486 and our mathematics mean 
score was 523. The verbal score was the highest average 
attained since the class of 1974. 

Medfield High School students not only excelled in the 
classroom but also in many areas of extracurricular 
activities. Over seventy-four per cent of the student body 
participated in our interscholastic athletic program. Many 
of our teams made tournament: boys soccer, volleyball, 
field hockey, boys basketball, girls basketball, boys 
tennis, baseball and softball. Also, we had two league 
champions: girls winter track and boys basketball. The 
baseball team won the south sectional championship. 

During the past year the high school administration continued 
to work closely with the Town of Medfield School Planning and 
Building Committee. Construction originally scheduled to 
begin in June was delayed until November. Unanticipated cost 
factors caused the project bids to exceed the previously 
appropriated construction estimate. This situation led the 
School Planning and Building Committee to seek an additional 
sum of $2.9 million through a debt exclusion. This sum of 
money was approved by Medfield' s voters at a Special Town 
Meeting in October and subsequent special election in 
November. The project is now anticipated to begin in 
March of 1994 with a tentative completion date of 
September 1995. 



ill 



as principal of Medf ield High School I am more than satisfied 
with the many positive happenings which have taken place in 
our school community. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Medfield 
School Committee, the Superintendent of Schools, the 
Assistant Superintendent and the many parents and community 
groups for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert C. Maguire 
Principal 




Brian Miller receives diploma from School 
Mark Wilson. (Courtesy of Suburban Press.) 



Committee Chairman 



112 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



OF 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 1993 



Sunday, June 6, 1993 — 2:00 P.M. 



113 



PROGRAM 



PROCESSIONAL Class of 1993 

"Pomp and Circumstance" - Elgar 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM Victoria Gabriel 

Class of 1993 

OPENING REMARKS Thomas Reis 

Superintendent of Schools 

WELCOME NinaDePalma 

President, Class of 1993 

MESSAGE TO GRADUATING CLASS Robert Magulre 

Principal 

HONOR ESSAYS Elizabeth Sherwood, Valedictorian 

Leighanne Jenkins, Salutatorian 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Peter Cornwell 

Treasurer, Class of 1993 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 1993 Mark Wilson, Chairman 

Medfleld School Committee 
PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

Honor Awards Robert C. Maguire, Principal 

Special Recognition Award 

Friends of Medfleld Library Amy Fiske Memorial Award Dorrie Kanter 

Medfleld School Boosters Award Nancy Standring 

Medfleld School Spirit Awards 

Medfleld Teachers Association Book Award Robin Scharak 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarships Robert Farrell 

American Legion Medals 



I Youth Basketball Association Tom Cowell 

Bob Porack Memorial Awards 

Medfleld High School Theatre Society Awards Regina O'Connor 

Robert Belmont Track and Field Team Spirit Award Ryan Autry 

Student Council Awards Ellen Dugan 

Medfleld Music Boosters Award Robert Hersee 



114 



PRESENTATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS 

American Legion, Department of Massachusetts Scholarship Sharon Semeraro 

Newton-Wellesley Hospital Aid Association Medfield School Committee 

Shaw's Supermarkets Scholarship William Tosches 

McDonald s Leaders Award Medfield School Committee 

John F. Kelly Samaritan Scholarship 

Quinnipiac Academic Scholarship Clarence Purvis 

Dean's Scholarship at Regis College Medfield School Committee 

University of Maine Scholarship 

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council Scholarships Suzanne Pratt 

Peter Pandocco Memorial Scholarship Charles Nolan 

Proud to be Substance Free Scholarship Lauren Gugltetta 

Prudential Page Realty Scholarship Susan Carney 

In memory of Roger C. Rao Assistant Principal 

Amy Fiske American Field Service Scholarship Nina Ciatto 

Madetyn L Grant Scholarships William F. Nourse 

National Honor Society Scholarships Richard Shapiro 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships Theresa Hanlon 

Cecile Levesque Memorial Scholarship 

Christopher Naughton Memorial Scholarship Susan Carney 

Medfield Uons Club Scholarships Robert Sawyer, Jr. 

CIBA Coming Diagnostics Scholarships Clarence Purvis 

Medfield Police Association Scholarship Robert Naughton 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarships Laura Brown 

American Legion. Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship Robert Farrell 

In memory of Ed Duhamel 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary Susan Carney 

Beckwith Post No. 1 10 Scholarship 

Medfield Employers & Merchants Organization Scholarship Mark Cerel 

Dental Health Services Scholarship Brian Thomas 

Roberts-MitcheD Funeral Service Scholarship Tracy Mitchell 

Benjamin Franklin Savings Bank Scholarship Cathy Millani 

Medfield Ladies Spring Tennis Scholarships Linda Frank 

The Marilyn Juda Education Scholarship Marilyn Juda 

Potpourri Collection Scholarship Susanne Knowles 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS* 
Mark F. Wilson, Chairman, Medfield School Committee 
Thomas Reis, Superintendent of Schools 
Robert C. Maguhre, Principal 

RECESSIONAL Class of 1993 

"Consecration of the House" - Beethoven 

* Please refrain from applause until all graduates have received their diplomas. 



115 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES — CLASS OF 1993 



Michael Christopher Alessi 
Anthony Brian Barrese 
Stacy Ann Benhardt 
Jason Paul Berry 
Tare Ann Bleak 
Anthony Philip Brandolo 

t Ateon Catharine Brooks 
Eric James Bunce 
KimberiyAnnByda 
Shane Brian Callahan 

t*Courtney Ellen Cannon 

* Susan Rebecca Ciatto 
Jennifer Kimberry Clark 
Jeffrey Paul Clarke 
Peter Chipman Comwell 
Todd Gerald Culten 
William Danner 

Dawn Michelle Darnell 
Nicholas B.V. Darrel 

* Darlene Lee DeChelis 
Nina Nicole DePalma 
Matthew Eric Dennehy 
Daniel Richard DiMarzo 

* Kelly Ann Dillon 
Nicole Michelle Dolan 

* Julie Ann Dubanowitz 
Steven William Dunlea 
Todd Stephen Duquette 
Jeffrey Charles Eberilng 
Courtney Diane Enz 

t Jennifer Anne Felton 
Sean Richard Rtzpatrick 
Jon Matthews Fletcher 
Tracy Marie Frank 

t Victoria Ann Gabriel 



David Michael Gaffey 
Ivan Garcia 
Amy P. Glennon 
Adam Nathan Gottlieb 
Robert Howard Harrington 
Timothy Charles Heavey 
Anne McCormkk Henry 
Erica Lynne Hunt 
Jason Albert Interrante 
Timothy Wilson Irwin 
Joshua Burnett Jacobs 
Scott Vincent Janovitz 

t'Lekjhanne Martha Jenkins 
Douglas James Kay 
Kevin Philip Kelly 

t'Alisa Nicole Kendrlck 

t'Annika Maria Kobe! 
Matthew John Konevkh 

t#Stephen Eric Korbly 
Alexis Kosc 
Dimltra Athina Kovatsi 
Melanie Jan Lambert 
Garrett William Larkin 

t Erin Price Lengyel 
Colleen Joy Lynch 
Mary Elizabeth MacDonald 
Michael Richard MacGinnis 
Mary Ellen Maguhre 
Michelle Elaine Magulre 

* Michelle Ann Maloof 
Patricia Ann Marcel 
Lynne Marie Marino 
Kenneth Michael Martin 
Kevin Patrick McBride 
Daniel John McCormick 



Michael Richard McKechnie 
Raymond Thomas McKetchnie 

# Brian Andrew Miller 
Catherine Mary Moroney 
Craig Patrick Murphy 
Kristin Ann Negoshlan 
Christine Elizabeth Nolan 
Casiida Orbe-Murua 
Carrie Ann Oscarson 
Nicole Churchill Outchcunts 
Julie Elizabeth Palacio 
Kimberly Ann Palson 
Melanie Ann Pember 
Jan-Marie Placido 
Michael Harold Pritoni 
Daniel Joseph Quintilianl 
Javan Nikomid Rad 
Kara Elizabeth Reardon 
Timothy Russell Robinson 
Jason Joseph Rodriguez 
Melissa Ann Sawyer 
Michelle Terese Scecina 

t*Elizabeth Emily Sherwood 
Jason Fuller Standring 
Lawrence Patrick Sullivan IV 
Mary Kathleen Sullivan 

* Ann-Marie Louise Sweeney 
Andrea Susanne Szebenl 
Adam Peter Talbot 
Gregory Brock Thomson 
Timothy Fmnegan Tunney 

* Meredith Anne Unger 
Jennifer Mary Wamock 
Daniel Christopher Weir 

* Heather Lea Wood 



MARSHALLS 
Jennifer Kamakls Lisa Halllday 



turner 10% of ih« paduaHng class acadmlcalV 
'National Honor Sod«ty 



116 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE 
MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is my pleasure to submit the Thomas A. Blake Middle 
School's Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1993. 

WINTER 

All the french and Spanish students went on separate field 
trips to attend theater productions in January. 

Students participated in the National Geography Bee. Eighth 
grader, Jason Wardwell, was the winner of the Middle School 

I National Geography Bee and advanced to the state finals in 

i Winchester. 

I In February over 400 parents, students and townspeople 

\ attended "Old Medfield on Display," the end result of three 

ii months of research by the students on individuals in 

i Medfield' s past. The display featured house models built by 

I the students on the individuals they had researched. In 

addition to using research facilities such as the Medfield 

Historical Society, Town Hall and Vinelake Cemetery, students 

used the Dedham Registry of Deeds, the state and federal 

; archives and the Mormon Genealogical Research Center to 

complete their projects. 

Foreign language week was celebrated at the middle school. 
The special program included: games, skits and the cooking of 
i traditional foods. 

SPRING 

Eighth grade teachers, Robert Ammon and Richard DeSorgher, 
were selected as presenters at the New England League of 
Middle Schools Conferences in Marlborough and Hyannis. 

Active, hands-on interdisciplinary learning was also evident 
in the Greek Myth Unit as well as the Egyptian studies. 
Community members continued to furnish resources for our 
students. The Performing Arts Council furnished various 
programs and the Medfield Women's Club sponsored a 
babysitting course for interested students. 

In May, 7th graders went on a Walking Tour of Boston field 
trip. The trip emphasizes the urban geography of the city. 
Also, the 7th graders visited the Boston Museum of Science to 
participate in a health workshop, "How Life Begins." 

Early in May, U.S. Congressman John Joseph Moakley was a 
guest speaker before all eighth grade students at the Middle 
School and the students had a follow-up meeting with their 
Congressman on the steps of the U.S. Capitol during their 



117 



Washington, D.C. trip. Later that month, 140 eighth graders 
went to Washington, D.C. and to Colonial Williamsburg over a 
four day period. 

In addition to their regular itinerary, students were able toi 
tour the new Holocaust Museum which had just opened prior to! 
their trip. The Memorial Day Speaker was a 7th grader, Lily- 
Wang. She recited the Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. 

Blake Middle School's Principal, Dr. Robert H. White, 
received the Edmund Fanning Award from the Massachusetts 
Middle School Principals' Association. He was recognized as 
the 1993 Massachusetts Outstanding Middle School Principal of 
the Year. 

During eighth grade graduation exercises, Kerry Jordan 
received the Madelyn Greene Award for Excellence in English 
and David Jordan received the Blanche Kingsbury Award for 
Excellence in History. 

FALL 

In September, Blake Middle School welcomed the Class of 2000 1 
to the sixth grade. The class has 174 students, making it 
the largest class in years. 

Because of the high school construction, middle school 
classes were tightly scheduled with teachers sharing rooms 
and very little flexibility for space needs. 

All eighth graders took part in the Charles River 
Interdisciplinary Unit, held over a one week period. Instead 
of attending their regular classes that week, students 
reported to five different day-long curriculum workshops that 
dealt with different aspects of the Charles River. The 
workshops included canoe trips down the Charles River where 
students conducted water quality experiments and 
discovered local history. Students were involved in poetry 
writing and art drawing on the banks of the Charles, and 
graphing water test results in math. Special thanks to 
Medfield Police Officer Ray Burton and E.M.T. Sally Wood who 
attended all five canoe trips and to the employees at the 
Medfield Waste Water Treatment Plant who toured the students 
through the facility. 

The Never Ending Dig and Science Nature Walk took place in 
October at the 200 year old Wight Farm. Barbara and Mike 
Cronin once again were both generous and hospitable in 
offering their lovely property as well as their knowledge. 
Sixth graders uncovered numerous artifacts dating back 
several decades and observed varied interesting flora and 
fauna. This inquiry based interdisciplinary unit is loved by 
the students and teachers. 

During October, all students participated in an 
interdisciplinary unit on Immigration. The multicultural 
unit included films, assemblies and a large projects fair for 
parents in the evening. Small groups of students researched 



118 



over twenty different ethnic groups, created a cardboard 
figure to represent a person from that nationality and 
presented their findings in the form of charts, graphs and 
skits. 

In November all students had the opportunity to attend an 
overnight field trip to New York City. The emphasis was 
Ellis land and the Statue of Liberty. They attended a 
broadway play, Les Miserables," visited the United Nations 
and toured the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

In December all 7th grade students in English read "The 
Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens. The unit included the 
development and presentation of special projects and 
attendance of the play on the North Shore. 

Blake Middle School was at last able to offer both foreign 
language and reading to all students each year. In addition 
to reading, sixth graders were required to experience 
exploratory foreign language. Students studied french for 
one half year; Spanish for the other half year. Seventh and 
eighth graders took foreign language and either developmental 
reading or the newly designed power reading course. These 
subjects were seen as key to students who will be entering 
the 21st century. 

The eighth grade team developed, in conjunction with the 
high school, a "Big Brother-Big Sister" program to help the 
students have a smooth transition into Medfield High School. 
At the end of the school year students got together for a 
cookout where the eighth grade students are matched with a 
big brother-big sister high school student. During the week 
preceeding the opening of school the high school students 
meet with the eighth grader, gets the student schedule, tours 
the student through the high school and is available during 
the first months of school to help the student with any 
transition problems or questions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert H. White, D.Ed. 
Principal 



19 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Dale Street School, this will be myi 
twenty fifth Annual Report for the year ending December 31 J 
1993. 

Enrollment and Staff 

Enrollment figures at Dale Street as of October 1, 1993, wer< 
185 students in grade four and 166 students in grade five. 
Average class size for grade four was 23.1 and for grade fiv« 
was 23.7. 

The staff who are participating in the Reach Out to School! 
Program this year are Ann Kristof , Lauren Harrington, Laurc 
Nelson, Claire NcKechnie, Miriam Baldwin, Janice Olson and 
Joseph White. This program at Wellesley College, sponsored 
by Roche Brothers, emphasizes positive approaches in th« 
classroom. It provides alternative ways for children toi 
solve problems effectively. Other objectives are to 
establish a pleasant and comfortable environment for children' 
to learn and to establish better relationships with others. 
Several staff members have previously completed this course. 
Eventually all staff members will be trained in or exposed to! 
this worthwhile program. 

Attendance at Professional Workshops and writing of Research 
and Development projects has helped teachers to further 
explore curriculum ideas and different techniques and methods; 
of instruction. 

The sudden death of JoAnne Soyka was a sad loss to the entire 
staff and student body. Fourth and fifth grade students 
composed beautiful expressions of sympathy, in card or 
letter form, that were hand-delivered to her family. 

Curriculum 

Reading continues to be a major focus across the curriculum. 
Classroom instruction and home programs were patterned to 
foster a desire and interest in reading different types of 
literature. 

The purchase of science kits and materials provided students 
with "hands on" activities that have added more excitement to 
the curriculum. 

The health curriculum was formalized for grade four. The 
grade five DARE program began on January 20. Officer Ray? 
Burton taught sessions emphasizing self-esteem, expanding 
students 7 awareness and learning to make the right decisions. 



120 



The "What's it Like?" Program, under the direction of Wendy 
Sullivan and Linda Dunn gave students an awareness and 
understanding of differences among themselves and others. In 
a receptive atmosphere, feelings were shared from stimulating 
activities and students' life experiences. 

Communication skills in writing, book reviews and research 
reports demonstrated students' creativity and formalized 
skills in spelling, sentence structure and grammar. 

The math program is a subject for further evaluation. We 
were investigating the expansion of problem solving 
techniques, critical thinking and more "hands on" approaches. 

In physical education, units in soccer, flag football, floor 
hockey, group problem solving, basketball, gymnastics, 
volleyball and obstacle courses provided students with a 
varied and meaningful program. Presidential Physical Fitness 
Awards were given for excellent scores in running, sit-ups 
and pull-ups. Exercises and obstacle courses were designed 
to increase muscle strength, endurance and flexibility. 

PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

Intramural Program 

The Intramural Program, under the direction of grade five 
teacher Teri O'Brien, had an approximate enrollment of 140 
students. Some were also engaged in more than one activity. 
The enrollment was as follows: 

Session I Computers - 17 Basketball - 27 

Session II Computers - 13 Arts & Crafts - 16 

Session I Sports & Games - 22 Session I Cooking - 22 

Session II Sports & Games - 19 Session II Cooking - 19 

Tumbling - 12 Science Fun - 11 

Softball - 10 Variety Show - 21 
Newspaper - 17 

After School Music Lesson Program 

The fourth grade beginner band had 90 members. The fifth 
grade is continuing its success from last year with 45 
members. All students were enrolled in the After School 
Lesson Program or private lessons. The fourth grade also had 
a beginner string program once a week. 

The annual Spring Concert will be held to demonstrate the 
results of their diligent work. 

Performing Arts 

The leadership of Chris Taft of the Performing Arts Series 
provided students with the opportunity to experience 
performances and to participate in a variety of excellent 
programs . 



121 



Odyssey of the Mind 

The OM Program stressed creative problem solving and 
teamwork. The groups were preparing for future competition 
in the spring. 

Parent/ Staff Involvement 

The conference method of reporting appeared to be an 
effective means of communicating children's progress. This 
year the staff distributed the students' report cards to the 
parents for the first term. 

The School Advisory Council was an important link amongst the 
school, home and the School Committee. Systemwide and school 
matters and a School Improvement Plan were the focuses of the 
Council. The members of the committee are Mary Niles, Nancy 
Thomas (Co-chairperson) , and Mary Boiardi as parent 
representatives, William Pope and Kim Cave as teacher 
representatives and Robert Kinsman as the community 
representative . 

The School Newsletter, Medfield Notebook within the Suburban 
Press, and cable messages all enhanced communication between 
school and home. Parent volunteers were a great help in the 
cafeteria and on field trips. 

FUTURE TRENDS 

The focus on Technology is expanding. Staff and students 
will soon begin to utilize the new equipment and software 
both in the lab and classroom. 

The elementary population will continue to increase at Dale 
Street School for the next few years. As we add more 
sections we will begin to take the spaces occupied by the 
Central Office, Business Office and Pupil Services. 

Teachers will continue to pursue additional ideas on teaching 
techniques and other approaches to students' learning through 
workshops and research and development projects. 

The teaching staff is dedicated and conscientious. They 
demonstrate an eagerness to teach and a caring attitude about 
our children. The school secretary is to be commended for 
her contribution to the operation of the school office. The 
school nurse had a busy schedule with two schools and handled 
it professionally and efficiently. Thank you to the 
volunteers who sacrificed their time to assist with programs 
and activities. The custodians and bus drivers provided 
valuable assistance to the total school situation. We are 
grateful for the C.S.A. and the Medfield Coalition for Public 
Education involvement. We thank the School Committee and 
Central Office for their leadership and direction during the 
school year ending 1993. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Frank J. Hoffman 
Principal 



122 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Please accept this report regarding the educational programs 
and extra curricular activities of the Ralph Wheelock School 
for the year ending December 31, 1993. As Principal, this is 
my second annual report for the Town of Medfield. 

I ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

JThe Wheelock School is proud to have an enrollment of 606 
5 students as of October 1, 1993: 229 in grade one, 19 5 in 
:grade two, 176 in grade three and 6 in a substantially 
I separate class. We currently have ten sections of first 
fc , grade, nine sections of second grade and eight sections of 
third grade. Due to our increased enrollment, the Wheelock 
: School hired three new classroom teachers this year, an 
t additional half time Learning Specialist and five additional 
I classroom aides to assist our large first grade classes. We 
I also have three new staff members in our Special Education 
• Department . 

Our enrollment has prompted some changes in our delivery of 
i instructional programs within the school. The Computer Lab 
! was moved to a small workroom adjacent to the IMC to allow 
for classroom space on the second floor. Two teachers have 
engaged in a team teaching model at the third grade level. 
This classroom houses 41 children and two teachers who are 
teaching through process learning. Both teachers engaged in 
an intense Summer Research and Development project to prepare 
for this model. 

The projected elementary enrollment for the 1994-95 school 
year resulted in the formation of a study committee to review 
the options for reorganizing the elementary schools. The 
recommendation of this committee was to move grade one to 
Memorial School with the kindergarten and prekindergarten, 
maintain grades two and three at Wheelock School, and 
maintain grades four and five at Dale Street School. This 
will be a great loss to the Wheelock School but will have 
great advantages for the children due to the formation of a 
prekindergarten through grade one school. 

September saw the implementation of Grade Level Chairs at the 
Wheelock School. Each grade level has identified one teacher 
as the representative for their grade level. This has 
improved communication between and across the elementary 
grade levels. It has also resulted in increased 
participation of faculty members in site-based management. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The Wheelock School staff continued to look at the teaching 
of reading this year. With the continued guidance of Ms. 
Carolyn Casey, educational consultant, the faculty has 



123 



drafted a Balanced Reading Program, which will be completed 
in the winter of 1994. This program will identify the many 
different types of instructional reading experiences our 
children will have during their years in the elementary 
school. A parent program to present our program will be 
offered in the future. 

An investigation of Developmental Education began this year 
when four faculty members attended a program sponsored by the 
Griffin Center for Human Development in January. This led to 
an In-service program in October for all elementary teachers 
in collaboration with the Walpole Public Schools. A course 
for teachers entitled "Creating Child Centered Classrooms" 
will be offered to elementary teachers in both towns in the 
winter and spring of 1994. 

Faculty and staff members at Wheelock continued their 
implementation of technology through training on the 
Macintosh computer during summer and fall courses. A Mac Lab 
will be put in place at the Wheelock School in the winter of 
1994. Teachers received training on Laserdisk technology as 
part of an In-service program conducted by Optical Data of 
Maynard, Massachusetts. Use of the CDROM, Kidsnet and MCET 
also expanded during the year. 

Collaboration between regular and special education in an 
inclusion model grew during the year. We began this model 
last year and have included more teachers and students 
through summer Research and Development and through an 
In-service for our entire staff. We expect to further expand 
this model in the future. 

Our staff continued to participate in the Reach Out to 
Schools Social Competency Program at Wellesley College by 
increased teacher training. Nearly all teachers at the 
school have received training in this program designed to 
facilitate group problem solving. 

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 

Parents of the Wheelock School provided continued support 
both financially and through volunteerism. The CSA funded a 
residency in playwriting and performance with The Boston 
Children's Theatre for all of the children at the school. 
Our playground was renovated through CSA support and the 
assistance of town resident, Eric O'Brien. The playground is 
now expanded and meets national safety codes. The Wheelock 
Fun Fair, held in June, was the most successful fair in its 
history thanks to parents Mary jean Ingram and Colleen 
Sullivan. Project Extend, an afterschool enrichment program 
for the children, expanded this year through the support of 
the CSA under the direction of Halina Moore. 

Outreach projects to the community developed during this year 
included a May Day project to benefit the Medfield State 
Hospital and various senior citizen programs and the 
development of an "adoptive" grandparent program with the 
assistance of Margaret Jenkins, recently retired Wheelock 

124 



teacher. It is expected that this program will continue 
to grow during the upcoming year. 

A Parent Education Program on Whole Language Reading 
Instruction was held in January. The evening presented new 
trends in teaching reading to increase parental awareness. A 
parent/child program on drug awareness by ventriloquist Judy 
Buch was held in the spring. This program was sponsored by 
the Health Education Program in Medfield. 

Through the Education Reform Bill, Wheelock School began its 
School Council in October. The council consists of four 
parents, one community member, three Wheelock teachers and 
myself. Items addressed in the fall included the school 
budget and planning for our School Improvement Plan. 
Meetings will continue throughout the school year. 

Many high school students have become a part of the Wheelock 
School Community through two different programs. Our Student 
Aide Program, under the direction of the High School Guidance 
Department, grew from two students to nine students 
providing daily assistance in our classrooms. The Science 
Department, under an Eisenhower Grant, also brought many 
students to the school to provide additional instruction in 
hands-on science education. Both programs have benefited our 
children greatly. 

FUTURE 

The Wheelock School will continue to operate in a highly 
professional manner due to the high level of dedication of 
its faculty and staff. We are looking at assessing our 
mathematics and science curriculum and expect to apply to the 
National Science Resource Center in Washington, D. C. for 
their Leadership Institute. We will continue to refine our 
reading instruction and will begin reviewing new choices for 
reading materials. As in the past, we continue to provide 
quality educational services for the young children in town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Susan A. Whitten 
Principal 



125 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The report for the Memorial School is for the school ye«i 
ending December 31, 1993. 

The Class of 2006 was welcomed to the Memorial Schoc 
Kindergarten on Tuesday, September 14 at the open nous 
program. Teachers prepared for the beginning of school wit 
individual home visits. The aides were setting up ti 
classroom and the volunteers collated packets of informatic 
for the parents. 

Enrollment and Staff 

Enrollment for kindergarten was 193 students. There were t€ 
sections of kindergarten with five in the morning and five j 
the afternoon sessions. The integrated kindergarten progre- 
consisted of a small class with a full time aide. Thi 
program was initiated to best meet the needs of students ar 
to provide more individual instruction. 

Paula Moran continued to represent the school on thi 
"Celebrating Writing" Committee. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

The continuance of Alpha Time with its exciting letter peopl 
and follow up activities provided children with a high! 
motivated program. They developed their vocabulary aid 
learned their sounds, it led into the "Big Books" progran 
which developed students' vocabulary and reading skills. 

The focus on self-esteem and self-confidence was eviden 
through the "Special," "Star of the Day" activities and th 
Reach Out to Schools Program. 

The hands-on-science activities and the utilization of mat 
manipulatives, gave students exciting and enrichin 
experiences. Volunteers assisted in the science and compute 
programs . 

Physical education, music and the library programs adde 
enrichment and balance to the curriculum. 

The new health curriculum began in November with Kare 
Graham, a certified health teacher. The program was funde 
from a state grant. 

Parent /Staff Involvement 

The School Advisory Council met frequently during the year t 
discuss school matters and to review the budget and formulati 
a school improvement plan. The members were Susan Green 



126 



teacher; Lois Cardell, school nurse; Lois Ashcroft, parent; 
and Celine Pochebit, parent/co-chairperson; Nancy Savoie, 
parent; and Jean Kingsbury, community member. 

Thanks to the generosity of the Memorial C.S.A. many 
wonderful and helpful items have been purchased for the 
children. They have established a complete publishing center 
in the Memorial School Library, along with a laminating 
machine, so that the children could actually write their own 
books. A lending library for parents to use was added. This 
was located in the school lobby and contained many 
interesting and helpful books on children. 

future Trends 

Memorial School for the 1994-95 school year will have 
preschool, kindergarten and grade one. This plan will allow 
the children to remain at the school for at least a two year 
period and provide a smooth transition between kindergarten 
and first grade. 

Summary 

A dedicated and conscientious staff gave the children an 
excellent beginning to their public school experience. The 
volunteers in the classroom and the special programs, 
contributed meaningful and interesting activities. The 
Performing Arts Council has sponsored several wonderful 
programs. The custodians and the bus drivers are to be 
commended for their daily efforts. The school secretary 
deserves special recognition for maintaining good public 
relations and for her service to parents, staff and the 
children. 

The C.S.A. continued to be a valuable supportive organization 
to the Memorial School during the 1993 school year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank J. Hoffman 
Principal 



127 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is my pleasure to submit the Pupil Services Department 
report for the year ending December 31, 1993. 

aeisiM BpncMam 

The overall student census continues to grow annually; 
however, for the second consecutive year, the special needs 
census has remained constant. 

StVKtentS December i, 199? December 1. 
1993 

. I 

ages 3-5 33 30 

ages 6-17 240 243 

ages 18-21 2 2 

282 280 

Most of our special needs children receive their services in 
their home community. Only seven students require placement 
in programs outside Medfield as indicated below: 

December JL, 199? pecenfter Lu 

1993 

Integrated Preschool (Sped only) 7 8 

Integrated Kindergarten 2 

Wheelock Sub Separate 8 6 

Dale Co-Teaching 7 

Middle School Sub Separate 9 11 

Collaborative Placements 7 6 

Private Day 1 

Residential _l _2. 

40 35 

We have other children who are quite challenged who receive 
their education in our regular classrooms through an 
inclusion model. This model combines the skills of a regular 
educator with a special needs teacher in the classroom 
working with any child who needs help. Thus far, we have 
been experiencing the successful integration of students as 
well as the successful assimilation of academic skills 
and knowledge for all involved. It is our plan to expand 
inclusion throughout the system. 

PRESCHOOL SERVICES/PROGRAMS 

Our integrated preschool continues to be extremely successful 
and popular. Entrance to the program is automatic for three 
and four year olds who have been evaluated as having three 
areas of special need. Typical children must seek acceptance 
through a lottery. Unfortunately, we are able to take only 



128 



one-third of the children who apply because we do not have 
room to expand this self-supporting program. However, we 
are able to accommodate close to 50 youngsters each year. 

In addition to our integrated program, speech/ language 
services are provided for special needs three and four year 
olds at the Memorial School. 

Any parent or preschool teacher who suspects a young child 
may not be developing at the anticipated rate may be referred 
for an evaluation by calling or writing to the Pupil Services 
Office. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Each staff member was provided with universal precaution 
Aids/HIV packets which are attached in a visible location in 
each of our classrooms, offices or work space. 

All staff members and volunteers in our schools are required 
to produce evidence of freedom from tuberculosis by means of 
a Mantoux intradermal skin test. If such persons did not 
have a certificate, our school nurses offered free clinics to 
approximately thirty people. 

Our nurses, Dr. Stewart Galeucia and trained volunteers 
provided vision and hearing screening for 2026 youngsters 
last year. Seventy-eight children were referred to 
physicians for further evaluation. 

Trained physical educators and the nurses completed postural 
screening for 714 children last year. This screening 
resulted in 15 confirmed cases of scoliosis. 

Nurses continue their vigilance over students entering our 
schools for the first time. Children may be unable to attend 
unless they meet stringent state requirements for lead paint 
screening and immunizations. 

GUIDANCE SERVICES 

While we continue to have two guidance counselors at our high 
school, we have guidance services only two days each week at 
the middle school due to budget constraints. Consequently, 
group guidance services are available to students in grades 
9-12. 

The G.I.S. (Guidance Information System) is updated annually 
for our high school students. This computer program gives 
students current information about colleges and financial 
aid. The program also provides occupational/vocational 
information. 

PERSONNEL 

Mrs. Claudia Michaels-Brodsky chose not to return to her Dale 
St. position. Consequently, Ms. Elizabeth Dugan continues to 



129 



provide resource room and inclusion services for special 
needs youngsters in grades 4 and 5 . 

Mrs. Beverly Gordon was hired half time to provide inclusion 
services at Wheelock while Mrs. Sandy Brennan replaced Ms. 
Ann Coffey as teacher of the substantially separate class at 
Wheelock. Ms. Coffey is now teaching the integrated 
kindergarten at Memorial School. 

Mrs. Carol Amato requested a second year leave of absence and 
Mrs. Maralyn Kail is replacing her as speech pathologist at 
Wheelock School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lois E. Lambert 

Director of Pupil Services 




Dale Street School National Geography Bee finalists 



130 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD 
ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

In the spring of 1993 I assumed the duties of Director of the 
Adult Education Program from John Cuoco. 

The September 1993 Adult Education Program is currently 
entering the second semester of this year. The fall semester 
initially offered twenty-one (21) courses. Two hundred and 
fifty participants registered. 

The winter semester (January - May) will be offering 
seventeen (17) courses as some have full rosters from 
September . 

New courses offered this year include Financial Planning for 
Women, Introduction to Computers, Tennis, Umpiring Baseball, 
Chair Caning, Quilting, Creative Fiction Writing and Adult 
Cooking. 



We have retained strong offerings of Basketball, 
Education, Aerobics, Volleyball and Golf. 



Drivers 



The Adult Education Program is continually looking to expand. 
The program is self-supporting from the current fee 
structure . 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph White 

Director of Adult Education 




Mrs. Shay's first grade students 



131 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my ninth annual report as the Medfield 
Public Schools Director of Athletics for the year ending 
December 31, 1993. The interscholastic athletic program 
provides Medfield' s youth a positive, disciplined and 
enriching atmosphere in which to develop both as an athlete 
and a person. It is my pleasure to report that over 
seventy-four percent of the entire student body participated 
in athletics during the past year. This ever growing 
statistic reveals the significant role athletics plays in the 
educational process. In Medfield, academics and athletics go 
hand in hand. Each contributing to the overall development 
of Medfield's children. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at three 
levels during the past year. The following is the entire 
athletic coaching staff by season: 



WJEMTIE 
Basketball (Boys) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Herbert Grace 
Michael Mason 
Michael Douglas 



Basketball (Girls) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Thomas Cowell 
Susan Cowell 
Elizabeth Dugan 
Colleen O'Brien 



Cheering 

Ice Hockey 

Indoor Track (Boys) 

Indoor Track (Girls) 

SP RIW ? 



Susan Medina 
Mark Trivett 
Stuart Palmer 
Michael Slason 



Baseball 
Nickerson 



Varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Richard 

Martin Salka 
Herbert Grace 



Softball 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Suzanne Pratt 
Stacia Peters 
Elizabeth Dugan 



Tennis (Boys) 
Tennis (Girls) 



Vincent Joseph 
Ross Irwin 



132 



Track and Field (Boys) 

Track and Field (Girls) 

FALL 

Cheering 
Cross Country 
Field Hockey 

Football 



Soccer (Boys) 

Soccer (Girls) 

Volleyball 
Buettner 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 



Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



Varsity 
Junior 



Varsity 



Edward Rock 
Neil DuRoss 
(Assistant) 

Michael Slason 
Neil DuRoss 
(Assistant) 



Susan Medina 

Michael Kraemer 

Loretta Fahey 
Pauline Carey 

Vincent Joseph 
Michael Slason 

(Assistant) 
William Young 

(Assistant) 
Joseph Farroba 
Herbert Grace 

Edward Rock 
Scott Ferguson 

Allen McCarthy 
Tara Benhardt 

John Hastings 

Michelle 



All of our interscholastic teams participated in the 
Tri-Valley League which consists of Ashland, Bellingham, 
Dover- Sher born, Hoi listen, Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, 
Millis and Westwood. Medfield is currently ranked fifth in 
the TVL in total enrollment, grades nine through twelve. The 
league is highly competitive in all sports, boys and girls. 
Tri-Valley teams traditionally are quite successful in state 
tournament play. This past school year Medfield placed 
second for all schools in Eastern Massachusetts Division IV 
in competition for the prestigious Dalton Award presented 
annually by the Boston Globe. Criteria is based on the 
number of varsity sports offered and the winning percentage 
of both boys and girls teams in those sports. This is a 
winning percentage of both boys and girls teams in those 
sports. This is a wonderful tribute to our student-athletes 
and to the outstanding job our coaching staff has done. 

Our athletic highlights begin with the winter season, 
1992-93. The girls indoor track team went undefeated for the 
third year in a row, won the TVL championship and placed four 
team members on the all league team. Our boys indoor team 
finished third in the league. Boys basketball, coming in at 
13-7, won the TVL championship and qualified for state 



133 



tournament play. Captain, Matt Konevich was named the league 
MVP. Our girls won the Viking Christmas Tournament, held in 
East Bridgewater, for the third consecutive year, finished at 
17-3 and advanced to the sectional quarter-finals. Captain 
Michelle Scecina finished her career with 1112 rebounds, an 
all time mark. Ice hockey placed third in the TVL and just 
missed tourney play with a record of 10-8-2 . 

The spring of 1993 was filled with great performances. Boys 
tennis, with a record of 10-6, qualified again for the state 
play and tied for the TVL championship. Junior Brandan 
Cutter was named the league's Most Valuable Player for the 
third consecutive year. The girls team finished fourth in 
league play at 9-7, just missing tournament qualification. 
Softball, while qualifying for the sixteenth consecutive 
year, played to a 11-7 record. They advanced to the 
sectional semi-finals. Coach, Suzanne Pratt, after twenty 
very successful seasons leaves a strong program in place. We 
will miss her. Baseball finished at 12-6 and in second 
place. They captured the South Sectional Championship 
through timely hits and an outstanding pitching staff. Dick 
Nickerson was named "Baseball Coach of the Year." The girls 
track team placed second in the TVL and finished at an 
impressive 9-1-0. Over the past four seasons, their record 
stands at 35-1-2! Our boys finished 7-3 and placed second in 
a particularly strong league. Co-captain Mike McKechnie was 
undefeated in the javelin. 

Fall 1993 proved exciting for our boys cross country team. 
They finished 5-3 overall and second in the TVL. MVP Brian 
Polagye set a new Medfield course record for sophomores. The 
girls team was young and very competitive coming in at fourth 
place while showing great promise. The varsity football team 
combined exciting wins and large participation (eighty-one) 
to finish fourth in the tough TVL. The Thanksgiving day 
victory over Dover-Sherborn was well attended and the second 
in a row over the Raiders. Seniors Jon Dunn and Derrick 
Clark were named Homecoming and Thanksgiving MVP's, 
respectively. A young girls soccer team was competitive in a 
strong league, improving steadily each game. The boys 
qualified for post season, going 10-5-3 and finished fourth 
in the TVL. Senior Marc Mercadante was named an All Eastern 
Massachusetts player. Volleyball finished 13-7 and qualified 
for tourney play for the first time since 19771 A third 
place finish coupled with many exciting matches made it a 
season to remember. Field Hockey placed third in the TVL and 
went to the States with a 8-3-5 mark. Sophomore Alexis Allen 
set a new season record with ten shutouts. 

Sports recognition evenings in November, March and May were 
well attended and enthusiastically received. The annual All 
Sports Banquet, sponsored by the Medfield School Boosters was 
held in early June. Medfield High School's "Wall of Fame" 
1993 inductees included: Alan Evans, Class of 1957; 
Teacher-Coach George Ruggiero; April Goodwin, '73; Mark 
Boulter, '76; Karen McQuillen, '86. Each inductee was in 
attendance and briefly addressed the audience of over 500 



134 



student-athletes and parents. At the banquet, in addition to 
the individual sport MVP awards, Courtney Cannon and Tim 
Irwin were named the 1992-93 Scholar Athlete recipients. At 
the June graduation exercises, Garrett Larkin and Nina 
DePalma were named recipients of the School 

Boosters Spirit Award. The Robert Porack Memorial Basketball 
Scholarships given by Medfield Youth Basketball Association 
(MYBA) were awarded to Michelle Scecina and Matt Konevich. 
The Robert Belmont Memorial Track and Field Spirit Award was 
presented to Michael McKechnie. 

Tri-Valley League All Star selections for 1993 are as 
follows: 



Boys Basketball 



Sean Fitzpatrick 
Craig Murphy 
Matt Konevich 



Girls Basketball 



Michelle Scecina 
Meredith Dunn 
Valerie Dolan 



Ice Hockey 



Bob Harrington 
Jeff Berks 
Doug Kay 
Dan Ruzzo 



Boys Indoor Track 



Mike McKechnie 
Tony Brandolo 
Shane Callahan 
Jeff Mohan 



Girls Indoor Track 



Kathy Sullivan 
Liz Sullivan 
Meredith Unger 
Judy Fitzpatrick 



Baseball 



Todd Cullen 
Mike Pritoni 
Matt Dennehy 
Jon Dunn 
Steven Dunlea 
Garrett Larkin 



Softball 



Tracy Frank 
Michelle Scecina 
Debbie Kerr 



Girls Tennis 



Anne Henry 



Boys Tennis 



Marc Mercadante 
Bill Foran 
Brandon Cutter 
Adam Gottlieb 



135 



REPORT OF THE FOOD SERVICE DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit this Annual Report for the 
Food Service Department for the year ending December 31, 
1993. 

Promoting good health and nutrition has always been a 
concern. Government regulations require that a lunch must 
follow the Daily Dietary Guidelines and be available to all 
school children. 

Medfield Schools' kitchens are especially concerned with the 
students' fat content in the weekly menus. We oven bake. We 
do not fry foods. Schools offer a variety of milk (whole, 
1%, 2%, skim, chocolate 1/2%) . I try and balance the weekly 
menus with school made products, prepared foods and the use 
of government commodities. I have to offer lunches to the 
students that I know they will purchase, as well as meals 
that will be nutritionally healthy. Some menus, especially 
at the younger levels, appear very repetitive. At the high 
school level when a new product is offered, sometimes we find 
that it is not worth the effort and expense as students 
prefer to purchase and eat lunches they know they will like. 

The high school students are offered daily the choice of 
three "deli" style sandwiches, deep dish pizza or a salad 
bar, along with the regular lunch offerings. This age group 
requires more variety and choices. 

The prepaid meal ticket is offered by the year, half-year and 
monthly. This continues to be successful and is very helpful 
to working parents. 

Most of the food costs are on a yearly bid. Some of these 
prices have been obtained due to the fact that Medfield is a 
member of "The Educational Cooperative." Other bids I obtain 
from vendors. Most products are purchased by brand name. 
The cafeteria managers keep me informed of products that are 
liked and products that are unacceptable. 

I have been involved with the architect for the high school 
kitchen renovations. There have been adjustments made to 
help reduce the total cost and only a few small pieces of 
equipment have been added, as well as a much needed walk-in 
freezer. 

With the increase of students at Wheelock, one person was 
hired to set up a "snack and milk" area in the cafeteria in 
order to keep the line moving more quickly. 



136 



I have made suggestions to update and upgrade the Memorial 
School kitchen which is scheduled to open in September of 
1994. Plans will need to be made in the spring when more 
exact decisions have been made. 



Lunch Receipts 

$117,974.15 

Functions and 

Vending: 

128.815.56 

Government 

$246,789.71 



$195,925.34 

Claim: 
$252,278.16 



Food & Supplies: 

25,699.60 

30.653.22 



Respectfully submitted, 

Sharon Martin 

Food Service Director 




Sixth grade Greek banquet. 



137 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 
OF PLANT MANAGEMENT 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

This has been a year of significant change and improvement in 
the physical plants including great expectations in areas of 
environmental quality and economic operation. Effective 
management of maintenance budget accounts has produced 
another year of significant savings. 

Within the fiscal budget reduction for the plant management 
area, significant progress has been accomplished in several 
areas of operation. 

GENERAL 

Replacement of the 1969 tractor with a new 1993 Ford tractor 
equipped with bucket- loader and backhoe attachments has 
increased the capability of maintenance personnel to deal 
with groundskeeping and snow removal chores. 

Annual inspection, maintenance and repair of cafeteria 
kitchen equipment and as needed repair and replacement of 
electric motors was performed by maintenance personnel 
eliminating the cost of several contracted services. 

The first fault-free annual state inspection of boiler and 
compressed air equipment, in many years, was conducted this 
year. 

Chimneys, flues and smoke boxes in the four oil burning 
facilities received an annual cleaning and inspection. 

The Director of Plant Management worked closely with the High 
School Planning and Building Committee, architects, and 
engineers to furnish input on building maintenance problems, 
conditions and operations and providing information relative 
to the renovation proposal and bid process. 

An offer was received from Bay State Gas Company to convert 
the four oil burning schools to natural gas fuel at no cost 
to the town including the replacement of 20 year-old burners, 
upgrading piping, meters and services, permit ing and 
engineering services. The proposal also included removal of 
underground storage tanks eliminating a substantial 
environmental liability, installation of controls, 
insulation, and air exchange equipment modifications. It 
was projected that while fuel costs would not be reduced, 
environmental quality and safety would be significantly 
improved. First phase implementation began in July. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Several heating system leaks requiring replacement of several 
sections of piping were experienced this year. Samples of 



138 



deteriorated piping and fixtures were supplied to the High 
School Planning and Building Committee. Relocation of 
several classrooms and related equipment from the High School 
manual arts shop was implemented. The move is required by 
the conversion of the garage to classrooms with the High 
School addition plan. 

MIDDLE SCHOOL 

The boiler room was cleaned and walls painted by custodial 
personnel. Additional asbestos insulation removal and 
replacement with non-asbestos material was completed around 
smoke boxes of two boilers by certified contractors. 
Reaction to a delayed ignition in one of the boilers loosened 
recently applied non-asbestos insulation which had to be 
removed and replaced again. 

Continuing operational problems with oil fired burners 
required more than usual attention of maintenance personnel. 

DALE STREET SCHOOL 

The long overdue roof repairs to the east side of the 
cafeteria and adjacent classrooms were completed. 

RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Following many complications, the replacement for the 
emergency generator was finally received and placed in 
service. 

With the cooperation of the Highway Department, maintenance 
personnel implemented renovations to the playgrounds to 
accommodate equipment donated by the Wheelock Community 
School Association. Paving and final equipment installation 
was completed by outside contractors. 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

A significant steam leak was repaired in the heating system. 
This required sawing through eight inches of concrete floor 
to reach the broken pipe. Asbestos removal by a certified 
contractor under the supervision of a certified engineer took 
place with air testing and other environmental compliance 
requirements being done. A non-asbestos insulation was then 
applied to the repaired area. 

Custodial personnel cleaned the boiler room and painted walls 
and floors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert Fitzgerald 

Director of Plant Management 



139 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1993 



141 





iH iH 0) 




»H rH iH ±) 




Q) -H-H W 4J 




> 0) OC0) >i 




fc U 2 25 H <d U J-l T3 W >-i C 




(d fl)HC^ ^ Q) 3 rH-H30 rH>, (0 (d 




XX .CH-HOO rH JQ <d M C -H£ fa 0)-H 




•h w w -h 4J ^ aen (cq c s 4J ti u w 




CO-H-HK^CGWO «H •»-» <d 0> 0) >iQ) 




<d c > fa <d c c <d fa ^uiditou csh^oc 




3 (d • 2 >« >i ^ 04JKS5-H W <d H-O«h0l 




l-D^Q.Hj J J <tf . «0-H ^CC0)0)-H^O > 




w fa >i g w S£«a)«da»-H»-jcs-H^«oo 

£ C li^aiQI id SSCS0)H C <D <d W K 






(dficca)(d-H-HW(d>ia) c HH(d«(>,QQo) 

h(d<^scc utj ait fl< raj: o cj oitj ^ a> 






ow rH«d cc<d3(d0rHc c^u^bco-Hflic 




A^0 4itriooO'HidhHflii«io>Hi4 73 a> c ^ .c <d 




<UWbKk^UUiJJfflfl)g-H'dEH«HCflJ!5i0^tH-H 
Q rdO a C <d Q C -H < -H Q)Q 






-d'd'dgss'd'dO'didflift -h »o »g <d .h »o • « «d 


CM 


•decs ccwcwfa 'dJcco-dscs c-o 


0» 


c<d<drd'0'0<d(d id-H »d c <d <d Chid t* <d c 


a 


«j cc 'dJTJCrt'd TJ<d ^ c <d 


H 


• . . <d id • • c • c<d c • • c tj • a> <d • 




• bS> wwidh-did . <d fa a (d • c fa .c fa* 


« 


s • • c • x fa id & • w 


o 


W -d^XJIHiSHH . g (d • < «HH . >iOUg 


fa 


6H*d^04J 0)0)<<d b 4J<0)0)KW«J34J (d4J 




S5rHid-Ho»42wid(d -hc 'd^i <d<d <d 5 -P w w -h ^ 

W«J ) flkCa(D££ldH.H^.HQ)H 1 C^ ( «g O'HOIHd) 


H 


Ej 


«C04JCrHgOOCrH>^>ja-HOO^O>lg^gHA 

<o-Hid cii« id-H-Hid-H4)ididot)'H-HidAiO'H£id'HO 


5 

Q 


faafa-faK£h>££a:s»£att2£££EHH)HOi-):2tt 


3 

H 


• 
c 

£ 0) (d - CO 


H 


C 0>'0'3>C 0) <dC 


X 


T3 rdw g-Cr-io <d c c ><d 




w^o c>-iwo-H(dC £ oc<d -h »j en 


% 


CCiOChnXD^HSM O r-l >, a O .C H H ^ >, 


H 


<D-H^o(i)j3d(!)o tiucoHQjacidiiiHidoiQ)^ 
o h s-p 'doa)'dx:a)^^<i)U(da<dC^a)scAjQ^ 




Q 


UHlflW.H3S(DUCNOWg^S3fl)04JW-H-H^O) 
IOKT3idffliJ3ti-H4Jfa^ gWOJS^ 4JOOCQ 


H 


g 


•HO -H S J«J4J-H <dO)'H Id W W W 55 

44 J C £ CQWfa^JH«0>W4->^i3C-H <D 


O 


>'00 Cld4JC -H fc h -h-h^oo-h^ohc 


U 


HMM-HC<dr-ia)(d •MC(dua)C^CQ)-Htf^^(da>-H 


n 


<sx:+JO»TH<da) o> goosoo^oo) .c c 


e: 




55 oiflh SN««d ai c io -h b Q«<d-Hcua)0)oa) 


CO 


• •Hfa a»o-H m iom idhS a) fa ^ > c-hh 


H 


WCQfa g fi (OH IflTJ^ -H >HH >i nlldQI'HSid 


H 


Cld-HgWUC+JHU^HOlHJI.fl^.H.H^ > 


« 


Qio^-H-HH uidca)ua)Q)^:a)<d-PQ) &> > a> u 


H 


iJ<l)(y+JHfl)CCfl)Xid-H«Hk£4J£X!O^C^(llX!fl)C 


n 


HgHWHg > C-HJ2fl)gCM'dU4JUUfi , d-HOC4J4J(d 

K(d>i:3-Hgo^a>Hflj<«.cc<d<d-H-H-HC^a><i)<da>> 

UbhhSWhW«<WQUrt!«SSgEH<WOO«(i(W 







Hooaeon^^vo\coMn\OM^HHHNnTrinhooo 

HHHHNNNNNIN HHHNNINNNNNNNn 



bbl4^bbbV4bbl4l4l4bbllbbbbbllbbb 




142 







>1 >i C >i«H 10 






.CH >iC(0 W <0 G 0) H 3 






rHCy Pi H H ^ CO >i> 0) 10 0) -H 






CH-Hfl) fcd) rHWOQ)-H 0)-H W fO .G G 






o a> ,* c <o 3 « c o a c c ^ ^ c .h >i inuocy>i 






CO CO -H +J S O C g (C -H C (0 CU-H r-l >, rH -P rH <0 






H Bl flj -H H 4J • -P G O 0i <0 <0 S HH 3HH ^ 0) -H <0 ^ 






•H g H 0) ' 41 b H 0X3 CQCT> «HW CO H -H UCSWO 






5J-I CT>'04a<W 3 (OUEh • 0)0) ,* -H •HCDCT'-H 






Eh.-HC^ M >i O G W >i G CO OSCU cyQ)tfCQ)«3Q).S 


00 




^>Cl)0>i00S3»<D ^ C-HH (0 -HT3C« -H ^ C> 




<• su^sc jbC4Jm-HCHN,c^o-H z x u U-* 


0) 
0> 




<Jrd» tO <0 • -HCUSfeCU-H -P <0 O -P 3 O iSOiOCU 




C U < • '6C2J -4JH M QSOiQJESCOOJCEJPG 
JO^I'O 55 2 0> 0) H (D Q) (D C • -HJ2 -H PI O 3 < C 




r- 




WCDGQ) WrH-OXJ k3c7»Q)P<<dGV-i<d<0fd^ >i W 0) R3 fl >i (0 


z 




W4JWrHO«J«W(0-H-HtrOfliHC^<S*HCOO^(«iH-HC <0 3 




<o 3 c -h 'd^^flE-HGrt ho^ flg^idcogw 






CKC £ CCEn E 2 T3 P) OC EC TJ-OW rtJ'O'd 


Q 

-J 




<d rt'd -o <o <o *o «« co o ^ <o -o tj <o o c c tj cc 




TJ COG J-iCO-O <0 CO G <0 C CO G i0 <0 73 G • <0 <0 




• C -(flCfl • -(DrtCC • (fl C (flU • (flflJ C • (0 G <0 E 


LU 




WfOb <0 U P) G (0 (00 • (0 S (8b • • <0 






a. b. • »o •• • W O • G b b3 


E 


CO 


O ->iS '5>(>iOb • -H W.PiGCtfO'iHW • £ -H 


Q 


E-" 


^ < G fa ,C 0) -P Ub d)4J Oi <00) 5 0) ,G.Ch> E -P -P 


z 


(0 OO U -P P CO CO rC P -P 10 £ 0"> G (OCAQiQi CO <0 P P 


LU 


K 


CHCHCQ)0<H-H(DHHj|(D4JC(DC Qi-H (fl^^GQKDMflJ-nQKD 


9 


U^4J>^4Jg<wkg33U£O^g^ai(0-H^UgWM^gC^^ 


Z 
O 


•HflC(flOei-HCI£(fliflilJ-HOUO(flO4JMk(0-HUOOiflflJfl)OH 


Pi 


«U<Qbi^^bUbAft2«cobbbwup3SSb)hbSb)Datf<! 




>i -H 


LU 




• H G TS H 


O 




CO <0 P. rH J3 -H-HJ-lrH 




X Q) -H h)Q) W 0* C -H C 4J (0 41 


oc 




03 >iG O G <D O -HP (0 CO -H P XJ TJ 




O O 1 a»<0G0)G C-G CT>^^ <0 O g -H ^ (d u ^ 


o 




p to-pr-coajG-H movocodh kg g <» p <o e 3 <o 


o 




.Q bH0(fl-H0>£UUWUfl30(fl G GCGOOO O-H 




rHTJ 3OffiPU<0C03-HO Eb-HHC'H .*0G-HPE3<1>CQ0 


LU 




O-O'fOE-i CQ PI .H ,-) 3 tf * <w &>U<0<0XOU-Hfafa PI p O 




EOQ-H*Q)*10 fC<DO O <W ,* 3 rH^O-HKfa Q) -H 0) -H 


tc 




H 'MOHODgSQhlO'HOOOkOWU^O <u en c ,c -p w tf 
-o tfa) o rH«o p p k -h « <u 5 a> wgg-h+jg-h 


tf% 


W 


p .p icoc^'Hcm .(A4J p ^ £a>'oa>a>-Ho<oa>H3fc 


Mi 


s 


(0 -p P Eh Oi-h •H(0Hll|J<^(flC4JW(DCfl)«l«Ug^KH ( quoO 


X 


.G O Q> QI2^CH(D-H Q)CU<dfOQ>P.C,GOP(0<d<l> W <0 E P3 G 


55 


OO^.CO OU-HH«(DO Xl^gffiO-Ptfb^b^id N O 




•Hwa«o>iW 5£ c cw (0 b<P o ^->^a)-Hca)U 


ec 


W 


« O b)G G +J (0 -H H O fib)<0 <0C>1 M T3 H H -H C 


«» 


5 -P £ (OC0(OG(0l0MQ)l0M(0 (0^SOf!ldaiMCH«6-H£ 


en 


Q 


Ga>coac.P-H-HOttLo<i)(0-Ho-H^wo w^-hjs roa) ion a 


P) 


■HM-HBIflHJCH4J •H.fl.fl hHH0).H-H0)-HOH4J>iX l fl Id n 81 fl) 




H 


>'O^C0-H.HGrHrH>iKi4JO>H>irH4JiHrHrHrHfi<l)4J>-l<l)U^G'OC0 




ffi 


fl)C£0^hd-HOEid(d-H(dfl-H(D(DHOH-H 1 qid(dH-HidoiidO 




U 



vot^r^coovDoocT\onLninLnHnr)incN^Hn'*Lnvovovovot^r > »LnLO 

HHHHfMCNCMCNCMn HHCMCNCMC^CMCMCNCgCMCN 



>-lV4^>-l^l^^^l^l>-(>-l>-l^^<0<0 
(0<0i0<0f0i0<0<0(0<0 

GGGGGGCCGG 



>i>i>i>i>i>i>i>i>i>i>i>i>i>i>i 



P 

(0 

<0 (0 <0 3 3 3 

3 3 3 P U U 



(0(0<0<0(0(0(0(0<0(0i0i0 
333333333333X3^ 



c c c^3jai2^i3^^jaxijaja^ja^i3 



id(0<d(did(0(0(d(diO(d(0(0«s<u<u<i)C)<i)Q)<UQ)<u<u<u<i)0)Q)(U 



u u 

10 (0 



b3bbb)b)bb)h)hJh)h)h)b)b)fcfefofcfefafafefefcfafafefcli,5:5: 



143 



X! G >i 

DOC 3 


G 

id 


•h w id c h <a 


> >i >i 


> ^ C O 0) rH Q) 


•rtr-i M r4 M 


OOC W 0) G 0) H H 4J 


rH rH O O rH O 


g-H 01 -0 M 0) C 0) H G 


rH Q) -H W -H 0) Id -H 


tibb MO) W -H C 1-4 0) -H Id CM 


3 « ^ WO) 0>'0 fc H 


M d ffl G (DtP G-PO O T3>^ id U O 


W W Idtf TJ-H -OH 


& G W M G <D 0) <d -P U £ W O id 0) 0) G 
Sj Q) G rH Q) O J 0) « Id -H O CO -H W fa G -H G 


GO) rH 0) Id W H 0) 


M »4JCQ IdflJHHgHOft 


S CH4J *H rH 0» .r-IO N M O 0) X! O 
•H ^-HW fa C rH . ffl rtj *jj rH •QOSHOU) 


o)<o> a) o -h ih 4-» hu id 


tr xjco Midd'HOU 


H. £ H C H W 0) <d«b Ol H Id rH 


GGid(did>i<dKtf£W£ 


•H £ -P A3 0) • < id G (13 V Id Oh fa • O 4) fa M <D 


(d 0) N 0) S M £ 


ha o> c -h m £ k-hgm-hki (KU«h via 
6 u >i u o id v < id m id >iG M id id id 


^0)Hb id c M -h id id hJ 


OHH -P£ld>«0>k'drH 


•H -H Id .< H £ id rH Q) -H A A rJ Id « 0) C 0^'H O G 


G fa 0) 0) G M <w U C -H id 


m fa &> id cci'HVCkSMhcmO'HU a) 


G +J -H^6Gx:*HO)(dO)G 
OJid-O^id-HO^GXJgXJG 
M fa G 3 O^fa Q (C CW<WO 


<d ^caidGgMKCid idfiidid-HiHXj-HQ)^ 


WCSi-OSQftOTJJ pH (0 OH P G fa 


id id <d m fa a) a 


id ^ c id qg 'd-H'OO'd'OJ TJid^ 

•d TJOidnTd-d iddChjCKCC T* G fa J d 


fad J <d tj d «-)*d d d 


C» SCCd GGCO 


G • G a ccd Gid id ididTJCid c d id i-3 d ididCdidididG 


<d < id • d <d id c • id 'O tj G<d tj tj id 


G G V <d G id 


• u c id £ . G • G • • id • c c 


id • >i <d G • • <d»»» 


• a) • t-2 id • • > £ id < id < co • fa id id • 


« m <d w o • fa X o, • 


OfcEH0)fa£»0)£ • O »"5 


o) • a • en 


O HO . < O G • g • G >ifa >i • • 


faXJgl-3«4JXS faWCH 
4JO W^4J4J -rHHIH 


-p-POiOicfaww cwo>»-3<d£a)<D d^ouc 


X (0 -H 10 fl) Id Id >i 0) <d X! -H XJMXJrHM Id 


W 0) IT G <D0>MMOG(d0) 


tP>H,flL|Cgg^^gftCHCftlW+J*<HHHg 
•HH.HU^OOC^OftliJHXfll'H-H^lHSaC 


0)G^id^XtG0)0)G ttG G 


gCG-HMHGXt4Jidfl)00 


MidG-H (dOGGOidG4->o-H04J<D(Da;a)(d(dO 


<d0)OMld-HQ)O0)^4J-H-H 


5wa*SrlbHHWrlHWb5bwb«ObftOiS!bp1gfflSO««ftfcioSS 


G 


G 
0) id G 


0) O >i 


0) g 0) w 


CMC W 73 


> G «W GrH 


0) O 0) Id N G M 


H -H <W U Id 


G <W^iH+J Id >i 3 


C X! O 35 


O O «WOrHQ)-H'OX5a)^OG 


- 0) as a 


G C fc 0) ^HJOfllHHH oh o bid 


U M 3 id X! G 


o id <d *-i ^ dk-q j >icpo cb u) a) g w g 
(O'HH .qoou-p <d o o o> a id id fa <d o) d 


0) G +J .d <D -H >i W 0) 

h hi -h q -a <dO MidO) 


cehh a) ac o c 43 c «d a a g d £ xs a <d -p h a w w >i m £ h 


•H -H Mld-HO<d4JO£ COXJ-HM 4Jld o 


30) ^^ siiid xj-h 

ffl.G>iO WHO0)ffl»O4JW 

Sid-HQ)gdCG <d id ja 


^^SCUSS'dHtKilllrl (0 -P H Id 0) Pl^rl 


U CU (d Ofa XI £]lM0)Mllli0OO4l 


•h o> w g o w o w<d . p o <d xi •o'O -ho* hc-d 


W <D M <d G 0>gNfJQ0)G-HldfaW:J.*a>'O >i-H 


GHW W-HTJO^Sa 0) 0^4J 


OrHOldOrHMld-H £ Id rH N O O «P Vl <d fc 


id a) a) u < fa -h w w h 


<d^^owxiQ)<i)-HrHW(dMH-HQ)Mr^p<w<d^a)rH<dM«a) v< w <d a-n a) 


Q) Id H Xl <d 0>rH fa Q) N fa-H H »0 0) M XJ 


0) G 0) G>0)(DGCUgOG 


CQ 0) XJ XI -H .C 0) «H g -H £WOX!Q>0)<dO>ldP 


0)UGO4J(DGgid <D fa O 


MOOGOOrJ -HQJidrHQ) OaGUMOMid 


M-Hao)idr-i04(d>i<dS -h 


o> o Old -h ^HbwoiidOO-Ho-d d u fa s 


•H^»>idx:<i)£id H -h o) u p m fa c w c 


+J C P V H u 


H (0 fl)h4JH TjCQ)C(dHH-H>iW(l) n) A) Id >)V) IS 111 l! >)>< 10 hh C Old 


(d>M IdOGGO-HldMO'OWrH-HXSldXBWrH 


Q)-H-H(drH -H Q) a) <d 3 M id 


*JrH'0GC0X}«dMC-H3rH<dW-HM4JCQ)0W-H 


g > Ur-\-Hri M+J4J g g'HrH 


ididCOO-HOgididMididMOgxJidGrHxJidfi 

55W<bhS5h3<!QDQgUfflbWO«<:<tHOW 


idQ>X2>ig-H.GQ)0)id<d0)>i 



«\OMoa\ONn^oooM^nn^^hhOHHinmeoeo^^^oiflvo(0eo^oo 

HHHHHHNINNINNIMINnn HHlNNMNINNfOin 



XSXSXSXJXJXjXJXiXiXiXiXSXJXSXJXJXJXJXiXSrHrHrHHHHrHrHrHfHrHHrHHHrH 
O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O -r4 -r* >ri t4 >r4 -r4 -,4 -ri -rl 'r* -r4 -r4 -r4 t4 -rt 't4 

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu 
ididididididididididididididididididididP^o^OHO^o^o^P^P^o^o^o^o^o^p^p^p^ 

££££££££££££££££££££<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 



144 



id 



u 



£ < 



ro 
>i 

id *h 

g-H 

< CQ -M 

4J CQ 

• (0 »rj 

W 4J «H 

2 O 

O 

H • 

w o 

&* 

O +J 
0) 

C Q CO 

id 

SI 

id id 



13-H 



•0 

id 

u 

•H 

fa b ft fa co ^ 



•H h 
C rH Q) 
43 -HA 

0^0 



•H-H 

CHH 

•HHO 

>iT3 

Xl-H 

fa CO 

c u 

(d <d 

^ £ 
i 

-a c 

c c 

(d < 

< c 
(d 

o • 

•h a 



CQ 
0) 

a a) 



<D 
13 <d 

a) -h 

fa cq 



0) 

>H 3 

O O 

c fa 

c * 

o o 
u 

• 

a> a) 

•H Q) 
H H 
CO H 

ss 

•o-o 

c c 
<d (d 



£ id 

O H 



rH Xl O 

•H ^| U 

M 3 CQ 
(OCA 

< <d Eh • 

<d ho 

S 'idC 

Q Q 0) 



c (d 
o a 

a) c 
* id 

U • 

Cb 
id 

H 

• 0) 

faXl 

w o 

<d -p 



< c 



<d o) 

•H H 

c 3 
•h « 

tt£ 

w 

•H13 

>§ 

13 
c J 

id < 

• CO 
2 0) 



c 
u o 

ssr 

Id rH Id 

fa <D fa 

c 

• c 

h> o 

cj 



0) 

8 a 



01 4J 



PQ 



3 <d 3 fc 

id X! O XI 



Eh 5 fa CJ Q 



c id 

0) M 

^ <d 

3 CO 
hJ 13 

c 

U id 

c 

id • 
s 



otjh 

CP-H ^ 

a) > id 

u a xj 

O Q U 



c 

>i-H 

u p. 
c id 
id « 

73 C 
C id 

id 



• w 

£ p 

c a id 

o «d u* 
b fa w 











T3 


>-i 


u 


u 





6 




•0 


>i 


,Q 


c 








10 0) 


<D 


0) £ 


c co 


r 


H4J 


g 


•H 


c 






kfflC 




c 




id 


Jh 


3 


0) 


id 


0) 




«d 


U 


n 


• 





<D 


^ 


rl 


id 


-P 


&»iH 




6 Q)-h id 


W 


Q) «H 




09 


M 


<D 




O-H CJ s 






•H 




CPr^ 


<D 


e 


O £ 




^rH 






<D 


c 


3 


c 


N 


O-H 


•H £ 







CO id 


c 


>iC 


4) 


3 


0) 4- 


M 


0) 




•H IM 


A 


9 


M-H H 


rH 


•H 




id 


5 


» 


X<* 


C-P 


Id 4J H 




rH fa 


• 


£ 




< 




id 


SI 




£ 


10 fa 


e » 




£ 




•H 




•h a 


c 




•H 




id 




0) 




id 


>i 0) 






& 


C 


^ 


c 


•H 


•H 


c 


C 


c 


u 


(4 




C 


>1(D 


0) £ 


id 


M 


M 


c 


0) 


c 


id 


M 


id 


id »o la 


5 


14 U 


CO 


•H 


H 


<d 


14 





u 


<tf ^ 


w 


C-H 


id 




3 £ 


4) 


a 


<d c 




£ 


3 


3 


a) c 


(d « T3 W 




X! 


« 




13 c/j 


<d w : 




c 




•O CO 






T5 


c 




fa 




Q 




T3 


id v 


c 




•0 V 


C 


<d *c 




T3 TS 


T3 


C 




c 


id ^ 


c 


c 


id 




c-o 


c 


C -0 


C 


id 


• 


id 




C 


id 


id 




• 


id 


c 


id 


id c 


«d 




£ 




• 


id 






• 


« 




<d 




<d 




• 




t 


h 




• 


• 


n 




• 




• 


• 


• 


fa XI 




i 


< u 




*0 fa 


• 


o fa 


X 




id 




c M 






T3 


M 




u 




h> 




w 


•HT3 


Q) 




•0 


0) 


C 


id 


u 




& 


X* 





id 


gHj 


>i-H 


CT 


£ 


0) H 


-* X-* 


e 


0) 


id 


a^ 


e 


M 


R 


U 4- 


3 


M 


id ^ 


>-l 





M 


c 


0) 


s 








•H 


0) 


id 


id 


^ id 


<d 


g 


a) 


O 4-> 


n3 


a 


0) 


id 


« fa CW ffl CJ SE S 


b « w OS 


O OS 



i 

u 

4J 

CO Q) 

T3 > 

C O 

3 Q 

»d r4 

c id 

O X! 

c 

C <D 

0) XSrH 

> a o 

0) 0) u 
4-> 4J Id 
W CO CJ 



c 
id 

•H 

u 
id 

CQ XI 
X! CQ 
4J O 

u 

04J 

I s 

< CQ 

id 
an 
•h o 

rH X! 
•H U 
XJ-H 

fa 2 



0) 
■P X! 

c u 
id o 

XJ fa >i 

ftiid 

•H Q U 

h id 
o id a 

•H 
X! O C 

CP-H X! 
•H ^ O 

Q)4-> hJ 

J id 
fa >i 

X! C 

<d >i o 

CHX! 

CH4J 

id a) c 
x » < 



0) CQ 

c c c 
com 

O 4J T3 

UCH 

id o 

4J CJ 
CO 

XI 
Q) 4-> 

S5 

id 
<d n 

T3 rH 

c fa 
id 
x a) 

C7> 0) 4J 

Q) rH (d 

£ < « 



c 
o 

rl rl 

O rH CJ-H 

SO) 3 
VH-H Q) £ 



a) « 



^ c 
o <d 
a) a) 



*•? 

CQ rH 
•H Q) 
O C 
> C 

0) o 

X) Q 

0) 0) 

o 



<d 3 w a) 
>iX id 

fa Eh H rH 

O 0) 

Id id XI XJ 

co >i u u 

•H Id -H -H 

J 2 Z £ 



^S5 



&5 

id id 

fa « 



•P 

•P )H 

4J o 
o XI 

5 

co fa 



rl 

0) 

fi o 
^ 4-> 

<d id 

fa u 
u 

U 0) 

<d cj 

T3 0) 

fa C 

c 

0) 0) 
C-H 
C rH 
0) 3 
CQ h 



0) 

id id 

X! Q 

ox; 
id 0) 

NXi 

•h id 

rH N 

W-H 

H 

r-i fa 
0) 

xi id 
o c 

S5 



11 



0) o 

0) 4J Q) 
CO U 

c 
id 
a 
o 

04 O 

O CQ CP 

co Jh-h 
o 0) id 

1-3 4J rl 

^4J CJ 

? id 

a» fa 4-> 

X! C 
4J 0) id 
4J CQ >i 

id id ^ 

£ U CQ 



& « 

10 ^ 

IM-H CQ 

O 4-> 5 

^•H O 

MH M 

O OX) 

> a a) 
acj 



id >-i 
u a) 
^•h 

id c 
•h «d 



c 



c 
c 
id 

>iX 
CO CJ Q fa CO 



0) XI g 

CQ N-H rH 
■P4J g O 
4J-H CO O 

O fa 

fa 4J XJ 

0> U 4J 

C CO Q)-H 

-H O XI -o 

fa b 



>1 

CQ 

c 

id 

X! 


•H 



xj id 

a) c 
co id 

SI 



0) 

a 
co co 

i* 
§| 

CQ 4J 
4J 

>i id 

0) £ 

H C 

0) £13 
U C 
13 C id 

ecu 

< < CQ 



HojvoHHntinvovovovor^r^coHnvoH 

HHHCSNINCMNNCMCSNNNINn H 



^•ifivof^H^inifieoooocoon^vc 

HHHHNNNINNn HHHH 



a)Q)Q)Q)Q}a)a)a)a)a)Q)a)a)0)>i>i>i>i>i>< 

^^t^l^^^^^l^^^^^^S^C C C C C C C C C C C C CCHrHrHrHrHrH 

55i255i255i2i2 rtrtflflflfl ^^^- 1 - , - 5 3rJ33333c333333rJ 



145 



c 

Q) O 

S3 

o x 
*c 

•H 0) 
•H Q) 
(3 rH 
C7> rH 
•H O 

43 U 

< 
73 

73 C 

C rd 

id 

«!^ 
*g 

HP (0 
^l-H 
0) iH 
43 rH 
O-H 

0$ 5 



c* 
In 

43 

U -P 
0) Q) 
& 0) 

o) A3 a 

rH EH O 
ft H 

0) Q) 



EH rH C 

H C (0 
>i< 5>i43 
O J+J 
C 43 *h 

73 CO -H 73 

C Q C 

id 73 rd 

CO 

. fd c • 

fa id < 

73 H -rH 
U 0) 

idc (0 

.CS <d rH .c 
O-H 3 o 
•H Lj rd-H 

fa 03 fa £ 



■P 
•H 

% 

0) 

J* 

O 

0) p 

C CQ 

c w 
id 
n c 

3 Q) 
CO CU 
rH 
73 43 
C -P 
«J « 

.rO 

h> C 
o • 

•H fa 

>H 

0) 73 
-O-H 

0) > 

Jh <d 
fa Q 



o 

^ c 

>iQ) C-H 
H 43 rd -P 
H tP 0> Jh 

cy (d w <d 

CHG) 

o <d-H • 

a o *h £ 



c « £ 
<d w 

0) 0) 

b -p c 

<1)-H 

id c (d 

Cbw 



m" 73 TJ 

cc-d 

73 rd rd c 

c (d 

<d • • 

Q O 



J 0) rH 

C 0) 
C 0>-H 
43 0>C 

o 53 id 

H) W Q 



o 



w 

o) 73 

rH 0) H 

a) rH a) 

> O-H 

OU«H 

J c 

0) (d 

• c u 
•J c o 

<d 

>i cq c 
H30) 

rH CO 0) 

O >H 

as 73 53 

c (d 

•o id as 

rd U 73 
0) c 

• 43 <d 

o • 
cy hp b 

fc-H C 

O >h43 
fl) 43 O 

OUb 



c 
o 
4-> 

rH 

o 

H C 

H >, 

0) u 
N43 
N +J O 

53 id o 

OS « 

(d 

C >iCO 

o *h 
}h (d a) 
rd £-h 

43 U 
CO 73 <d 

C £ 

•o <d 

id • c 

< (d 

Q H • 
0) U 

■p <d 

-P 43 rH 

o o <d 

O-H <D 

CO £ 55 



(0 

O H 



CO 
•H 
G 

c c 



(3 

rd 

>ig 

cy n 



43 U 

O Q) U 



3 C <D 

o o cq 

73 rH fd 

u u u 

03 fa rH 

rH 
C Q)-H 
>iC b 

•53 >i 

0) T3 

c fd c 

id >h cy 

•h rd ^ 

a eh 

73 
73 73 C 

(3 C fd 
rd fd 

• 

* * CQ 
H W 

c 

rH rH fd 

id 53-h 

a) rd ^ 

55 fa CQ 









53 ^ 








>H rH rH 


O -P 








Q) 









Jh 


fd 





X O rH W rH 


rd c 


•H 






a^ 


>h £ 


53 O 


H 




43 


O H 


rd 




O 




53 > 


exu 


0^>i 


a) fd o 


c 




• C CJ 


•H 


h 


rd 


a) 


(3 


rH S 




0) 


• 


hH* rd 


O >i43 


c « 


+J «H 


^V 


• 


rH U 


CQ 2 CO 





53 SE 


CrH A 


ecu 


a) 




0) 53 




CO r-a 


•H 


0) 




< 0) 




5C 


fd 


•H CO 


• fd 




.& 


3 K 


C 


rH 


0) 




rH 


U 


J-H 


C 


a 




C 


• rH 


O 


cy 


•H 


H 


O 


5 


x id 




rd < 


•H 


c 


0) 


•n O H H 


£ 


rd 


U 






c 


C 43 


Jh U 


O U 




id 


T3 


53 


>i > 


5>iCO 


rd rd 


U 4-> 


fd 


CQ Id 


C 


fd 





uubhl 




s o 


rd rd 73 


♦H h 


•H £ 


fd 


c c 






73 




CJ (U 


c J 


h) 




Jh 


fd rd 73 73 


C 73 




•H 


55 




T3 Eh 


c 


c 


rd 


C C 73 73 ^ 73 


T3 


C 






fd 


fd 




rd rd 


C (3 




C 73 


C 


rd *0 






• 




rd rd 73 


id c 


id 




c 


c c 


• 


• 


Oh 


• • 




c 


id 




• 


<d 


rd rd £ 




CQ 03 


• • 


fd 




• 


o 










>i 




►4 O 




» • 


Cn 




• 


t • 


73 rQ 


Q) H H 




• 


£ 




4J C 


u 


U rH h cy 


cq as 


C 


H 






id 


rd 


U 


rd rd 


•H-H 




•H (Q 


rd 


0) * 


C C 43 


Q) 73 


rH rH 


G 


C 0) 


•H 45 


U 43 rd 


O 


O 


> 


C 


rH-H 43 


ss 


M 





rd 


O rH 


•H 


•H 


0) 


rd -h 


rd 43 





0Q«Sb<tftfpq«S53^h)Qb 



Q) rd 
n C 
4J rd 
d)-H c 

•H Q fd 
> >H 

CQ O 

U <D 5C 
Q) 6 

73 (d rH 

Cbfl) 
rd 53 
X u g 

a) cy fd 

rH X3 CO 

O 73 
W U 

u w fd 

CU-H 43 
43 ^ O 
O 43 -H 

a o a 



c 
o 

X 

•H 

£ 

CQ 

id u 
g cy 

O 53 

43 id 

Eh U 

03 

C 

Id rH 

■H 53 

U rd 

03 Cm 



rd o 

HP c 
CQ-H 

0) -H 
fa CO 

5>1«H 

C 0) 

o fd 

43 43 
HP O 
C-H 

< £ 

43 S 

a <y 
cy u 

CQ 73 

O c 



>H 

cy 

C7> 

cy 

•H 5>i53 
*43rH 
O 4J <W 
>i Jh Cm 
N rd 
U O Q) 
73 O C 

cy £-h 

HP 
4p IQ 

id u 

>i43 

u u 

03 

0) 
C rH 

rd O 
D> O 
O-H 
J 55 



03 



U X 

cy id 

CQ rH 

rd 53 

U M 

V 

C CQ 

o «d 



> en 

H M 

a) 

- 43 

cy cq c 

rH-H -H 

&>rH 0) 

Id C7>fa 

C C 
<W H C 

53 OH 
S3 gnP 
id U 
43 -H O 

Q4.H 55 

CQ -H CQ 

O 2 rd 

b rH fa 

73 O 
C-H £ rd 
43 > O >H 

o «d -h id 

b Q 55 CO 



43 
■P 
•H O 



cy 

>1>irH 

c cy 4J 53 

rd w 43 o 

g <d o>co 
cq >iO id 

cq cy u CQ 

o h 43 cy 53 

U X -P O HP 

o c o 

•H 43 
5>iK id 
CT> N 

0>rH -H 
Cy 53 rH 

fa rd W M 

fa 



5 

rX 43 

O O 

0) Jh 

C >i03 53 

0) 43 HJ 

73 -P 43 CO 
73 rH HP 



CQ 
C 53 
rd 0> 

CJ r4j 



rH 

>i >i-h rd 

rH C rH U 43 
•H Id -H Jp O 

g cy g <d <d 
w co w fa n 



>1>H 
M 73 

rd C 

£ < 



43 rH 

rd O 
n U 
•H Jh 

h fd 
w u 

>i rd 
O 43 
C -P 
HJ C 

u id 

53 g 

o id 



73 rd 

U rH 

id h 

c cy 

rH rH 

rd O 

03 U 

Jh O 

cy Li 

o id 

c c 

c 

cu cy 

co o 



c 

rd 

E C >i53 

cy <d cy o 

CQ g C rH 

CQ 53 O O 

Id 43 H O 

£ co id £ 

£ 

cy 5*1 * 

O rH ^ O 
•H -H O -H 



g c 

rd o 

•H L| 

rH cy 

rH g 

•h rd 

u co 03 5 a 



1 



rH 

rH -P 

4J rd 
C id fa 

O fa 

CQ C 
5>iC fd 
H fd-H 

r-\ rH J>1 U 

H < « 03 



C 

S 
§5 

CO O 

53 
>i03 

® - 
H C 

CQ H 

^-H 

rd £ 
C O 
•h id 
4J£ 
w - 

•H C 

M43 
43 O 



vovoofovoHrxo\nn^jnt^nninvooHvovor^cofNr>c3>o<Nin^ , '*'5t , cr»^ , o 

H rl CM CM N H N (N (N IN HHHHHrH(N<N(Nfn HHHfN H 



^^^^kkr4r4rlh^r4r<rl 

cycucycDQJcycucycycycDCDcucy 



u u 



434)434343i34343434343434343rHrHrHrHrHrHCUCy 

4JHp-PHPHP4JHP4Jggggggggggggggcycycycycycy4343 

CQCQCQCQCQCQCQC0<ycy<UCU<y(UCUQ)CUa)CU<l)Q)CU434343434343gg 
5>i5>i5>i>i5>i5i535l5353535353HJHJ-PHJ4JHJ4J.p4J4JHJ-PHJH->OOOOOOCyQ) 

53535353535353^5353535353<ycU<y<yQ)cy<l)a)cyQ)<l}(l)<U<l)UOOOOOOO 

bbbbb<#<<<;rt;i<*s;<cocococococococococococococooooooo5555 



146 



Q) 
4J »d 



o> c 
c id 



A fa 

O 73 

:* 

CO 
(0 c 

Id 

w • 

•o 

fa w 

(0 <d 

X! 6 

o o 

•H X! 
OS H 



C 
(0 

cxs 

(0 id 

II 

0) ^ 

c o 
'*>-{ 

•H fa 

3 -P 

id id 

A 04 

XJ fa 
O 73 

S5 



* c 
id id 

fa O -H 

O M 

0) >i 0) 

fa o c 

•O t-3 Q) <d 

fa >+J 

•H Id O W 

owao 

Q 0) U 

fa a) 

ex: a c 

Q O 

• 73 q 

<d C 73 

fa me 

0) • id 
XJ fa . 
a w • 
OB ha 
•P <d 4J 

W'H fa fa 

•H r-l <D O 

farH XI O^ 

XS-H O O 

CJ 3 OS « 



0> 

c 

fa >1 
<d o> fa 

C X! fa 
•H fa 0) fa 

4JOCQD 
W S5 «H 
•H Q) Q) 

x: o>-h c 

CJ ld-P 5 
X! C 

<D U 11 4) 
>-HH> 

•H > 

> u c 

<D 0) c <0 
C -P Id cr 
0) 0) > 0) 

e> cu w s 



CO 
0) 
0> 



uu 

LL 

o 

UJ 

m 



SS o 



Q 

UJ 

Q 
CC 

o 
o 



w 

< 

£ 

CC 

< 

2 



h> H 



c 
o 
4-> 

DO 
0> 

fa 3 
04 X) 

X 

• o 

ha OS 

>i4J 
U W 

C fl) 

(d 5 
*c 



c 

0) 
fa fa 

CQ 



fa 73 

o 
W o 

o o 

xj 2 



fa C Q 

u 

g OX! g 

<d xi -p <d 

•H fa 0> .C 

r-l fl) C 73 

rH .c c a> 

•H W 0> Q 

c c 

H H 



fa 0) 

•H 

W <H 

0) 73 

<d £ 
b c 



T3 

o 

0) 

fa <W 
0) 73 

X} 0) 

"c 



73 

o 

I 

JS 

4J-H 
fa 1-1 
Q) 73 

X) 0) 



>1 

O) 

o 
fa 
u 

73 

. rH 

ha 0) 

•H 

C <u 

•H73 
> 0) 

*C 



0) 

o 

u 
o 



rH . rH J 



ha 0) 

•H 

C <H 

c 



4-» O C 

fa P tf 

0) W X! 

X! O P 

O CQ id 

OS % 

c 



Z 55 



C C737373737373737373 
•H -H «H -H «H -H -H -H «H 
<DQ)(1)(1)Q)<D<])Q)Q) 



<d id 

fa fa 



* 73 73 73 *0 

Id rH H H H 

4J 4) 0) 0) 0) 

C -H -H -H -H 

O U U <W <W 

fl) *0 73 73 73 

C 0) <D 0) 0) 

O S S £ £ 



Z 2 



o o 

u u 

Q) 0) 
O O 
•H -H 



73 

rH73 

0> ^ 
•H O 

73 73 

£ CQ 



0) 

J 

O « 

O 04 

o 

o c 
id 

• •H 

« -P 

w 

C-H 
0) ^4 

u & 

5° 



o 

id 

c «d «d 

0) N g 
0) X3 

h • w 

fa O • 

id u 

u <D id 
id 73 P 
XJ fl) 73 
hkC 
id fa id 
cq w 



c 
o 

0) 73 

C 3 

73 X 
U 

id • 

u ^ 

>iC 

o xi 
id o 

£^ 



c c 
^00 
•H w to 

0) ^ S-l 
J-l 0) 0) 
P 73 73 

SS5 



w o 

0) 73 
C-H 
C > 

o id 

> Q 



M J 



id c 

73 >i 0) 0» 

04JX^ 
O >il?0 



0) 

C >i 0> 



^1 rH ^| 
U-H 0) 

Q) g-H 

04 CO 04 



c 
o 

>i w 
P c 



OS 0) 

o 
id 

0) 

g-H 

id Z 

Oi 



* £ 

id b a 

j-i a) id 

<d 4-> C g 

X) J-l-H O 

>h-h «d A 

id « «H Fri 
CQ fa 



b fa b < 



3 fa 



Id 73 XJ 

JP rH Id 

u id Jh 

0) c o 
XI OXl 

O OS 0) 

OS Q 



* U ' 

O d) fa 

•H <IH 

>H-H O 
4J C-H 

id c M 

04 0) fa 



^ONIACOOH 




H 


ON 


** 


o 


1** 


** 


m 


vo 


r>j 


CJ 


cs 


NNNnn 








H 


CM 


H 


r>j 


H 


H 


CN 


cs 


H 


J-l M J-l J^ ^ ^ 








>i 


>i 
















0) 0) 0) 0) 0) 0) 




>i 


>i 


fa 


fa 
















iilfii 




fa 

id 


fa 

id 


id 

3 


id 

3 


•H 


>-i 












0) CD 0) 0) 0) 0) 


fa 


3 


3 


fa 


fa 


•H 


•H 










0) 





EH 


c 


c 


X) 


X) 


fa 


fa 


>i 


>i 


>. 


>1 


c 


0) 0) CD 0) <D <U 


< 


id 


id 


0) 





a 


a 


id 


id 


id 


id 


3 


Q Q Q Q Q Q 


o 


h> 


h> 


fa 


fa 


< 


3 


£ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


ha 



147 





id 




C Ll 

fl) 

01 H 


C 
id 




C C C 
id Li id cu id 


c 


u 




Ll U 

a) m 


ti 




1*1 * • fa 

&» w b> p 04 b» 


id 


0) 




a • a) 


ff 04 




g 


r-\ 




S Li -P -P 


L| 




Ll -H Li 01 D 


& 


u 




b* b io to 


0) h> 




fl)Cfl)04fl)^bfl) 
•H >H rH • -H O H 


Q> 






H -H 0) &4 +j 


H 




u 


«. 




Q) C -H .01 


o 




uaco^M-H *o 


fl) 


• 




»H C -H Ll b fl) 







04 Ll O 


#H 


u 




O fl) £ Oi -H 


01 




* +J 01 


O 


h> 




^ «H * 01 04 


Li 




0)73010) id 3 01 
LiLiLi3>iQ4LiLi 


* 


^ 




C 3 H >t u 


o id 




Q)idQ)Xjfl)Nldfl) 
73XS73<dHpO'd 


-0 


>1 




0) 2 £ q) Q) 


,H u 




o 


XJ 




73 .* C <W G 


X) 




C O C C * -H c 





3 




•h id id o <w M 


•H 




id -h id o o Cm «j 


3: 


^ 




o £ m xs a) a) 

K C id b XJ 


2 b 




H OJ rH Q Ll &4 H 

fa 4J fa O • fc, 


73 • 


• 


T3 


• 73 <I) 73 


0)«73 «73 73SS73Q)73 


Hhiew 


iH 


• K UP Ll fl) g 


OJH +J rH 


• A< £ rH •QfaH • iH H p iH . 


0) id 




a) cq w (0 w • id c id • 


Q) -P 


q> £ O 0)S*H Q) ^ 0)73 0)P fl) £ 


•H -P £ 

<w l« 73 


to 


•H 


•H 73 -H 73 -H < g C XJ b Ll 01 -H <D 


•H 


2 VI-* O «P -H -H Ll -H fl) -H 


id <w 


Id H Ll H H H r-lldtP 


0) id <W 73 <W 73 P fd<M73 a Li u c «w id <W 73 <w 73 


•0 0) fl) 


g«OrHHldHldrH^«HCCC 


> g73 3 73 


•H C g-d-HH fl)73-H73x573 373-H 

>idOfl)>idAfl)>Q)Ufl)idQ)> 


Q) A 0) 





(1) 


•H -H £ -H C Ll X3 Id -H XJ 


o o o) id 


Q) 


se o ssx 


Q) £ O £ O K id V 0) K a 


id%Xi£id^p£fl)£-H£H£id 


tf 


H 




^ a a £ b b 


H U 




QHQOIMOIUQ 


c c 




c 


c c c ■ c c 


C C 


C 


C C C C C C C 


H H 




H 


H H H H H 


H H 


H 


H H H H H H H 

• 


• • 






id id 


a a 




• 


X X 






•h 73 


o o 




Q 


S3 a 






oi id 
01 c 
3 73 C id 


73*73 




fl) fl) C 

•H iH OOO 


«. «k 


73 73 


ceiH'd'd'dou -o 


C C 


73737373ldid7373 737373MJ4734J 


dJdlgH 


•H Q) rH rH rH -p C iH g 


id id 


rHHi-IH7373r-IH HHHOOHdi 


•0 73 id 


a> 


(DH^-HflH)J)waO0)idHH!IHIl 


fl) 


Q)Q)fl)Cc:Q)Q)>iQ)fl)Q)X)X)Q)C 


01 01 73 


•H 


•H ^ O <W -H -H -H -H 04 -P -H XJ 


O 0) -H -H 


•H 


.r+ .ri *r4 *r4 -ri -rt '* O -H *H -H fl) Q) «H «H 


<W <H 


C O 01 U U U rH C«WtP>>HH<WlH<W<WHH<H<WC'W<«'HHH<W ) C 


>i>i 0) -0 73 


IdOlC'O'd'drHOS'OC 


Q) 0)rHiH73737373 01 C07373-H7373734J-P73 0J 


id id fl) 


a) 


0) 


Li O Id 0) Q) fl) O Q Id 0) -H 


•H r-i ••-» «H 


0) 


a)fl)Q)oofl)a)dfl)0)fl)4J4Jfl)id 


fflWS5SSfeSSS2SXQ^£auUggS:!S£2«(ii2S:oi£££4!<:SS 








01 


• 
L| 




Li Li (Q 








•P 


>i 




W fl) *-H 


u 






0) G U -P 


Q) C 0) Ll 




•H »H ^ >«_ 


fl) 






> O b 0) LlrH O 0>fl) 




rH C fl) fl) X! C 


CCA 






O G XJ XS C <D 73 01 c c 

3 oidP- ^ ae-Pidi 




oi 0) -Hoiflj a O 


•H >,0 






C 


^ m u P oix: u^+)c 


H N 0) 


>1 




N&CWg-H>,C(d^g 


id Li H 3 





fl) Ll H Id 3fl)O4Jfl)30)Q) 


o) fc-H xi 




C-H0)-PUgidQ)Oi0)id4JO4JCQ 


01 


Lifl)X5idO Of-|.H73^£)VlrHLl 


> trfa 


fl 




SrHTSSfiWLiLlg^iJWXlW 


C73X!fl)fl)-H3«XigrHrH «J HO 


<u a) 


ij 




«o«hc uxsido) 


O 


XJ 


COLiXi>0 1W0*.S«C4J 

5-H4JW073»3idi^i^ 3 

4JW £Xj04EHOcl . • •< 


Q 5 . 




01 


g O « • • t^xJ 2 • 


<D 01 • b 





< 


• 


rH 


. w a <b ou b 


O h) 


h> 


• • 


£ H r : 


C • 73 




. w fl) 22 «d • fl) u £ 


h> u u 




•H 


• • 0) H >i iJ • < 01 


•H U Li Ll 


• 


Q . -H • 73 • • w O C • .i 


fl) 


w 5 


COh)H QIH4J OS Id 


Li 0) O £ 


• S Li W • H < fa -H 01 fl) O 


id 73 <w 


id 




•H U Id Lj Ll 0) >irH 04 73 <W <W 




■P£ id £ id • fl) Li id c 


•0 -H-H 


g 


C -P ■■•' • 


•H-H <w 


idP 


c > c 





s 


licx:xjuxjx)73LiLi^ 


0) > C-H 


c 


OCLlfl)XJfl)OOx: >iJ3 O Id -H 

o5idcoc-H<doeid-Pxs-HLi 


•H Id C XS 


ClflCH 


c 


JQ (DEh 


OSH^H g .H«.H* 5 Q 


C Q 0) U 



Q 



<N 


0> 


VO 


VO 


o 


o 


r^ 


t^ 


H 


H 


•^r 


*• 


in 


H 


H 


00 


in 


in 


H 


H 


CM 


CM 


H 


H 


H 


H 


CO 


H 
0) 


H 

-P 

0) 


H 
0) 


H 
(0 


CM 

01 


CM 


CM 
10 


u 


Ll 

1 

fl) 


fl) 
C 


fl) 
B 


fl) 

c 


fl) 

c 


>1 

rH 




•H 


H 


>1 
H 


& 


& 


g. 


& 


& 


& 


g. 


I 


4J 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


s 


fl) 


0) 


h) 


b 


b 


b 


h> 


^ 


h> 


^ 


b 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 


<< 


< 


0) 


en 



148 



























H 












c 






4J 












c 

















c 
















(0 AJ 






• 






g 






P 




4J 




•p 


(d 










£ 






0) (0 






0, 












0) 




(A 




(0 


i 










>i 






•H Q) 






• 






5^ 


c 




0> 









•H 






4-> 




Q^ 


C 




U -H 






ra 






Ql 


id 




•H 




•H 




c 






W 




u 


id 




fa rl 


4-» 








•P 


M 


E 




rl 




M 




•H 


u 






0) 




Q) 


g 




fa 


CO 




fc 




(0 


0) 


^, 




fa 




fa 




s 


0) 






•H 




rH 


R 




% 


Q) 




c 




0) 


•H 


C7* 














rH 






h 




O 


fr 




• * 


•H 









•H 


o 


U 




» 




v 




• 


O 


-P 




01 






rl 




U 0) 


U 




w 




rl 




<D 




rl 




rl 




rl 




(A 








« 


0) 




•-) rH 


01 




c 




04 


« 


rH 




0) 




<D 




CO 


h 


0) 




* 




c 


rH 




rH 






•H 






00 


u 




£ 




X! 









•H 




W 







U 




^ -H 


k 




49 




« 


M 






0) 









% 


J* 


rl 




•H 




(0 






>i > 


>1 









>1 


0) 


« 




rH 




r-< 




>1 


10 


ft* 




-P 




rl 


<* 




73 Q> 


0> 




X 







73 


73 




rH 




r-\ 




u 


•H 






•H 




Q) 


73 




73 C 


rH 








H 


c 


O 




0) 




CD 




u 


c 


fe 




<d 




73 


O 




3 tPC 







w 




•H 


id 


O 




U5 




« 




3 


«d 


e 




CO 




S 


O 




U rl O 


fa 




0) 




(0 


H 


s 










6 


ra 


<d 




3 




s* 




3 CO 




>« e 




OQ 


fa 






• 




• 


<d 


c 




0) 




rJ -P 








• 49 


• 


0) 


<d 


c 


•o 


73 


• 




h> 




h) 43 


• 


••O Q 


c & 


0) 


•73 


• 


73 fa 


O H 


n 


• iH 


•«H J 


0) 




0) 




0*09 4-> ra rH 




•H 




44 ffl 


C 


fiW 


c 


to 




5 


&0£ 




rH 


>iH 


>iC 


to 


a) 


• 


rH 


• 





0) 




<d 


6 id 


(0 


<u 


w 


•H 


•H4J 


O 43 


O JC 


•H +J -H 


Q)-H Eh 


S 


fa 


3 73 


4J 


rH 


Id-HH 


-P Id rH 


•H 


u 73 <*h 73 <w 


U 


a-P 


a+J 


6 


rl H 


g <*H 






4-» 


r< <U 


rl 4< 


•H rH Q) 


HgH 


c 


Q> 


•H »C -H »0 


Q) rH 


rH 





(0 


Q) rH 


o 73 


c 


id 


c 


C 


id 73 


0) 


OHHC 


•H 


<D 


C £ 


> 0) 


> 0) 49 


<d 


g 


d 


g 


M 43 O 


U 43 


H43 


id 


5 0) 42 


O H-H O 


£435 


0) CO 


id £ 


<d 2 


S * 


•H5 


•H fa 


o a 


0) £ 


fa 


o 5573 s 


O « 


*-J *"3 


EH 




Q 




Q 


Q 


fa 




Eh 




Eh 




a 


ra 


r3 




ra 




fa 


« 




£ r9 


C 


c 




c 


e 


C 




c 




c 




C 


e 


c 




c 




c 


C 




c 


C 


H 


H 




H 


H 


H 




H 




H 




H 


H 


H 




H 




H 


H 




H 


H 



73 73 

H >irH 

0) rl 0) 

•H 3-H 
<*H 43 «*H 

73 X73 
0) O 0) 

£££ 



C S5 id 

73 *C *0 13 O 13 73 'O 73 43 73 73 73 
HHHH4JHHH >«rH ^ &>H rH rH 
D(D0)0)5MDfl)3)ri<y>iCQ)>i(U(D 
■H -H -H -H C -H -H -H 3 -H <D -H -H (d -H -H 
(M<M-H<4H<H<IH43<1H (/) 6<4H ^<M<r4 
T373rH'07373 X73 fi (d73737373 



<U (4-1 
73 73 

o a) 



SSi!SSS§SS£SSSS 



J-173 0)737373 673737373 

O r-\ &r4 rH rH «J CHHH 

43 0) 73 0) 0) 0) 43 id 0) 0) 0) 

Hi -H -H -H -H -H 4J rH -H -H -H 

CT><*H J-| <M «W <W C ^ <*H <rl <H 

C7343737373 0) 0737373 

^S ££££& 2 ££& 



fl)CP 
73 id <w 

rl g Id 

0) 
K • fa 
fa 

id 

•H43 b 

u a 

•H 0) C 

u w id 

4J O W 

id »d S 

fa CO 



c w o 

•H W 4-> 

0) 0) 4-> 

4J Eh (d 

U K 

£* J 

Q < 

fa 0) 

U 44 

73 -H U 

0) C id 

S5 id S 



(0 43 
73 4J 
rH-H ^3 
O S4J S 

>iCW-H o 

a) >i g h 

H Q) . CO H 

o fa co id 

• 09 

a c • 

w < 
<D 

O rH (d 

&r4 r< 
«d o 

U 43 49 

id u a) 

ra Q 



£4JrH 



>i 4-> 

43 0) 

CU 49 

U 10 

SrliS 

u 

. id • 

^ 09 CO 



id s a) u 



H id 73 

»h }-i <d 

•HJll 

£C id 09 

M 



4J C 
«W 43 

u ^ 

0) r4 

eh a 

• • 

so 

c id 

•HT3 

> C 

o) a> 

H r4 

09 



0) 
H Q) 

«^ 

•H 

a eh 



73 U 

rl 

id id 

r«73 

73 C 
W-H 

r9 



>i43 
43 (0 
4J H 
r4 (d 

3 s 

o • 

3 «d 
id g 
fa id 

CO 



0) 

r4 (0 

43 C 

CD.0 

id g w 

c^3 fc 

id sc <d 

13 fa • 

>1 r9 

• id (0 
-j r9 id id 

O rH U 

O S CT>73 
H 3 C 
rH c o id 
a 5 Q 43 



(0 
Q) rH 

crw 
u c 
id c 
ra O 
Q 

• o 

ss 

0) c 
tr fl) 

r< 0) 

O )H 

0) 3 

O id 

s 



c 
>iid co 

rH tPfc 
rH Id O 

0) c 

c fa c 
c o 
o c u 

U-H 

rl • 

• W CO 

fa 

r4rH 

43 0) 0) 

a<M id 

0) *H 43 
10 c u 
O C-H 
ra a) a 

*"3 



CN 


fN 


rj 


cn 


V0 


r^ 


n 


n 


CO 


e> 


n 


^* 


H 








H 


H 


CM 


CM 


OJ 


OJ 


CM 


CM 


r4 
























I 


r4 


U 


H 


rl 


rl 


U 


U 


U 


rl 


U 


u 


1 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


49 


49 


49 


49 


49 


49 


49 


49 


43 


43 


49 


4-> 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


a 


■P 


4-> 


4J 


•P 


4-> 


4J 


4-> 


•P 


•P 


4J 


4J 


0) 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


U 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


CO 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 



SO 


o 


H 




CM 


H 


rl 


rl 


rl 


g 


0) 

1 


0) 
49 

g 


0) 


0) 


0) 


> 


> 











0) 


2 


2 


Q 



149 



CO 
CO 
0> 



Q 

-I 

LU 

iZ 
Q 

UJ 

2 



Q 

cc 

o 
o 

UJ 

cc 

(0 

X 
I- 

< 
UJ 

Q 







5 
3 
































Q) 










c en 






5 










0) 
•H -H > -P B* 




a) 








Q) 




■P 4J fl»-H tt fi 0) 




M 


IM 






J-l 




U iJ 0) -H Ui 




3 









3 




U U 3 43«3-P 3 




r-i 








rH 




(d (UHOIU 0) WH 




•H 


id 






•H 




<M <W -H J3 0) 0) *H 




id 


w 6 






id 




Cld C «JP (DH Mfd 




fa 


•H O 






fa 




H-rO,Hfe X! CQ fcfa 
C 10 *W JJ rfj 






u m c 




id 








•p 


0) 0-H 




J3P 




HOHHJJO H ^ 




u 


43 







M 




<o B id «d b oid>iid 

■H3fc-H*IIJJJCkH 




<d 


C 1 ^ -P 


C 


id 4J 


w 


a) 


id o id 


(0 


•H 


Q) 


to »d a) tj Q) -h -h id 3 


CO 


K u 


<1> 


o a 


0) 


UGUUtCVitO^GO 


D 




43 


n 


h 




b 


<d a. <d id oiuo-H 
o a)oa)+j3<Dg}-i 


< 


Q) 


OHO 


14 


<d 


Q) 


fc 


o 


> 


•H -H < CJ 


> < 


OHH > id id -M »H 4-> 




•H p >«P 






•H 




>i id o >i-h e m G 3 c 




•P 


id u id 





C4J 


US 




W 


Q) <d -P 


id 


<d 


(0 


<d 


43 C 10 C > 




Q) 


U G W 


•H 


•H 


Q) 


•H 


ooidoo -hjj^-h 




0> 


h 


tPT3 4J| 




C 


C ^ -P 


n 


id 


G 


M 


3oa3cn3ton<w 







id Q) 


id 


> 





id 


0M300<drH(d«dQ) 




UfcUSUOUU<B3W<UU(0OUJ 



c 








id 











a 


•H 








C 


•P 








c 


id 


g§ 






r-l-H 


to 






O 


(0 


04J 






CJ V4 


0) 


C 






id 


u 


•H Q) 






<W u 




& 










(0 M 


h 




M 





id <w 




3 


fc-H 


0) 







H 


0) c 


U -P 


c 




•H 


O 


4J n id 


0) 10 




id 


W CHlO 


4J-H 




fa 


•h id o b 


a) *h 


< w 




id 


touuo 


id n k io 
•h < o a) 







•H r-l 


c 


-P 




e «d +. 


id -h id 


id 


U G 


Id'H-H o 


6 -p « 

43 Id 


•H4J e 


•H 


<u <u g p -p ^ 


c id o 


C43 « 


o id id id 


•P id u 


4J C 


O -P 


G -P P U 


3 id o 


1 


^ <D-H w w 


43 73 a»o 


0) 4J 


o id id o> 


U U w n 
C «d a) «d 


a) -p m 


a) 


&§ 


J-i -P P c 


c a) id 


c 


id 0) Q) 3 


faEOfaK^USSSd 






VOCO<NVOHOH^»\Ot^H«ninvOOI^fM^I'0»n^'CO 

oot^covooot^t^coo\o>r»oocr\voino\oooooovoo^q\coinvoncor*voM5voco 



<«ONnomco^inm 



W 



c 

id o u u 

•h a^ u u <D 0) 

O 0) d>0) CP43 ^ 

•Hnoid^ww^ 

CH«Hi-| O O-H O 
O G fe -H O fo OQ 
+J • O tf 

SO 4J • • • • 

c a . w^o 

Q43 * .p C id 4J 
4J Q ^ SO-n^ 
0) O 0) U-H-H 0) 
U)V4043C^(M43 
OOCT>OQ)idOO 




C 

•a a 



0) 
id-H-H o 

4J n c <d 



G. Di 
• Sani 
. Tub: 
. Moyi 

E. J. 


William 
Harry S 
James F 
James T 
Blanche 



^•tooo^nt^eoHrot^oxNtoovooniocovoeocykr^t^cniovocNn 



r*> oo 0> 



^ M V4 V4 V4 n 

id id id id id id 

c c c c c c 

id id id id id id 

hi h> h> ^ hi H> 



>»>i>i >i >i J-i n J-i MM 
kkk&kididididid 
<didididid3333 



id id id 
3 3 3 3434343434343HiH»H 
33333^nnM^MUinOOOOOO-H.H.H w 
GGGGGjQAAXiAAA£lUUUUUUUUU>i 

idididididojcjojojojojojojididididididOiacbid 






150 



4J 








0) 0) 




>1 




i n 




43 P 




3-P H 




a c w c 




£ c< 




CO O 0) 


•p 


o> <d 




< -H p -H 


(0 


fl) ©TJ >i6 


<D Q) 


v o) a a) p -p 

P P P < >, 0) 


0) 


P H -H P 


CO (0 


p. 


3-H004J 


id id 


4J^33 >i 3 P CO 


a 


HAU4JIA 


co o> o> 


a> <diHiHjs h >, id e id 


•H O < * «J 


id co w 


g 0)<M-H-H4J -H M W 5) O f0 




(d 6 P H Q) 


Q) -H «H 


o s c id id id id <d c-h co -h 


>1 


En P -H XI &» M 


io a a 


^TSHfeCnaSfaCHO-H c 


P 


p 10 0*0 id d 


•H 


»d o co o-hq»oo 


M O 


M < ^ 0) S ^ -H 


O P P 


C(0H4J^H-H^gH(W Q) § 

>,-H <dPPldHPHld<WP0)3 


O P 


<D <d 


o id 


(d O « 'D P P 


•P H P>H 


wx-H(d<dxJ0(d3-H3(drHQ) 


XI p 


0) <w CO 1 c cu 


P 3 CO 3 


o »a a) a) cuxt o) cu^ iohac 


CO-H 


as o <d o o) g oj 


(d <D u 


43ftkffiKfl) gao MCS (U 

p p S id ow 'H(dHOiH c 


cu 


> -h a a) h 


Q) W P W 


w 


a) c -dwnj-H 


as <d p id 
> < > 


o> <d as o o> o> e a'do wiuco 


•H Q) 


>ohm a 


OQ) 0>>W>i>PO>iid-HO-H 


id c « 


•H -H (d <d H H W 


>i<d 


C Q H >i-H -H p -H Id >i P > C -H -p 


•H O 


4J^i bU id id 


D>P 6 


id (dS4J4^oid-PU£<dO(d4J(d 


C 0^0 


nidfl) p p w 
a; ih jq o> xi xt s 


c <d o p <d p u 





•H C XJ Xt -H Xt 


0)XtQ)0>0)POQ)0)Q)OXiOP'd 


g'H «H 


tP id P> 0) Q> -P 


D>o a a) t3 a) 


&>»c o> -p tj> &> id g o>p> p e o) p -h >i 


3 -o -a 


o c a) o o a) 4J 


id o & o) id a) 


C TJ P 3 C C CUH C 3 3 rH P 4J CUjtS 


<y p p 


33CJUOOa)30UU3Q)CCOQ> 


c id id 


OHU<«uuwaoK3uuUhqwui<uuK04O<<ci«UH*:a&oo 

0) 

id 



H-«*w<NHnHr*a<*vowt^r^cMtocooNOvo<fto>Hmocorgv0Ocor , *n 
coc^cot^fnooin^sor^oxvooxvot^ojiftotoxinr^cooot^cor^ino^^oovot^ 

• 

co 
o 
e 

00 P 



OHO 
U 0) H 
•H CO H 
P CO Q) 
P 3-H 
3 « XJ 
O O 
O »-H 

ft* c 

PI >iS 
0) 

>iO id 

id -P o) 
s wi3 



c 

X id 
cue* 



0) 

a c 

•H 
• iH 

PJXI 

o 

0) CQ 

c 

C (0 

<d«H 

0> P 
h) H 



u 










H 






•H <D 










H 






C P c 




•H (0 






0) 






IdTJXJ 


>iVi 






XI 


>l 




•H H Id 


Q) 


a) id 


id 







<D 




HON 


(0 H 


•H«H H 




•O P H 




id s • 


M H P H H 


W Tj 


M 


* 


<D Q) 


CH 


•H 


•H 


o 


O 


OH < 5 


> 


C H 


S 


0) 


O 


U S 




C 


• 




O 


• as c ft 




• 


0) 


• a 


• 




« id 


CO 


• • 


as o 


w 


• 


• •H 


• 


SJ 






X! 




> 


<y fa p b o) 




A 


<d 


ZV 


<d 




D> 10 


•H 


id h 


ft'H 


Q) £ 


CU 


^1 C-H 


>i (0 


S5 


0) H 


J-i C P 





O XJ ^ 


!vi (0 


(0 


0) T3 C 


M 


id 


S^6 


<d 0) 


O P 


O 


1 


C 0) 


id 


p. 


gbZWb 


<xgo 



c 
>iid 
0) -o 



H 



4J O 

0) 0) C 

c u id 

c id p 

(0 tPU) 

N p C 

3 <d o 



0) 
(0 

0) u 
0) 0) 
«H 

p 
• w 

CO 
-O H 

u 

id x: 
^ -p 
o 3 

as a; 



c 

0) 

xs 
w o 

H O 

p 
p • 

g . 

Q)-H 
•H > 

W H 
H Q) 

W S 



6H 

O Q) 
P P 
CO o 



X £ 



>iC 



O 6 X? 
•O id id 
O *r\ N 

cu c-h 

X! 0) H 

Eh OQ W 



io id 
c n 

•H N 

•H-H 
Q Q P 
<D 
• • H 

a<p 

p xj pa 
0) cu 
xj cu c 
■P co id 

CO O 0) 

w b hj 



voomiNntniMinHHr^Hoo^Hn^tvocoH^o^tvot^ON^ooHroo 

HNNHHHIN HWHCgnnH i-\ i-i r4 C* HHHHHOJOJ H 



e oj 



co co co to a> xt 

>i>i>iC C C CHHH CT«CT»D>&CUP 

«ig*33S3333333SlH} 
SSJfibhhbbbb<<!<4!WO 



P P 

a) a) 

xt xt 

o o 

p p 

o o 

o o 



ppppppppppp 

iiilfiiiiii 

>>>>>>>>OUO 
OOOOOOOOQ)0)Q) 

2Z2!Z2!2S2!ZQQQ 



151 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 26, 19931 



Norfolk, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said 
County, GREETINGS 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to 
vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial 
School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the twenty-ninth day of 
March, A.D., 1993 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then and there to act , 
on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected 
annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator and one Trust Fund Commissioner for one year. 

One Park Commissioner, one Trust Fund Commissioner for two 
years. 

One member of the Board of Selectmen, one Assessor, two 
members of the School Committee, two members of the Library 
Trustees, three Park Commissioners, one Trust Fund 
Commissioner for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the 
Housing Authority for five years. 

The polls will be open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be 
closed at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-sixth day of April, AD, 1993, commencing 
at 7:40 o'clock P.M. the following articles will be acted on 
in the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium in said 
Medfield, viz: 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an 
attested copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants 
in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of 
meeting aforesaid. Given unto our hands this fifteenth of 
March, 1993, AD Nineteen Hundred and Ninety-three. 

Harold F. Pritoni 
Ann B. Thompson 
Tidal B. Henry 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



152 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

TOWN ELECTION 

MARCH 29, 1993 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 
6:00 A.M. with the reading of the warrant, and the swearing in 
of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots 
posted, voting list was displayed and instructions to the 
voters posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts. 

WARDEN: Nancy Franke 

CLERKS: Precinct 1: Mabelle Maguire 

Precinct 2: Joan Bussow 

Precinct 3 : Emmy Mitchell 

Precinct 4: Katherine Buchanan 

CHECKERS: Priscilla Anderson, David Wilmarth, Sadie Carson, 
Beverly Hallowell, Marshall Chick, Dorothy Sumner, Phyllis 
Wilmarth, and Gail Rad. 

BALLOT COUNTERS: Mabelle Maguire, Gail Rad, Priscilla 
Anderson, Anna Murphy, Sadie Carson, Emmy Mitchell, Phyllis 
Wilmarth, David Wilmarth, Joan Bussow, Marshall Chick, 
Katherine Buchanan, Frances Colella, Dorothea Gaughran 
Elizabeth Lordon, Anna Floser, Patricia Rioux, George Mentzer, 
Ann Mentzer, Georgia Colivas, and Dorothy Sumner. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1,859. Absentee ballots 49. 
Total Registered Voters numbered 6944, 27% of the voters 
voting. After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the 
results were as follows: 



MODERATOR (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 
Ralph C. Copeland 267 458 
Blanks 99 137 

SELECTMEN (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 

John F. Ganley 199 324 

Tidal B. Henry 165 265 

Blanks 2 6 

ASSESSOR (three year) VOTE FOR ONE 
Carol A. Rossi 284 497 

Blanks 82 98 



3 


4 


TOTAL 


325 


384 


1434 


85 


104 


425 


177 


216 


916 


231 


270 


931 


2 


2 


12 


320 


403 


1504 


90 


85 


355 



153 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three years) 

VOTE for not more than TWO 
Clarence A. Purvis 242 
Sharon K. Semeraro 215 
Blanks 271 

George P. Niles, Jr. 2 
Robert A. Kinsman 2 

Scattered 



431 


288 


355 


1316 


368 


263 


299 


1145 


390 


279 


322 


1252 
2 
2 


1 






1 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 
(three years) 
VOTE for not more than THREE 
Nina B. French 266 

William Heller 8 

Robert W. Miller 5 

Blanks 817 

Scattered 2 



451 


314 


367 


19 


2 


22 


13 


1 


18 


301 


913 


1057 


1 







1398 
51 
37 

4088 
3 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 

(two years) VOTE for not more than ONE 
David A. Armstrong 265 
Blanks 101 



PLANNING BOARD (five years) 
VOTE for ONE 
David E. Sharff 256 

Blanks 110 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (five years) 
VOTE for ONE 
James T. Regan 193 

Diane L. Maxson 126 

Blanks 47 

TRUST FUND COMMISSION (one year) 

VOTE for ONE 
Lisa C. Wood 258 

Blanks 108 

TRUST FUND COMMISSION (two years) 

VOTE for ONE 
Michael J. Sullivan 270 
Blanks 96 

TRUST FUND COMMISSION (three years) 

VOTE for ONE 
Georgia K. Colivas 248 
Blanks 118 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES (three years) 

VOTE for not more than TWO 
Maura Y. McNicholas 266 
Willis H. Peligian 213 
Blanks 253 



461 


304 


372 


134 


106 


116 


439 


290 


360 


156 


120 


128 


341 


246 


298 


183 


120 


153 


71 


38 


43 


457 


306 


368 


138 


104 


120 


462 


312 


388 


133 


98 


100 


440 


292 


364 


155 


118 


124 


462 


317 


384 


365 


233 


324 


363 


270 


268 



1402 
457 



1345 
514 



1078 
582 
199 



1389 
470 



1432 
427 



1344 
515 



1429 
1135 
1154 



154 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting 
lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



On April 14, 1993, a recount of the ballots for the Office of 
Selectmen was held at Town Hall. The results were: 

PRECINCT 

12 3 4 TOTAL 

John F. Ganley 197 324 177 216 914 

Tidal B. Henry 166 265 231 271 933 

Blanks 3 6 2 1 12 

Total 366 595 410 480 1859 



155 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 1993 
APRIL 26, 1993 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:40 PM a 
the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium afte 
ascertaining that a quorum was present. We started out wit 
the Medfield Chorus group singing America the Beautiful, an 
our National Anthem, after which we did the salute to ou 
American Flag. 

Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for th 
meeting, as well as a review of procedural rules by th 
Moderator, the following action was taken on the article 
appearing in the Warrant: 

The following articles were acted on, viz: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the report 
of the several Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted to accept the reports of the severa 
Town Officers for the past year. 

(Consent Calendar) 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize th 
Treasurer/Collector to use all means in the collection o 
taxes as the Treasurer/Collector might if elected to tha 
office. 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Treasurer /Collector t 
use all means in the collection of taxes a 
the Treasurer. 

(Consent Calendar) 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept th 
following named sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care o 
lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof as may b 
necessary for said care, viz: 

Richard E. Gilman $ 700 

Richard L. and H. Joyce Goodwin 350 

Gertrude L. Ehnes 350 

Catherine P. Bickel 700 

Joseph A. and Mary Gillis 300 

Donna Zuzevich Gavaghan 700 

Beverly L. Hallowell 700 

Frances Gould 120 

George J.R. Sauer 2,800 

Dorothy Kopf 350 

Michael Flynn 350 

James M. and Sharon Keane 350 

Francis A. and Elizabeth M. Logue 1,400 

William Stewart 350 
Richard L. McCurry, Grace D. and 

Gail A. Dahlberg 1,400 

Andrew R. and Elizabeth Logie 2,800 

Arthur Milton 350 

$14,070 

156 



VOTE: Voted to accept the following named sums as 
Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in 
the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof 
as may be necessary for said care. 

(Consent Calendar) 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public 
1 rays the following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Village Way from Station 0+00 to 2+10.00 
Thomas Clewes Road Station 0+00 to 4+70.51 
John Crowder Road Station 0+00 to 1+90.65 
Joseph Pace Road Station 0+0 to 2+10.95 

is laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans 
eferred to in the several Orders of Layout on file with the 
own Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
icquire be eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles 
md easements, including drainage easements, as may be 
lecessary to accomplish such purposes, or do or act anything 
In relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 4/26/93 

VOTE: Voted to accept as public ways the following 
named streets, Village Way from Station 0+00 
to 2+10.00, Thomas Clewes Road in its 
entirety; John Crowder Road in its entirety; 
John Pace Road in its entirety as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans 
referred to in the several Orders of Layout 
on file with the Town Clerk's office and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, 
titles and easements, including drainage 
easements, as may be necessary to accomplish 
such purposes. 

(Consent Calendar) 4-26-93 

\RTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept an equal 
educational opportunity grant for Fiscal Year 1994 in the 
mount of $101,062 under the provisions of General Laws 
Chapter 70A, Section 5 as inserted by Chapter 188 of the Acts 
Df 1985; said grant shall be expended by the Tri-County 
Regional Vocational Technical School District Committee for 
iirect service expenditures, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Tri-County Regional Voc. Technical School) 

VOTE: Voted to accept an equal educational 
opportunity grant for Fiscal Year 1993 in the 
amount of $101,062. under the provisions of 
General Laws of Chapter 70A, Section 5 as 
inserted by Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985; 
said grant shall be expended by the 
Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District Committee for direct service 
expenditures. 

(Consent Calendar) 4-26-93 



157 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of conducting a 
Hazardous Waste Collection Day, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $4500 on the 1994 tax levy for the 
purpose of conducting a Hazardous Waste 
Collection Day. 

4-26-93 

ARTICLE 8. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to 
transfer from the Wetlands Protection Fee Fund and appropriate 
for the use of the Conservation Commission to complete project 
reviews and to issue regulatory decisions within required 
timeframes, including but not limited to the costs of engaging 
consultant and technical assistance for project reviews and 
administrative and clerical costs associated with processing 
the application and decision, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sum of $6849.48 to 
the Wetlands Protection Fund for the use of 
the Conservation Commission in carrying out 
its duties under the provisions of the 
Wetlands Protection Act. 

4-26-93 

ARTICLE 9. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate on the fiscal 1994 tax levy to be used in 
conjunction with and in addition to any funds allotted by the- 
Commonwealth for the construction, reconstruction and 
improvement of roads under the provisions of Section 34, 
Chapter 90 of the General Laws, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 

VOTE: Voted that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to enter into contracts with the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of 
Public Works and to expend funds allotted by 
the Commonwealth for the construction, 
reconstruction and improvement of roads under 
the provisions of Section 34 of Chapter 90 of 
the General Laws. 

Consent Calendar 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
and/ or transfer sums of money necessary to pay salaries owed 
from previous fiscal years to Lois Lambert in the amount of 
$912 and to Ann Spencer in the amount of $1,077, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

VOTE: Unanimously voted that the Town raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1989 on the 1994 tax 



158 



levy for the purpose of paying salaries owed 
from previous fiscal years to school 
employees. 

This required a 4/5 vote, which went through unanimous. 

4-26-93 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary 
and compensation of the following elected officers: 
(Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, 
Trustees of the Public Library, Park and Recreation 
Commission, Planning Board, Housing Authority, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 





Present 


Warrant Comm. 


Officer 


Salary 


Recommends 


Moderator 








Housing Authority 








Town Clerk 


13,519 


13,992 


Selectman, Chairman 


900 


900 


Selectman, Clerk 


800 


800 


Selectman, 3rd Member 


800 


800 


Assessors, Chairman 


900 


900 


Assessors, Clerk 


900 


900 


Assessors, 3rd Member 


900 


900 


School Committee 








Library Trustees 








Planning Board 








Park & Recreation Commission 








Trust Fund Commissioners 









VOTE: Voted to fix the salary and compensation of 
the following elected officers: Moderator, 
Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School 
Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, 
Park and Recreation Commission, Planning 
Board, Housing Authority, as set out in the 
Warrant. 

(Consent Calendar 4-26-93) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel Administration Plan, Section XIII. LEAVES OF ABSENCE 
by deleting paragraph 1. under A. Sick Leave and substituting 
the following: 

"1. Upon completion of 30 days regular full-time or regular 

>art-time employment, an employee shall be allowed one and 

ne-quarter days' sick leave, based on the average number of 

ours worked per day, with pay for each month of employment 

ompleted in any given calendar year provided sick leave is 

caused by sickness or injury or be an exposure to contagious 

iisease, but not injury sustained in other employment," or do 

or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



159 



Hourly positions 



Children's Librarian 


9 


,36 


11.67 


12.79 


Referemce Librarian 


9 


.36 


11.67 


12.79 


HOURLY 


PAID POSITIONS 










Grade 


Minimum 


Steo 2 


Steo 3 


Step 4 


SteD 5 


1 


6.16 


6.46 


6.80 


7.15 


7.56 


2 


6.46 


6.80 


7.15 


7.56 


7.92 


3 


6.80 


7.15 


7.56 


7.92 


8.37 


4 


7.15 


7.56 


7.92 


8.37 


8.80 


5 


7.56 


7.92 


8.37 


8.80 


9.24 


6 


7.92 


8.37 


8.80 


9.24 


9.74 


7 


8.37 


8.80 


9.24 


9.74 


10.26 


8 


8.80 


9.24 


9.74 


10.26 


10.78 


9 


9.24 


9.74 


10.26 


10.78 


11.39 


10 


9.74 


10.26 


10.78 


11.39 


11.96 


11 


10.26 


10.78 


11.39 


11.96 


12.64 


12 


10.78 


11.39 


11.96 


12.64 


13.26 


13 


11.39 


11.96 


12.64 


13.26 


13.96 


14 


11.96 


12.64 


13.26 


13.96 


14.70 


15 


12.64 


13.26 


13.96 


14.70 


15.48 


16 


13.26 


13.96 


14.70 


15.48 


16.28 


17 


13.96 


14.70 


15.48 


16.28 


17.11 


18 


14.70 


15.48 


16.28 


17.11 


17.98 



Minimum Wage $4.25 per hour. Lower rates as authorized by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts may also be paid. 



VII. STEP INCREASES - MERIT: 

Progression through the rate ranges normally will be one 



step 



annually on employee's anniversary date provided this ii 
recommended by the Department Head and the Personnel Board. 

A. General Increase: When rate ranges are affected by 
increase voted by the Town, either fixed percentage or fixed 
amount, all employees covered by the Plan, except those* 
holding personal rates shall receive the increase and the rate 
ranges will be adjusted accordingly. Those holding personal 
rates shall not receive increases until the maximum for the 
classification exceeds the personal rate. 

B. Management Pay for Performance: Employees in town 
management positions as set out in the CLASSIFICATION OF 
POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE will be considered annually for 
increases in accordance with a performance rating system to be 
adopted and amended from time to time by the Personnel Board. 

XV. SPECIAL PROVISIONS: 

B. Snow Removal: Time and one-half for the time worked, 
other than the normal schedule. Double time for time worked 
on Sundays and Holidays, and after sixteen consecutive hours. 



160 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 
Grade X 

Swimming Instructor 
Lifeguard Instructor 

$1,477. minimum per season 
Lifeguard 

$1,230. minimum per season 
Playground Counselor 

Grade 2 

Intern/Trainee 

Grade 3 

Laborer 

Grade 4 

Library Assistant 
Clerk Typist 

Cemetery Foreman 
Minibus Driver 
(Council on Aging) 

Grade 5 

Skilled Laborer 
Executive Director 
(Council on Aging) ) 

Grade 6 

Senior Library Assistant 
Secretary 

grade 7 

Col lector /Bookkeeper /Secretary 
Police Matron 
Traffic Supervisor 
Skating Supervisor 
Grade 8 

Presently no jobs 

Grade 9 

Senior Secretary 
Truck Driver 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Call Firefighters 

Grade 10 
Presently no jobs 



Grade XX 

Light Equipment Operator 
Municipal Buildings 

Custodian Administrative 

Secretary 



Graqe 12 
Wastewater Treatment 

Plant Operator 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Groundskeeper 

Grade 13 

Equipment Operator Repair 
Finance/Data Processing 
Supervisor 

Grade 14 

Senior Groundskeeper 
Tree Warden/ Insect Pest 

Control 
Senior Heavy Equipment 

Operator 
Senior Water Technician 
Senior Waste Water 

Treatment Operator 

Grade 15 

Asst. Wastewater 
Treatment Operator- in 
-Charge 

Senior Equipment Operator 
Repairman 

Grade 16 

Presently no jobs 
Grade 17 

Street /Water /Sewer 

Foreman 
Wastewater Treatment 

Plant Operator- in-Charge 

Grade 18 

Senior Wastewater 
Treatment Operator-in 
-Charge 

Senior Foreman 



161 



SPECIAL RATE/ FEE POSITIONS 

PART TIME/TEMPORARY 

Deputy Collector 
Ambulance E.M.T. 
Police Intern 

Waterfront Director 

Asst. Waterfront Director 

Park & Recreation Administrator 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Tree Climber 

Veteran's Agent 

Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 
Local Inspector of Buildings 
Gas Inspector 
Assistant Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Assistant Wiring Inspector 
Zoning Enforcing Officer 
Health Agent 
Street Inspector 



Fee 

$13.99 per hour 

$261 to $344 per week 

$3,428 to $4,474 per year 

$213 to $293 per week 

$7,750 per year 

$350 per year 

$842 per year 

$1,480 per year 

$7.50 to $12.12 per hour 

$4,349 per year 



$1,823 per year 
$ 626 per year 
$ 464 per year 
$ 464 per year 
$ 464 per year 

$17.33 per inspection 

Annual Minimum $3,354 
Annual Minimum $ 449 
Annual Minimum $ 924 
Annual Minimum $ 169 
Annual Minimum $2,739 
Annual Minimum $ 628 
Annual Minimum $1,525 
Annual Minimum $ 449 
17.33 per inspection 
17.33 per inspection 
9.11 per hour 



(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Personnel Administration Plan, 
Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules 
be amended, effective July 1, 1993 to read as 
set out in the warrant, except under Police 
Department (Weekly) the following be 
substituted: 



Police Sergeant 
Police Officer 



Minimum 


SteD 2 


SteD 3 


Step 4 Maximum 


583.52 


607.02 


636.45 


661.91 


458.16 


490.30 


528.01 


563.18 585.61 



4-26-93 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds sums of money requested by the 
Selectmen or any other Town Officer, Board, Commission and 



162 



Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town for the 
fiscal year commencing July 1, 1993, or such other sums as the 
Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, 
Section 108, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the Town appropriate the sums of 
money as set out in Article 14 of the Warrant 
Report, (as amended) to defray the operating 
expenses of the Town for the fiscal year 
commencing July 1, 1993 and to meet these 
expenses $15,393,408 be raised on the tax 
levy, $548,000 be raised from water revenues, 
and 597,400 be raised from sewer revenues. 

ARTICLE 15. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate 
on the Fiscal 1994 tax levy and/or transfer from available 
funds for Capital Expenditures including the following: 



DEPARTMENT 



PROJECT TITLE 



PLANNING BOARD 

PARK & REC 
ROOF 



GIS/CADD MAPPING 
REPLACE PFAFF CENTER CENTER 

replace 2 pfaff center doors 
dredging baker's pond 
Prepare conceptual drawings 



FIRE 



LARGE DIAMETER HOSE 
FIRE ALARM TRUCK 
HEPATITIS B VACCINES 
REPLACEMENT OF CHIEF'S 
FIRE APPARATUS 



CAR 



AMBULANCE 
POLICE 



AMBULANCE RADIO 

CRUISER REPLACEMENT 
NEW COMPUTER 
TRAFFIC LIGHT STUDY 
INVESTIGATIVE EQUIPMENT 



LIBRARY 

ASSESSORS 

CEMETERY 



EXTERIOR RENOVATIONS 

REEVALUATION 

EXPANSION ON BRIDGE ST, 
PAVE AVENUES 



SIDE 



SCHOOL 



INSTALL GAS FIRED HEATING 

UNITS/ALL SCHOOLS 
REPLACE WHEELOCK GYM FLOOR 

COVERING 
REPLACE DOOR CLOSERS & SEAL 

WINDOWS AT WHEELOCK 
TREAT SPORTS FIELD AT MIDDLE 

& HIGH 
NEW SPORTS FIELD AT WHEELOCK 
CONSTRUCT STORAGE FACILITY 



163 



REPLACE 8 PERIMETER DOORS AT 

MIDDLE 
REPLACE 10 PERIMETER DOORS AT 

WHEELOCK 
INSTALL LIGHT SYSTEM AT DALE 
PAINT LOCKER ROOM EQUIPMENT 

AT MIDDLE 
PAINT BATHROOM EQUIPMENT AT 

MIDDLE 



TOWN HALL 



WINDOW REPLACEMENT AND 

RENOVATIONS 
HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBILITY 



DPW EQUIPMENT 



SIX WHEEL MACK TRUCK 
ROLL-OFF TRAILER 
SIDEWALK PLOW 
3/4 TON 4X4 
TUBGRINDER 



HIGHWAY 



DESIGN FOUNDRY/PHILIP BRIDGES 
CONSTRUCT ABOVE BRIDGES 
DESIGN NOON HILL ROAD 
RESURFACE SUBDIVISIONS 
RESURFACE CAUSEWAY STREET 
RESURFACE MAIN STREET 
HARTFORD ST. DRAINAGE DESIGN 
CAUSEWAY ST. DRAINAGE DESIGN 
COMPREHENSIVE LANDFILL STUDY 



and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee be 
further authorized to contract with and otherwise treat with 
any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost 
of any capital expenditure; and that the Board of Selectmen 
and the School Committee respectively be authorized to trade 
or sell toward part of the purchase price, the following: 



Trade or Sell: 



DEPARTMENT 



TRADE-IN OR SELL 



FIRE 1987 CROWN VICTORIA 

POLICE 1989 CROWN VICTORIA 

AMBULANCE 1988 CHEVROLET AMBULANCE 

HIGHWAY 1978 SIX WHEEL FORD SANDER 

1984 CHEVROLET 3/4 4X4 TON 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 



DEPARTMENT PROJECT TITLE 



REQUEST RECOMMEND 



PLANNING 
PARK & REC 



FIRE 



GIS/CADD MAPPING 
REPLACE PFAFF ROOF 
REPLACE TWO PFAFF DOORS 
DREDGE BAKER'S POND 
CONCEPTUAL DRAWINGS 
LARGE DIAMETER HOSE 
FIRE ALARM TRUCK 



164 



$50,000 
6,000 
5,000 
5,000 
8,000 
10,000 
15,000 





5,000 
5,000 
4,000 
5,000 









HEPATITIS B VACCINE 


5,500 







CHIEF CAR REPLACEMENT 


20,000 


20,000 




FIRE PUMPER 


48,500 


48,500 


AMBULANCE 


RADIO 


5,620 





POLICE 


CRUISER REPLACEMENT 


15,680 


15,680 




NEW COMPUTER 


53,075 


25,000 




TRAFFIC LIGHT STUDY 


12,335 


12,335 




INVESTIGATIVE EQUIPMENT 


5,250 





LIBRARY 


EXTERIOR RENOVATIONS 


5,500 


5,500 


ASSESSORS 


REEVALUATION 


25,000 





CEMETERY 


EXPANSION-BRIDGE ST. SIDE 


25,000 


25,000 




PAVING 


15,000 


15,000 


TOWN HALL 


WINDOW REPLACEMENT AND 








RENOVATIONS 


50,000 


50,000 




HANDICAPPED ACCESS 


50,000 


50,000 


SCHOOL 


HEAT CONVERSION-ALL SCHOOLS 30,000 


24,000 




GYM FLOOR/WHEELOCK 


9,000 


9,000 




DOOR CLOSERS/WHEELOCK 


5,875 







SPORTS FIELD-MIDDLE/HIGH 


14,600 


14,600 




NEW FIELD/WHEELOCK 


28,200 


28,200 




CONSTRUCT STORAGE FACILITY 


25,000 







REPLACE 8 DOORS/MIDDLE 


15,200 


15,200 




REPLACE 10 DOORS/WHEELOCK 


19,000 


19,000 




LIGHT SYSTEM/DALE 


8,000 







PAINT LOCKER ROOM/MIDDLE 


5,000 







PAINT BATHROOM/MIDDLE 


5,000 





D.P.W. 


SIX WHEEL MACK TRUCK 


64,900 


64,900 


EQUIPMENT 


ROLL OFF TRAILER 


35,000 







SIDEWALK PLOW 


45,500 


45,500 




3/4 TON 4X4 


18,000 







TUBGRINDER 


95,000 





DEPARTMENT 


PROJECT TITLE 


REOUEST 


RECOMMEND 


HIGHWAY 


DESIGN FOUNDRY/PHILIP 








BRIDGES 


$42,000 


$ o 




CONSTRUCT ABOVE BRIDGES 


53,000 







NOON HILL ROAD DESIGN 


6,000 


6,000 




RESURFACE SUBDIVISIONS 


40,000 


40,000 




RESURFACE CAUSEWAY STREET 


55,233 


55,233 




RESURFACE MAIN STREET 


120,000 


120,000 




HARTFORD DRAINAGE DESIGN 


15,000 







CAUSEWAY DRAINAGE DESIGN 


35,000 







LANDFILL STUDY 


90.000 






TOTALS 

To be funded by: 



$399,837 

175,233 

40,000 

2,600 

34.978 

$652,648 



$1,318,968 $ 652,648 

Tax levy 

State highway Funds 

Sale of Lots Fund 

Trade-ins or sale 

Unexpended article balances 



VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sums as set out in 
the warrant and to meet this appropriation 
$339,837 be raised on the 1994 tax levy, 
$175,233 from State highway funds, $40,000 



165 



from Sale of Lots Fund, $2,600 from Trade-ins 
or sale of automobiles or equipment and 
$3 3,000 of the unexpended balance of Article 
15, ATM 1992, Gas Conversion Middle School, 
and $1,978 from the unexpended balance of 
Article 23, ATM 1991, Wheelock School 
Chairlift, for a total of $652,648. 

(Capital Budget Committee Motion 4-26-93) 

WARRANT COMMITTEE AMENDMENT: 

Voted to amend the motion on the floor by substituting 
in the Fire Department $5,000. instead of $10,000 for a large 
diameter hose, eliminating $15,000 for the fire alarm truck 
and adding $20,000 for the Chief's car replacement. 
(Carried 4-26-93) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS. by adding to 
the notes following the table the word "contiguous" following 
the words, " * The percentage of" and before the word "land," 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that SECTION 6.2 TABLE OF 

AREA REGULATIONS of the Zoning Bylaw be 

amended by adding the word "contiguous" to 

notes following the table at the first star 

to read as follows: 

* The percentage of contiguous land not in the 

Wetlands, Watershed and/or Flood Plain District 

which must be used in calculating the minimum lot 

area. 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATION NOTES' . by 
deleting Paragraph 6.2.6 and substituting therefor the 
following: 

"6.2.6 Building within the following districts will be 
subject to their respective Zoning Bylaw sections: Open 
Space Residential Zoning, Section 7; Flood Plain 
District, Section 10; Watershed Protection District, 
Section 11; and Aquifer Protection District, Section 
16," 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 
(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that SECTION 6.2 TABLE OF 
AREA REGULATION NOTES paragraph 6.2.6 of the 
Zoning Bylaw be amended as set out in the 
warrant . 

4-26-93 
ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, SECTION 7 OPEN SPACE RESIDENTIAL ZONING by deleting 
Section 7.1.1, paragraph 2 and substituting therefor the 
following: 



166 



"The owner or such agent shall at the same time file a 
copy of the application with all accompanying plans and 
Environmental Impact Statement with the Board of Health, the 
Water and Sewerage Board, the Superintendent of Public Works, 
the Conservation Commission and the Planning Board, which 
Boards, Commission and Superintendent shall, within thirty 
days from the date of receipt of such documents by them, file 
their written recommendations concerning said applications 
with the Appeals Board. If no such recommendations are filed 
within thirty days, said Boards, Commission and Superintendent 
shall, have been deemed to have no recommendations on the 
application." 

(Planning Board) 



VOTE: Voted unanimously that SECTION 7 OPEN SPACE 
RESIDENTIAL ZONING, Section 7.1.1 paragraph 2 
of the Zoning Bylaw be deleted and 
substituted with the following: "paragraph" 
set out in the Warrant. 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw SECTION 7 OPEN SPACE RESIDENTIAL ZONING by deleting 
7.1.2.8 as it now reads and substituting the following: 

"7.1.2.8 Minimum lot size shall be 12,000 square feet 
in area, 80-foot frontage and a perfect square 80 feet 
x 80 feet, 100-foot width, 100-foot depth, 20-foot 
front yard, 12-foot side yards and 30 foot rear yard." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that SECTION 7 OPEN SPACE 
RESIDENTIAL ZONING, Section 7.1.2.8 be 
deleted as it now reads and substitute the 
following as set out in the Warrant. 

4-26-93 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, 16.5 USES IN WELL PROTECTION ZONE (ZONE 1). Section 
16.5.1 f) by deleting the words "two acres" and substituting 
in their place, "80,000 square feet" or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. (Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that 16.5 USES IN WELL 
PROTECTION ZONE (ZONE 1), Section 16.5.1 of 
the Zoning Bylaw be amended by deleting the 
words "two acres" and substituting in their 
place, "80,000 square feet" as set out in the 
Warrant. 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town 
Bylaws ARTICLE IV POLICE REGULATIONS by adding the following: 

"SECTION 33. SCENIC ROADS 



167 



In accordance with M.F.L., Chapter 40, Section 15C as 
amended, Scenic Roads Act, any violation of said law 
shall be punishable by a fine of $300 for each 
offense. Each five foot break or portion thereof in a 
wall or the cutting of each tree of 2 inch diameter or 
greater, shall be considered a separate offense." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted that ARTICLE IV POLICE REGULATIONS of 
the Town Bylaws be amended by adding SECTION 
33. SCENIC ROADS as printed in the Warrant. 
4-26-93 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 13.3.11 by adding the following: 

"Such sign(s) shall conform to the U.S. Department of 
Transportation Manual on Uniform Traffic Control | 
Devices" or do or act anything in relation thereto. 
(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Unanimously voted that Section 13.2.11 of the 
Zoning Bylaw be amended by adding the 
following: 

"Such sign(s) shall conform to the U.S. Department of 
Transportation Manual on Uniform Traffic Control 
Devices." 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, by adding to SECTION 7 OPEN SPACE RESIDENTIAL ZONING 
the following: 

"7.1.2.9 The Board of Appeals may set square footage 
limits on living space for individual residences" or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 
(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
53 E 1/2 to provide for an Ambulance Revolving Fund to be used 
for the Ambulance Lease Purchase Payment, funds not to exceed 
$11,158.83, to come from the Ambulance Mileage Fee Account and 
to authorize the Police Chief to expend from said funds, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: A Voted that the Town accept the provisions of 
M.G.L, Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2 to provide 
for an Ambulance Revolving Fund to be used 
for the Ambulance Lease Purchase payment, 
funds not to exceed $11,158.83 to come from 
the Ambulance Mileage Fee Account and to 
authorize the Police Chief to expend from 

168 



said funds. 

VOTED: B That the Town Accountant shall provide a 
quarterly accounting of all transactions that 
occur in within this revolving fund. Said 
accounting shall be made in writing to the 
Board of Selectmen and Warrant Committee 
within 3 days following the close of each 
calendar quarter. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of 
Medf ield Bylaw ARTICLE XV - FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS by adding a new 
SECTION 11. MAINTENANCE FEES as follows: 

"SECTION 11. MAINTENANCE FEES: 

Every Master Box owner whose fire alarm system is 
directly connected to the Town of Medfield municipal 
fire alarm system shall be assessed an annual 
maintenance fee of $180. per master box. This 
maintenance fee shall be reviewed from time to time and 
may be adjusted to reflect the cost of maintaining the 
municipal system. Any change in the maintenance fee 
will be done with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen. 



Municipal 
fee. 



buildings will not be assessed a maintenance 



Billing will take place on July 1, 
with payment due in 3 days. 



of the fiscal year 



The fees that are collected for the maintaining of the 
municipal fire alarm system shall be deposited in a 
revolving fund for said purpose." 

and further to see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 
53E 1/2 to provide for a Fire Alarm Revolving Fund to be used 
for fire alarm maintenance, equipment or supplies, funds not 
to exceed $5,000 to come from the Maintenance Fee Account and 
to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 



VOTE: A Voted to amend the Town of Medfield Bylaw 
ARTICLE XV - FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS by adding a 
new SECTION 11, MAINTENANCE FEES as set out 
in the warrant; 

VOTE: B Voted to further accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 53E 1/2 to provide for a Fire Alarm 
Revolving Fund to be used for fire alarm 
maintenance, equipment or supplies, funds not 
to exceed $5000 to come from the Maintenance 
Fee Account and to authorize the Fire Chief 
to expend from said funds. 4-27-93 



169 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Town 
of Medf ield Bylaw a new ARTICLE XVI - DEMOLITION (HISTORIC) as 
follows: 

"ARTICLE XVI - DEMOLITION (HISTORIC) 

SECTION 1. - Intent and Purpose 

This bylaw is adopted for the purpose of protecting the 
historic and aesthetic resources of the Town of Medfield by 
preserving, rehabilitating, or restoring whenever possible, 
buildings, structures, or archeological sites which constitute 
or reflect distinctive features of the architectural or 
historic resources of the Town, thereby promoting the public 
welfare and preserving the cultural heritage of Medfield. 

SECTION 2. Definitions 

2.1 Commission: The Medfield Historical Commission. 

2.2 Demolition Permit: The permit issued by the Inspector 
as required by the State Building Code for the 
demolition, partial demolition, or removal of a 
building or structure. 

2.3 Historically significant structure: Any building, 
structure, or archeological site which is; 

a. Importantly associated with one or more historic 
persons or events, or with the architectural, cultural, 
political, economic, social history of the Town of 
Medfield, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, or the 
United States of America, or which is; 

b. Historically or architecturally important by reason of 
period, style, method of construction, or association 
with a particular architect or builder, either by 
itself or in the context of a group of buildings or 
structures. 

2.4 Inspector: The Building Inspector of the Town of 
Medfield. 

2.5 Preferably preserved: Any historically significant 
structure which, because of the important contribution 
made by such structure to the Town's historical or 
architectural resources, is in the public interest to 
preserve, rehabilitate, or restore. 

2.6 Premises: The parcel of land on which an historically 
significant structure is or was located. 

SECTION 3. Regulated Building, Structures, and Sites. 

The provisions of this bylaw shall apply to only the following 
buildings, structures, and sites: 



; 



170 



3.1 Buildings, structures, or sites listed on the National 
Register of Historic Places or the State Register of 
Historic Places. 

3.2 Buildings, structures, or sites which in whole or in 
part were constructed fifty (50) or more years prior to 
the date of the application for the demolition permit. 

3.3 Notwithstanding the above, the provisions of this bylaw 
shall not apply to any building, structure, or site 
located in a local historic district and subject to 
regulation under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 
40C. 

SECTION 4. Procedure 

4.1 Upon receipt of an application for a demolition permit 
for an historically significant building, structure or 
site, the Inspector shall forward a copy thereof to the 
Commission. No demolition permit shall be issued at 
that time. 

4.2 Within fourteen (14) days of receipt of the application 
by the Commission, the chairperson of the Commission 
shall post the date for a meeting of the Commission at 
which the application shall be heard. The hearing 
shall take place no fewer than twenty-eight (28) days 
and no more than forty-two (42) days after the receipt 
of the application from the Inspector. The Commission 
shall give public notice of the hearing by publishing 
at least fourteen (14) days before the hearing an 
announcement in a local newspaper of the time, place, 
and purpose of the hearing. The Commission shall also 
mail a copy of said notice to the applicant, to all 
abutters, to the owners of all properties deemed by the 
Commission to be affected by the proposed demolition, 
to the Medfield Historical District Commission, and to 
any others the Commission deems entitled to notice. 

4.3 If, after the hearing, the Commission determines that 
the proposed demolition of the historically significant 
building, structure, or site would not be detrimental 
to their purposes protected by this bylaw, the 
Commission shall notify the Inspector within ten (10) 
days of such determination. Upon receipt of such 
notification, or after the expiration of fifteen (15) 
days from the hearing if he has not received 
notification from the Commission, the Inspector may, 
subject to the requirements of the State Building Code 
and any other applicable laws, bylaws, rules and 
regulations, issue the demolition permit. 

4.4 If the Commission determines that the demolition of the 
historically significant building, structure, or site 
would be detrimental to the historical or architectural 
resources of the Town, such building, structure or site 
shall be declared a preferably preserved historically 
significant structure. 

171 



4 . 5 Upon a determination by the Commission that the 
historically significant structure which is the subject 
of the application for a demolition permit is a 
preferably preserved historically significant 
structure, the Commission shall notify the applicant 
and the Inspector, and no demolition permit may be 
issued for at least six (6) months after the date of 
such determination by the Commission. 

4.6 Notwithstanding the above, the Inspector may issue a 
demolition permit for a preferably preserved historical 
structure at any time after receipt of written advice 
from the Commission to the effect that either of the 
following applies: 

a. The Commission is satisfied that there is no reasonable 
likelihood that either the owner or some other 
reasonable person or group is willing to purchase, 
preserve, rehabilitate, or restore said structure, or 
said structure, or 

b. The Commission is satisfied that for at least six 
months the owner has made continuing, bona fide, and 
reasonable efforts to locate a purchaser to preserve, 
rehabilitate, and restore the subject building or 
structure, and that such efforts have been 
unsuccessful. 

SECTION 5. Enforcement and Remedies 

5.1 The Commission and the Inspector are each authorized to 
institute any and all proceedings in law or in equity 
as they deem necessary and appropriate to obtain 
compliance with the requirements of this bylaw or to 
prevent a violation thereof. 

5.2 No building permit shall be issued with respect to any 
premises upon which an historically significant 
structure has been voluntarily demolished in violation 
of this bylaw for a period of two (2) years after the 
date of the completion of such demolition. 

SECTION 6. Severability 

If any section, paragraph, or part of this bylaw be for any 
reason declared invalid or unconstitutional by any court, 
every other section, paragraph, and part shall continue in 
full force and effect," or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Medfield Historical Commission) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town of Medfield Bylaws be 
amended by adding a new ARTICLE XVI 
DEMOLITION (HISTORIC) to read as set out in 
the Warrant. 4-26-93 



172 



ARTICLE 27. To see what sum of money the Town will 
appropriate for the purposes of Clause 32 of Section 5 of 
Chapter 40 of the Massachusetts General Laws for the payment 
of reasonable hospital, medical, surgical, nursing, 
pharmaceutical, prosthetic and related expenses incurred by 
any member of its fire fighting force or any member of its 
police force as the natural and proximate result of an 
accident occurring, or of undergoing a hazard peculiar to his 
employment, while acting in the performance and within the 
scope of his duty without fault of his own, as provided in 
Section 100 of Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $3,500 on the 1994 tax levy to provide 
for the payment of reasonable medical 
expenses incurred by members of its fire 
fighting or police force in the performance 
of their duties as provided for by 
Massachusetts General Laws as set out in the 
Warrant. 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Procurement Officer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to lease for a period not to exceed twenty (20) 
years all or a portion of a parcel of Town owned land 
identified on the Medfield Assessor's Maps as Lot 37, Map 55 
for the purpose of siting a private recycling facility, said 
lease to be awarded in accordance with the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 3 0B. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN 4-26-93 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to name the 
Intersection of West Mill Street and Harding Street as 
"Richard C. Werner Square" in memory of Richard Werner who 
gave his life while serving his country during World War II 
and who remains "Missing in Action: after his plane was shot 
down off the coast of Italy during a bombing mission, and that 
a sign be made which includes a gold star and indicates this 
designation and also to authorize appropriate dedicatory 
services, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 
(Committee to Study Memorials) 

VOTE: Voted that the intersection of West Mill 
Street and Harding Street be named "Richard 
C. Werner Square" and that a sign be made 
which includes a gold star and indicates this 
designation and that appropriate dedicatory 
services be held. 

4/26/93 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Section 2 2D of Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws as amended by Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1992, 
which provide for the establishment of a retirement system 

173 



funding schedule to reduce the unfunded actuarial liability of 
the system, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town accept the provisions of 
Section 2 2D of Chapter 32 of the 
Massachusetts General Lavs as amended by 
Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1992 to provide 
for the establishment of a retirement system 
funding schedule to reduce the unfunded 
actuarial liability of the Norfolk County 
Retirement system. 

4/26/93 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Section 48 of Chapter 133 of the Acts of 1992, 
as amended by Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1992, which provide 
for an early retirement incentive program for certain 
municipal employees, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to Dismiss Article 31. 

4/26/93 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the 
Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 1994, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town authorize the Board of 
Assessors to use $340,000.00 from Free Cash 
in the Treasury for the reduction of the Tax 
Rate for Fiscal Year 1994. 4/26/93 



174 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - 1993 

October 4, 1993 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said 
County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to 
vote in Town Affairs, to meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High 
School auditorium on Monday, the 4th of October, AD, 1993, 
commencing at 7:30 P.M. o'clock, then and there to act on the 
following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town, in consideration of the grant 
of a drainage easement from the owners of 128 Green Street, 
Medfield, Massachusetts, Lot 137, Map 58 of the Assessors Maps 
of the Town of Medfield, will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to abandon and relinquish a drainage easement at 128 
Green Street, Lot 137, Map 58 of the Assessors Maps of the 
Town of Medfield, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town, in consideration 
of the grant of a drainage easement from the owners 
of 128 Green Street, Medfield, Ma, Lot 137, Map 58 
of the Assessors Maps of the Town of Medfield, 
will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
abandon and relinquish a drainage easement at 128 
Green Street, Lot 137, Map 58 of the Assessors Maps 
of the Town of Medfield, which easement is 
presently reflected on that Assessors Map. 

It passed unanimous. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
$278,089, said sum to be transferred from fiscal 1994 Chapter 
70 School Aid to be allocated in the following manner: 

2000 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 

100 Personnel $191,890 

200 Operations 89.199 

Total $278,089 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 
(School Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $273,089 be 
appropriated to the school budget 2000 
Instructional Services accounts as follows: 

100 Personnel $186,890 

200 Operations 86.199 

Total $273,089 



175 



and that to meet this appropriation, $273,089 
be transferred from the fiscal 1994 Chapter 
70 School Aid. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money, in addition to the $6,900,000 appropriated under 
Article 22 of the warrant for the 1992 Annual Town Meeting, 
for remodeling, reconstructing and constructing additions to 
the Medfield High School, including equipment and related site 
improvements; to determine whether this appropriation shall be 
raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

(School Building and Planning Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that $2,900,000 be appropriated, in 
addition to the $6,900,000 appropriated under 
Article 22 at the 1992 Annual Town Meeting for 
remodeling, reconstructing and constructing 
additions to the Medfield High School, 
including equipment and related site 
improvements; that to meet this appropriation 
the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen is authorized to borrow $2,900,000 
under General Laws chapter 44, Section 7 or 
Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948 as amended; and 
that the School Building and Planning Committee 
is authorized to take any other action 
necessary to carry out this project; provided, 
however, that this vote shall not take effect 
until the Town votes to exempt from the 
limitation on total taxes imposed by General 
Laws chapter 59, Section 21C (Proposition 2 
1/2) amounts required to pay the principal of 
and interest on the borrowing authorized by 
this vote. 



YES 



507 



NO 



101 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money for the development of an additional well and related 
facilities, including a wellhead building, pumping station 
equipment and associated water mains, and for the acquisition 
by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise of land necessary in 
connection therewith; to determine whether this appropriation 
shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that $1,600,000 be 
appropriated for the development of an 
additional well and related facilities, 
including a wellhead building, pumping 
station equipment and associated water mains, 
and for the acquisition by purchase, eminent 
domain or otherwise of land necessary in 
connection therewith; that to meet this 
appropriation the Treasurer with the approval 
of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow 



176 



$1,600,000. under General Laws chapter 44, 
Section 8; and that the Board of Water and 
Sewerage with the approval of the Selectmen 
are authorized to contract for and expend any 
federal or state aid available for the 
project. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an 
attested copy thereof in the usual place for posting warrants 
in said Medfield, fourteen days at least before the time of 
holding said meeting. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of 
meeting, aforesaid. Given under our hands this 14th day of 
September in the year One Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Ninety-three . 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr., Chairman 

Ann B. Thompson, Clerk 

Tidal B. Henry 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in 
elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, by 
posting attested copies of the same at five public places 
fourteen days before the date of the meeting, as within 
directed. 

Constable, Ronald g. Eery 

Date: September 19, 1993 



177 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 1, 1993 



Norfolk, ss 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medf ield in said 
County, GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medf ield, qualified to 
vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial 
School, in said Medf ield, on Monday, the first day of 
November, AD, 1993 at 6:00 o'clock AM, then and there to act 
on the following: 

PROPOSITION 2-1/2 DEBT SERVICE EXEMPTION QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the 
provisions of proposition two and one half, so-called, the 
amounts required to pay for the bonds to be issued, in 
addition to the bonds authorized in 1992, in order to remodel, 
reconstruct and construct additions to Medfield High School, 
including equipment and related site improvements? 

YES NO 



Polls will be open from 6:00 AM to 8:00 P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an 
attested copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants 
in said Medfield, 14 days at least before the time of holding 
said election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of 
election aforesaid, given unto our hands this fifth day of 
October, One Thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety-three. 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr., Chairman 

Ann B. Thompson, Clerk 

Tidal B, Henry, Third Member 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Norfolk, ss. 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in 
elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, by 
posting attested copies of the same at five public places 
fourteen days before the date of the meeting, as within 
directed. 
Richard D. Bishop 
Constable of Medfield 
DATE: October 7, 1993 

178 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1993 



179 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORTS 
1992, 1993, 1994 



1992 



CLASS 


PARCEL COUNT 


VALUATION 


1) Residential 


3506 


$701,347,777.00 


2) Open Space 


190 


4,604,350.00 


3) Commercial 


148 


33,287,750.00 


4) Industrial 


50 


23,212,000.00 


5) Personal Property 


151 


7,913,000.00 


Total Real and Personal 


4045 


$770,364,877.00 


Tax Levy 




$ 10,908,366.66 


Overlay 




125,028.66 


Tax Rate per thousand all 


classes 


14.16 


1993 






1) Residential 


3544 


$711,068,427.00 


2) Open Space 


175 


3,923,350.00 


3) Commercial 


145 


33,233,050.00 


4) Industrial 


39 


23,212,000.00 


5) Personal Property 


141 


7,772,400.00 


Total Real and Personal 


4044 


779,209,227.00 


Tax Levy 




11,368,706.40 


Overlay 




100,108.40 


Tax Rate per thousand all 


classes 


14.59 


1994 






1) Residential 


3669 


$725,801,850.00 


2) Open Space 


176 


3,425,550.00 


3) Commercial 


145 


31,877,700.00 


4) Industrial 


50 


23,234,200.00 


5) Personal Property 


132 


7,806,200.00 


Total Real and Personal 


4173 


792,145,500.00 


Tax Levy 




12,199,040.00 


Overlay 




95,520.70 


Tax Rate per thousand all 


classes 


15.40 



180 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Taxes Receivable as of June 30. 



Fiscal Year 


Real Estate 


Personal Prooertv 


Excise Tax 


1993 


$188,680.73 


$2,818.94 


$118,280.65 


1992 


91,074.97 


871.42 


19,242.32 


Prior Years 


20.320.89 


1,780.56 


34,125.57 


TOTAL 


$300,076.59 


$5,470.92 


$171,648.54 


Tax Title 




$94,387.36 




Taxes in Litigation 




24,337.86 




Water Rates 




$151,509.57 




Sewer Rates 




128,727.77 




ADDED TO TAXES: 








Septic 




$392.68 




Water & Sewer Liens 




3.448.22 




Apportioned Betterments 


444.23 




Committed Interest 




199.10 





Respectfully submitted, 



Robert G. Stokes 
Tax Collector 



181 



TOWN TREASURER 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Retirement/Pension $1,335,521.81 

Conservation 34,937.15 

Stabilization 150,493.17 

Group Health Insurance 64,010.03 

Special Unemployment Insurance 140,980.35 

Library Trusts 12,086.26 

Granville Dailey - Library 76,965.59 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 14,457.72 

Municipal Insurance 175,864.53 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 100,425.58 

Council on Aging 3,186.18 

Palumbo Sports Fund 3,483.49 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 381,192.24 

Moses Ellis Post #1 1 7 G.A.R. 8,735.29 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 3,899.30 

Tri-Centennial Trust 1 ,642.99 

Madelyn L. Grant Library Fund 38,145.94 

School Essay Fund 2,837.74 

Pilgrim Health Care Fund 83,323.18 

Allendale Pumping Station Fund 40,084.41 

Balance June 30, 1993 $2,672,272.95 



The foregoing is a record of cash, investments, interest earned, trust funds and 
outstanding debts for fiscal year ended June 30, 1993. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Robert G. Stokes 
Town Treasurer/Collector 



182 



TOWN TREASURER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Receipts Fiscal 1993- 

including investment returns $23,171,714.96 

Disbursements Fiscal 1993 - 

including reinvestments 18,098,512.92 

Cash in Banks June 30, 1993 $8,203,054.69 

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 
Pooled Investment Fund 
Investments June 30, 1992 995.709.31 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments - 
June 30, 1993 $9,198,764.00 

STATEMENT OF INTEREST RECEIVED ON SAVINGS/INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $187,622.26 

Pooled Investment Fund 29,985.08 

Total Interest Received Fiscal 1993 $217,607.34 

OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1993 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Aquifer Land Acquisition $600,000.00 

Town Land Acquisition 330,000.00 

Street Sewers and Construction 85,000.00 

School Construction • 4,900,000.00 

$5,915,000.00 
Inside Debt Limit: 

Refuse Transfer Station $250,000.00 

Sewers - Pine Needle Park 2,070,000.00 

2.320.000.00 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt Balance $8,235,000.00 



183 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



GENERAL FUND 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1993 



DEBIT 



CREDIT 



Cash $4,128,537. 

Investment of Available Funds 4,000,000. 



Total Cash & Available Funds 



Personal Property 
Current Year 
Prior Years 



Real Estate 
Current Year 
Prior Year 
Prepaid Taxes 



Other Taxes 

Forestry 

Recreation 



TOTAL TAXES 

Provision for Abatements & 

Exemptions 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Reserve for Uncollected Taxes 



Tax Liens Receivable 
Reserve for Uncollected Tax Liens 

Taxes in Litigation Receivable 
Reserve for Taxes in Litigation 

Deferred Taxes Receivable 
Reserve for Deferred Taxes 





$8,128,537. 


2,819. 
4,406. 






7,225. 


193,197. 

146,095. 

0. 






339,292. 


(96). 
0. 






(96). 




346,421. 




15,229. 
72,931. 




346,421. 


ens 


434,581. 
55,763. 

55,763. 


n 


24,268. 

24,268. 




21,918. 

21,918. 



184 



DEBIT CREDIT 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Current Year 127,446 

Prior Years 51,516 



178,962 



Reserve for Uncollected 
Excise Tax 178,962 

Departmental Receivables: 

Ambulance 64,426. 

Reserve for Uncollected 64,426 

Departmental Receivables 

Apportioned Sewer Betterments Paid in Adv. (1,912). 
Apportioned Betterments Added to Tax: 

Water 2,017. 

Sewer 467,022. 

Committed Interest 6,233. 



473,360. 

Reserve for Betterments Added to Tax 473,360 

Amount to be Provided for Accrued Sick Leave 482,402 

Agency Payables: 

Teachers' Retirement Withholding (1,012) 

Life Insurance Withholdings 4,363. 

Add'l Voluntary Life Ins. Withholding 1,889. 

Health Insurance Withholdings 22,345. 

Annuity & Def. Comp. Withholding Payable 41,771. 

Medicare Withholding Payable (8) . 

69,348. 

Warrants Payable 506,983. 

Guarantee Deposits 7,500. 

Accrued Sick Leave 482,402. 

Treasurer's Tax Title 19,881. 

Reserved Fund Balances: 

Reserve for Encumbrances: 

Pine Needle Park Sewer Construction 602,732. 

Special Warrant Articles 5,133,270. 

Budget Escrow Accounts 139,790. 

Reserve for Planned Budget Deficit (F94) 340,000. 



TOTAL RESERVED FUND BALANCES 6,215,792. 

Unreserved Fund Balance 1,220,873. 

GENERAL FUND TOTALS $9,776,057. $9,776,057. 



185 



DEBIT CREDIT 
SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

Due from General Fund $ 666,691. 

Federal: 

Ambulance $ 508. 

Total Federal $ 508. 

State: 

Public Works - Highway up Front $ 283,317. 

Chapter 90 - Highway 5,400. 

Arts Lottery 5,629. 

Elderly Grants (225) . 

Right to Know 1,094. 

Suicide Prevention 254. 

Library Grants 11,218. 

DARE 767. 

Hurricane Bob 79,306. 

Allendale Affordable Housing ' 1,974. 

Drug Education Grant - Police 807. 
School: 

Per Pupil Education Money 7,097. 

Drug Free Schools 344. 

Chapter 1 ECIA 87. 

Title VIB (94-142) 6,381. 

Title VIB Early Childhood 1,887. 

Chapter II ECIA 499. 

School Improvement 2,454. 

D. Eisenhower Grant 117. 

Horace Mann Grant 1. 

Total State $408,408. 

Revolving: 

School Tuition 41,388. 

School Lunch 27,811. 

School Council Improvement 605. 

Memorial School Rents (636) . 

School Custodian Detail 3,945. 

Adult Education 10,750. 

School Athletics (2,015). 

Park and Recreation 8,905. 

Police Detail 20,543. 

College Night 0. 

Fire Revolving 6. 

Ambulance Mileage Fees 8,621. 

$119,923. 

Reserved for Appropriation: 

Perpetual Care 11,565. 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 64,335. 

$ 75,900. 



186 



Other Special Revenue: 

Gift Accounts 

Fine Arts 

Oxbow Water System Study 

Theatre Fund 

Conservation Fee Account 

Special Investigation Fund 

Cable Access 

Premium/ Interest Accrued on Loans 



SPECIAL REVENUE TOTALS 

TRUST FUNDS 

Cash 

In Custody of the Treasurer: 

Pension 

Conservation 

Stabilization 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 

Library Trusts 

Granville Daily Library 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Special Unemployment Insurance 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 

Council on Aging 

Palumbo Sports 

Municipal Insurance 

Group Health Insurance 

Pilgrim Health Trust 

Library Income Expendable 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Expendable 

Moses Ellis Post G.A.R. 

Antiquities 

Tricentennial 

Madelyn L. Grant 

Essay Fund 

Allendale Sewer Trust 

TRUST FUND TOTALS 

TOTAL FUND BALANCES 



DEBIT 


CREDIT 




$ 27,060. 




6,190. 




(652). 




780. 




15,300. 




900. 




100. 




12,274. 




$ 61,952. 


$ 666,691. 


$ 666,691. 


$2,683,408. 






$1,335,522. 




34,937. 




150,493. 




14,458. 




11,657. 




75,483. 




381,192. 




140,980. 




100,425. 




3,186. 




3,484. 




175,865. 




64,010. 




83,324. 




8,641. 


I 


4,405. 




8,735. 




3,899. 




1,643. 




38,146. 




2,838. 




40,085. 


$ 2,683,408. 


$ 2,683,408. 


$13,126,156. 


$13,126,156. 







Respectfully submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



187 



WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

ESTABLISHED JULY 1, 1991 (FISCAL YEAR 1992) UNDER 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL LAWS, CHAPTER 40, SECTION 39K 



WATER 

TOTAL SERVICES 3,246 

ADDED SERVICES 74 

THOUSAND GALLONS PUMPED 397,869 

THOUSAND GALLONS SOLD 341,189 



WATER ENTERPRISE EXPENDITURES $441,801 

RETAINED EARNINGS - RESERVED 223,594 

RETAINED EARNINGS - UNRESERVED 137.597 

(as of 6/30/93) 



SEWER 
TOTAL SERVICES 1,142 

ADDED SERVICES 15 



SEWER ENTERPRISE EXPENDITURES $430,966 

DEBT SERVICE 123,344 

RETAINED EARNINGS - UNRESERVED 34.818 



188 



CONTRACTS FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



Department 
Board 



Purposes 



Amount 



Assessors 

Stanley Bergeron 
96 Hecla St. 
Uxbridge, MA 

Municipal Computer 
Services 



Carlson Survey Co 



Health 

William R. Doomey 
1 Brush Hill Rd. 



Real Estate appraisal 
Consultant 



Printing tax bills, 
commitment books, master 
report lists and 
computerized equalization 
program. 

Correcting and updating 
assessor's maps. 



Consultant Sanitary 
Engineer/Agent for the 
Board of Health. 



$43 /hour 



$15,430 



$5. /Parcel 
$2. /Lot 



$19,600 



Walpole Visiting 
Nurse Association 
Walpole, MA 



Planning 

Whitman & Howard 



Responsible for all Public $ 8,230 
Health nursing needs and 
communicable disease 
follow-ups and statistics. 



Assistance in reviewing $80. /hour 
subdivision plans, site 
plans and other engineering 
services. 



School 

Joseph A. Emerson 
44 Bromfield St. 
Boston, MA 

Selectmen 

Tucci & Roselli 
C.P.A. 



Legal consultant for School $95. /hour 

Committee 



Fiscal Audit 



$ 6,950 



Town Clerk 

L.H.S. Associates 
Dundee Park 



Street Listing and Voter $.40/name 
Census by Mail 



189 



PERPETUAL CARE 



John W. and Dorothy G. Ireland ! 

Donato and Janice Cardarelli 

Janet L. Maloney 

Samuel and Valerie Nejame, Jr. 

Harry S. and Lydia Santangelo 

and Alfred J. Ouellette 

H. Hong 

L. and Grace D. McCurry and Gail Dahlberg 
Michael and Michelle DiNapoli 
Francis N. Alger 
Fay 

H. and Shirley R. Sullivan 

and Virginia Mezzanotti, Sr. 



Joan M, 
Alice Y 
Richard 



Marie S 
Charles 
John L. 



Carol Stockman 



I 350 

1,400 

700 

1,400 

350 

1,400 

1,400 

700 

2,100 

1,400 

700 

700 

800 

Zfifi 

$14,100 



190 



INDEX 



Page 
Town Officers Elected 

APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Board of Selectmen 9 

Assessors 19 

Town Accountant 19 

Town Clerk 19 

Fire Chief 19 

Board of Health 19 

Moderator 19 

Planning Board 20 

Treasurer/Collector 20 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Affordable Housing Committee 40 

Aging, Council on 42 

Ambulance Department 38 

Animal Control Off icer/ Inspector 39 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 43 

Architectural Barriers Committee 45 

Assessors, Board of 44 

Cable Television Committee 46 

Cemetery Commissioners 50 

Civil Defense Department 48 

Conservation Commission 52 

Cultural Council 51 

Fire Department 32 

Health, Board of 59 

Historical Commission 63 

Housing Authority. ... .65 

Inspection Department 66 

Kingsbury Pond Committee 69 

Library Trustees 78 

Long Range Planning Committee 72 

Medfield Youth Advisory Commission 103 

Memorials, Committee to Study 82 

Memorial Public Library 75 

Memorial Day Address 80 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 73 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 83 

Park and Recreation Commission 84 

Planning Board 87 

Police Department 35 

Public Works, Superintendent 29 

Recycling Committee 90 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 100 

Selectmen, Board of 24 

Tree and Insect Pest Control 101 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 93 

Veterans' Services 100 

Water and Sewerage Board 98 

Youth Advisory Commission 102 



191 



Page 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 



Superintendent of Schools 106 

Assistant Superintendent ... 108 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Ill 

Graduation Exercises, High School 113 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 117 

Dale Street School 120 

Ralph Wheelock School 123 

Memorial School 126 

Report of the Pupil Services Department 128 

Athletic Director 132 

Adult Education Program 131 

Food Service Director 136 

Director of Plant Management 138 



TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births 143 

Deaths 150 

Marriages 147 



TOWN MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS 



Annual Town Election, March 29, 1993 153 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting 

April 26, 1993 156 

Warrant and Proceedings, Special Town Meeting 

October 4, 1993 175 

Special Town Election, November 1, 1993 178 



FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors' Report 180 

Collector 181 

Contracts for Professional Services 189 

Perpetual Care 190 

Town Accountant 184 

Treasurer 182 

Water and Sewer Department 188 



192